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RAP00568.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • produced several -features. On the highest part o-f the slope there was an irregular pit (44) appro;: i matel y 1.8m in diameter and 0.1m deep, whose -fill (45) produced 1 sherd o-f late Iron—Age/early Roman pottery (Fabric 12), 1 sherd o-f grey coarse ware (Fabric 57) and some roofing
  • ). There was a sub-rect anqul ar pit në;
  • was médiéval (2128 sherds), the great majority of which was of Fabric 1 (2004 sherds). The post-medi eval pottery (235 sherds) was composed of Fabric 4 and tin-glazed wares of the eighteenth to nineteenth centuries; a small quantity of Roman (33 sherds) and Iron-Age wares (6 sherds
  • century as a metai rie (fig. 2). The field was permanent meadow in the early nineteenth century. In 1982 it was walked at 50m intervais and was classified as a 'médiéval site'; some Roman pottery was also recovered. In 1987 the field was gridded in 5m squares and walked for 'total
  • ' collection. Late IronAge/early Roman pottery was recovered (maximum 6 sherds per 5m square) and this tended to concentrate in two areas in the field. The much larger quanti ty of médiéval pottery (maximum 22 sherds per square) had a si mi 1 ar distribution, while the post— medi eval
  • in four 0.1m spits. Ail the spits produced appr ox i matel y the same relative proportions of pottery; the total 127 sherds comprised 6"/. pre-medieval (6 Iron-Age, 1 Roman), 88"/. médiéval and 67. post-medi eval wares. The médiéval pottery was very largely (947.) of Fabric 1
  • . The range o-f pottery recovered -from the top two spits was very différent -from the lowest spit. In the first twenty centimètres 45 sherds were -found; médiéval pottery predominated (837.), -followed by post-medi eval (157.) and a single sherd o-f Roman pottery (27.) ; 52 -fragments o-f
  • Roman site in the vicinity, and a few sherds in the topsoil, there is no trace of Roman settlement on this field and little to suggest Roman agricultural use. Présent évidence might suggest that the médiéval pottery in the plough soil derived from very heavy manuring, although
  • material was obtained from T29 (as was reflected by the results D -f the total collection) but more Roman pottery was found. Time ran ont and the sites had to be backfilled at the point, when ditches were recognised (Asti 13. and Davies 1987, 118-21). In 1988 the excavation was resumed
  • tile (Fabric 1, 0. 778kg) . Another, smaller pit (27) had been eut into this fill (1.35m in diameter, 0.1m deep), and the fill (26) of this pit contained 1 sherd of late Ir on-Age/ear 1 y Roman pottery (Fabric 13). Farther down the slope (8m from pits 44 and 27) were three
  • there was a ditch terminal (34), 0.62m wide and 0.25m deep. The fill (33) produced the largest collection of pottery from the site - 25 sherds. The majority (13) were of a late Iron-Age/earl y Roman fabric (Fabric 12) , but there was also a terra-ni qra-type base D -f a bowl (Fabric 65), a rim
  • was probably used for agricultural purposes in the Roman period and hence that the distribution of Roman pottery on the surface derived from manuring. However, the concentrations of brick and tile found in 'total' collection cannot be expiai ned in this way, since the material occurs
  • material collected from this field originally suggested thaï i t was a likely site to find évidence of continuity from Roman into later periods, with its distribution of Roman, médiéval and post-medi eval pottery and brick and tile too, as wel 1 as earthworks. It is therefore very
  • did not dérive from the local bedrock (Brioverian shale). A small number of squares (7) had some Roman pottery (maximum 3 sherds per square) while the post-medi eval pottery (maximum 7 sherds per square) was evenly distributed over the field, as were the small quantities (maximum
  • riant 1 y made from Fabric 1. There was indeed one sherd of Roman ware from the earl i est ditch fill (39) but this i s évidence? too slight to suggest any dating for the feature, qui te apart from the façt that other features were eut into it. The other features had 2 sherds
  • (with both strap and rod handles) were made in Fabric 1, and there is clear indication of internai glazing. This discovery goes a long way towards explaining the apparent dearth of table wares in the material recovered from f i el dwal k i ng . Fine wares were however represented: Fabric
  • pottery (maximum 5 sherds per square) was more evenly spread. Smal 1 quanti ti es of brick and tile (maximum 0 .5kg per square) were uhevenl y distributed, but tended to concentrate in the south of the field, away from the cl Lister i ng of pre—médiéval and médiéval pottery
  • , and the majority (577.) of the post-medi eval wares was ni neteenth-century . Smal 1 quanti ti es of brick and tile were recovered but only from the first three spits (total 23 fragments, 0. 787kg) . Context 1, however, had in addition to local quartz and quartzite large quantities (120kg
  • o-f the trench because o-f lack of space for the spoil, so the trench was reduced in size to 6 X 3m. The pottery from this layer (2), like the stone fragments, provides a complète contrast with that of the plough soil. 61 sherds were found, ail of which were Irôn Age, the most
  • -orange clay (24) from the surface of which came 20 sherds of Iron-Age pottery, the majority of which were of Fabrics 86 (607) and 89 (257). There was no sign of feat ures eut into this layer, which 1 ay directly on the degraded, manganèse— stai ned , quartzitic bedrock (05a) (33
RAP00565.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • commune was intensively cultivated from the 1 ater twelfth century (although small amounts of earlier pottery could reflect earlier activity), while the absence of early post-medieval wares suggests a lapse in arable cultivation during the early modem period or changes in manuring
  • and cadastral settlements. In the particular case of Roman wares, only small quantities have been recovered and the 'total' collections made from D221 and B347 both suggest that Roman sites generate little pottery on the surface, though they may produce large quantities of brick and tile. 0f
  • covered, encompassing 772 hectares (4.01% of the surface area of the four communes). 30.99kg of pottery and 93.92kg of man-made building material were recovered from the transects; 45% of the pottery was médiéval, 53.6% post-medieval and 1.4% Roman. No pre-Roman pottery was found
  • and post-medieval pottery; 0221 had been classified as a 'possible site', with a prépondérance of médiéval pottery in an assemblage that included Roman wares; B216 was a 'blank' field which had produced no finds; B347 was classified as a 'site 1 , with Roman pottery predominating. Soil
  • ity readings did not vary much, but although médiéval and post-medieval pottery were gênerai ly distributed over the field, both Roman wares and brick and tile cl ustered in the north-west quarter. Although quantities of Roman pottery were small, those of brick and tile were
  • size is 0.44 hectare. In the early nineteenth century it was part of an area of water meadow, 250m from the nearest settlement of Le Cleu. 0.3 Roman sherds per square were collected (2.11g), with 0.4 médiéval sherds (1.63g), 0.31 post-medieval sherds (1.71g) and 2.38 fragments
  • of brick and tile (50.82g). The assemblage included second-century Roman wares, fifteen fragments of tegul a and one of imbrex. Médiéval and post-medieval pottery were gênerai 1 y distributed over the field but both Roman pottery and brick and tile cl ustered in the north-eastern third
  • . As with field 0221, this cl ustering was sufficiently pronounced (and sufficiently distinct from the distribution of médiéval and post-medieval pottery) to suggest that a Roman-period structure once stood on the field. Magnetic susceptibil ity readings produced unusually high values
  • area, with 11% of fabric 5, a soft cream fabric used for médiéval table wares. There was a small proportion of both Roman and early médiéval types (3% [fabrics 13 and 16] and 2% [fabric 10] respecti vel y; see below, 10). The absence of the highly fired quartz-tempered wares
  • it was exploited as meadow, apparently in the early post-medieval period. The range of pottery found in both field boundaries reflects closely that recovered from 'total' collection of Allô. The désertion of the médiéval settlement may have been connected with the remodelling of this area when
  • and classified by Astill, Cook and Wright, and compared with the existing fabric séries. No changes have been suggested for this séries, which now comprises 16 fabric groups for prehistoric, Roman, médiéval and early post-medieval pottery. In December 1984 the fabric séries was compared
  • cadastre, as usual. More than three-quarters of the concentrations (80.2%) lay more than 100m away from early nineteenth-century settlements and only 7.5% lay within 50m of them. (This is not signif icantly différent from distances from modem settlements). Surface material tends
  • was recorded, the field being the same size and shape as at présent but divided into bandes; an area of 1 ande lay to the north and the nearest settlement (La Boulardaie) lay 130m away. Pottery, building material and schi ste were collected from an area of 1 hectare, distributed ail over
  • unusually large, and their distribution, together with the nature of the assemblage, suggests that the field once contained a Roman-period structure. Médiéval and post-medieval pottery, by contrast, probably arrived as a resuit of manuring. B216 lies on a slight north-west si ope at 65m
  • the same alignaient as the lynchet. The ditch was fi 1 1 ed with a homogeneous silty loam which contained two sherds of médiéval pottery and two pièces of (? médiéval) tile. The fill of the ditch was indistinguishable from the overlying thick 1 ayer of loam, which constituted the main
  • characteristic of the région in the sixteenth to early eighteenth centuries was notable: only 3% of post-medieval pottery was recovered, and that mostly modem. There was no apparent zoning of particular fabrics, which would suggest a constant accumulation of soil produced by near continuous
  • . It produced only seven pièces of brick and tile and 47 sherds of pottery. Most of the pottery was of fabric 1 (44.7%); there was also a notable proportion of the médiéval tableware, fabrics 5 (12.5%) and 6 (21.3%). The post-medieval wares were mainly nineteenth-century types (8.5
  • and tile coul d indicate that this happened before brick and tile were in common use. Both trenches have shown that lynchets could have a complicated history, with their origins in other features. From the point of view of land-use history, the pottery suggests that this area of Ruffiac
  • of évidence suggests intensive cultivation in the late middle âges that was limited in the early modem period with changes in the social status of the 1 andowner and in his method of 1 and management. 8 Envi ronmental , Pottery, Architectural and Language Work, 1984-85 In the course
  • of the last year pollen analysis has been carried out on samples taken during 1984, in particular from buried soils beneath banks in woods near Le Vivier (not far from the excavation site) and Le Rond Point (Carentoir), areas of extensive 1 ande in the early nineteenth century. Although
RAP00566.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • T15 and T16 clearly do so. Although there is no défi ni te structural évidence, the assemblage coming from the pit group 7 can only be interpreted as settlement débris. The pottery forms suggest a very late Iron Age, or very early Roman , date» The similarity in form and fabric
  • the ancien cadastre , as usua 1 . More than three-quarters of concentrations of pottery (76.7V.) 1 ay more than 100m away from early n i net eenth-century settlements and only 12» 5% 1 ay within 50m of them» (The former is only slightly higher than distances from modem settlements
  • were walked (of which to be covered (see fig. B) » hectares (18% of the surface area 6 were in M), encompassing 257 of Transect N) . 7.86kg of pottery and 13.81kg of man-made building material were recovered from thèse transects; 1.37. of the pottery was pre-Roman „ 1% Roman, 29.7
  • with plough soil. A small négative feature, 20cm wide, was also noted in section. Neither feature produced finds. The pottery from the plough soil of bot h T3 and T7 was entirely médiéval, and of a similar character to that recovered from the surface, that is 907. coarse wares of fabric 1
  • represent the; original soil which formed the lynchet» A column of saimples was taken through the de;posits for soil analysis. Pottery from the colluvium was médiéval, similar to that recovered from the surface and from the other trenches; the majority were coarse wares (547. of fabric 1
  • of man-made building mater i al were recovered frorn the transects; 6.47. of the pottery was Roman, 34.87. médiéval and 58.8?/;, post-medi evail » This is consi derabl y more brick and tile than recovered in each previous season, rather more Roman pottery and rather less médiéval. Ten
  • pottery, and the saine conventions are hereby used to distinguish between thems fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five or more fragments of building material) have been termed 'sites'; fields in which one
  • again stress the large quanti ti es of brick and tile, relatively large of Roman and smal 1 of médiéval pottery» The spatial distribution of this material i s as interesting as in previous years, and broadly consistent with it» There are 'blank' zones within the four communes
  • of Transect G, from Métairie au Joly to Le Nouai-)» The figures quoted above demonstrate the remarkably high proportion of fields in G with large concentrations of surface material. The présence of tile scatters, sometimes with smal 1 quanti ties of Roman material associated, were notable
  • management the proportion of sites located and quanti ti es of material collected is entirely comparable with those in the four core communes. However , there is less médiéval material than has usual 1 y been found there and it was a considérable contrast to collect pre-Roman sherds from
  • and were 14cm and 20cm (contexte 4 and 5 respecti vel y ) deeps eamples for pollen and soil analysis were taken from context 5» No finds were recovered from the features, but four sherds of pottery came from the surface of the ditch fillings, whose ■fabrics were différent from those
  • , 387. of fabric 3), with a small amount of fabric 5, a fine ware (87). The résulte of thèse excavations are important» It is clear from T3 and T7 that where soils are shallow the only archaeol ogi cal features that are likely to survive are those il which cleeply penetrate
  • from fieldwalking» The T4 features were excavated in an area where there was a small amount of médiéval pottery and high phosphate concentrations» While the small quanti ty of pottery is commensurate with the agricultural nature of the médiéval land-use, the high phosphates around
  • ) to check the négative results from Ti 1 and T9. The sections of the trenches were cleaned by hand and recorded. In ail some 50 working days were spent on site? the average size of the team was seven. Trench 9 The plough soil was excavated in 10cm spits. The amount of pottery decreased
  • médiéval pottery to the rier t h classify the two fields as a 'site'. In March 1986 intensive surface collection was rnade from most of the two fields. The distribution of médiéval and post-medi eval pottery on K446 was of a 1 ow and even density, although there appeared to be more
  • (from east to west s T23 , T24 , Iron Age pottery could be T25) , suc h that the areas producing of the trenches were cleaned by hand and tested. The si des part of the plough soil was excavated by recorded; the lowest features located thereby. The trenches were hand, as were
  • produced no finds. However seven abraded body sherds of Iron Age pottery were recovered from the surface of the .natural . Trench 24 of the plough soil ranged from T24 was 81m long, and the depth the si ope. The clay 15cm at. the top to 1.0m at the bottom of ow the plough soil
  • pottery are, however , likely to be an indicator of occupation (see also HSO) . In fieldwalking the ' greatest amount o-f this pottery came -from the areas eut by T24, the trench that produced the most convincing prehistoric -features. The long ditch in this trench could be one si de o
  • -f an enclosure, but the -failure to -find a turn would argue against this, and may suggest that it was eut merely to drain the land. The mixed date range o-f the potteryfrom this ditch makes it impossible to suggest a firm date for i t. The évidence for a holloway, replaced
  • by a métal led road, is particularly interesting. It demonstrates that the routes into Becul eu have changed. More importantly, the pottery from the holloway and associated ditch gives an indication that the earlier route was in use in the médiéval period» Thin section analysis of the si
RAP00567.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • of surface scatters Di scussi on Clearly the character of the surface material differs from transect to transect. Transects P and M had areas which produced a little pre-Roman pottery - as had Transect N - a phenomenon that is extremely rare in the core communes (Asti 11 and Davies 1986
  • for its very 1 ow proportions of médiéval pottery and very high of post-medi eval . Thèse results are striking by comparison with patterns of material recovered from the four core communes. Whereas the amounts of Roman material collected from the surface are mue h the same, the amounts
  • and the western section of M). Some of the Roman fabrics in eastern ti had not been noted before, and included a late Roman roi 1 er-st amped sherd of Argonne ware from M447, near 'Château Gaillard', 2.5km east of Pipriac bourg ■ This ware has an essentially coastal distribution, although
  • of pottery, 161.72kg of man-made building material, 23 from thèse flints and 611.72g of haematite were recovered transects , together with two worked pièces of quartz (from M). This breaks down, by transect, as follows: Brick/tile kg 18. 49 P M 121 . 77 21 . 46 R Pre-Rom. Pottery 1 . 47
  • there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered pottery, and the usual conventions are hereby used to distinguish between them: fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five or more fragments
  • .) 219 (25.57.) 858 Table 2: concentrations of surface material (percentage of fields walked per transect and in toto) Of thèse concentrations none had predomi nanti y Roman or prehistoric pottery but a small proportion had some Roman or pre-Roman sherds. Some concentrations had
  • : P M R Some Some pre—Rom. Roman 7 . 47. 11 . 17. 10. 67. 1 . 37. 6. 57. Table 3: Médiéval Post-medi eval 11. 17. 8. 17. 6 . 57. 48. 27. 32.57. 35. 5% Med. + Brick Post-med . 11.17. 18. 57. 3.87. 45.67. 51 . 57. Brick + pottery 11. 17. 107. 6 . 5 "
  • of material (15.67. 'possible', 177. 'probable' and 4.57. 'site'). Transect M itself produced unusually high quanti ti es of brick and tile, and a high proportion of its concentrations were characterized by brick and tile - some of which had Roman pottery associated. Transect R was notable
  • and proportions of médiéval material are 1 ower (especially in R) - as in N - while those of post-medi eval material are considerably higher, though not as high as in N; in the core 507. of pottery collected from the surface was médiéval and 46.77. post-medi eval . The proportion
  • on the north-east side of the high land near the Carentoi r /Combl essac boundary and none by the wood in the Lande de Craon, both areas lacking surface pottery too. There was little or no pink material on the western and south-western si des of this high land, and none from Couè'dillan
  • there are finds from the Rance/ Vi 1 ai ne river Systems and one sherd from Pipriac is already known (Galliou 1977: 91-2). The médiéval fabrics from this eastern région seem to have less mica, fewer spi cul es and more grog. Some of the fields with Roman material are of particular interest
  • . It is also of note that no Roman material was found in fields near the River Vilaine nor in the large 'blank' zone in Bruc (M). As in the core, Roman pottery is nearly always found in association with a distinct scatter of brick and tile (though this was not so in four cases, M502
  • and nearby M509, M516, M542) , and as in the core the quantities of Roman pottery were very small. Thèse tile scatters were sometimes surprisingly extensive, being évident over a distance of 300, and sometimes even 600m. In two cases fields were walked in the vicinity of already known
  • by smelting iron ore in shaf t f urnaces; that from R9, however, weighed 2kg and came from the bottoms of bowl furnaces; first- and second-century pottery was collected from the surface in this 6 area. This season 's work has produced several indications that the core communes
  • samples from the 198é> excavations has been undertaken by Anne Gebhardt, under the supervision of Marie-Agnès Courty. Analysis of pottery fabrics has continuée), the sorting and classification of fabrics from the three 19B6 seasons now being half completed. Further work on local
  • years, took place from 20 March - 4 April in the communes surrounding Ruffiac, Treal , St-Ni col as-du-Tertre and Carentoir, in the departments of Morbihan and 1 1 1 e-et-Vi 1 ai ne in eastern Brittany. The aim of the study is to détermine when, how and why the exploitation
  • éléments) analysis of documents, including the very detailed cadastral maps and records of the early nineteenth century. This latter analysis has been completed and is of psrticular significance for fieldwork since it allows complète reconstruction of the early ni neteenth-century
  • landscape
  • , Reading, Cardiff and York) numbered twenty-two, ' including the directors, and worked for twel ve deiys, from 22 March, with one day off. Six people went in advance, and worked for one day beforehand. Overall, 330 mandays were spent on this year ' s season, including travelling time
  • ) Sampling was organized in three 2km transects radiating from the core (P, M and R) and thèse were wal ked in the same way as Transects A to L within the core and Transect N outside it, in 1982-6. Transect P ran due west to the River Oust for 4.1km from the western boundary of Ruffiac
RAP01557.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport final de synthèse de fouille programmée 1996-1998)
RAP01768.pdf (le mésolithique en Bretagne. rapport de projet collectif de recherches)
  • planigraphie : gestion des matériaux, étude technologique et approche spatiale 135 X. PERSPECTIVES 156 1. Une petite problématique nouvelle 156 2. Objectifs 2002-2003 158 BIBLIOGRAPHIE 160 ANNEXE : MEMBRES DU PCR 167 Remerciements : Le nombre d'intervenants dans les divers
RAP00129.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport de sondage et de prospection-inventaire.)
  • h e headland from t h e mainland was u t i l i z e d as p a r t o f t h e d e f e n s i v e system i n t h e pre-Roman p e r i o d by t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a rampart along i t s n o r t h - w e s t e r n edge running from a prominent granite Beaumanoir, a t t h e
  • evidence b u t an e a r l y medieval date seems l i k e l y (Savidan 1935; Mazeres 1936). From 1952 u n t i l 1954 P r o f e s s o r F l e u r i o t examined t h e Roman w a l l a t t h e n o r t h - e a s t corner o f t h e s i t e b o t h west and s o u t h o f t h e Poste de Douane
  • d e p o s i t s was l i k e l y t o be good, w h i l e Trench 2 was l o c a t e d t o examine t h e s t r a t i g r a p h y i m m e d i a t e l y behind t h e Roman d e f e n s i v e w a l l . results, as w i l l be apparent from t h e d e s c r i p t i o n The t o follow
  • , C de A The Roman wall and maritime gate Le Yaudet. Mur romain et porte maritime (edge of cliff=abrupt de la falaise; excavation of 1953-5= fouilles de 1953-5; Trench 3 = tranchée n° 2; Iron Age wall= rempart de l'Age du Fer; approximate position of Roman wall=situation
  • D E T , P L O U L E C ' H , C de. A 0 1 2 3 4 5 Metres . L e Yaudet. Tranchée 2. Coupe est (Roman w a l l = mur romain; Iron Age wall F 31. Granite blocks set in clay= rempart de l'Age du Fer F 31, blocs de granite liés à l'argile ; Roman road surface = surface de la voie
  • établissement humain et son réseau de communications de la Préhistoire à nos jours. Le site exige que la recherche couvre ces multiples facettes et qu'y soit donc mené un programme de grande ampleur. BIBLIOGRAPHIE - BRIARD, J., Epées de Bretagne et d'ailleurs jetées dans les rivières à
  • (Tr. 1, phase le): La Tène Finale. Tranchée 2. Romain 33-44 Tr. 2, couches 31 et 2 (Tr. 2, phase 2b): fin du troisième après ( nombreux fragments de "black-burnished ware"). Tranchée 1. Romain 45-62 Tr. 1, couche 13 (Tr. 1, phase 3d): fin du troisième siècle. 53 Tr. 1, F5 (Tr. 1
  • (?) and occupation (LIA) Early occupation (NEO-EIA) 2a 1 Le Yaudet. Tranchée 1. Phases (early occupation(NEO- EIA) =occupation ancienne (Néo-Premier A . du F.); Quarry(?) and occupation (LIA) = carrière et occupation (Second A . du F.); stone building and its abandonment=bâtiment maçonné et
  • abandon; medieval field and lynchet=parcelle médiévale et lynchet; medieval building and occupation=bâtiment et occupation d'époque médiévale; recent=occupation récente). Le Yaudet, 1991: trench 2 y Hill wash 2c Roman soil accumulation 2b Roman gate structure and road 2a Iron
  • ; Iron Age soil accumulation=niveau de l'Age du Fer; Roman gate structure and road=porte et voie romaines; Roman soil accumulation=niveau d'époque romaine; hillwash=colluvionnement). THE LE YAUDET PROJECT First Interim Report on the excavations 1991 by Barry Cunliffe and Patrick
  • h e Baie de l a V i e r g e , a wide e s t u a r y a t t h e mouth o f t h e r i v e r Leguer. The promontory, r o u g h l y r e c t a n g u l a r i n shape, i s separated from t h e mainland by a deep v a l l e y a l o n g which t h e minor road from Le Yaudet v i l l a g e t
  • f t h e a n c i e n t v i l l a g e o f Le Yaudet and t h e r e l i c o f i t s f a r m l a n d , now abandoned. The s i t e was a c q u i r e d by t h e Departement o f Cote du Nord i n 1980, a t t h e r e q u e s t o f t h e Commune, t o p r o t e c t i t from development
  • i s c o v e r i e s made over t h e years have been c o n v e n i e n t l y summarized by L. Pape (1978, ASSASS) t o which may now be added a discussion o f C e l t i c and C a r t h a g i n i a n c o i n s from a n i n e t e e n t h c e n t u r y c o l l e c t i o n thought
  • t o have come from t h e s i t e (Sanquer 1983). Several excavations extensive nature. have taken place b u t none o f an I n 1935 a number o f s k e l e t o n s were d i s c o v e r e d c l o s e t o t h e church (parcelle 29). They were w i t h o u t d a t i n g
  • . To t h e west he uncovered a Roman gate which gave access t o a convenient of t h e c l i f f s . The e x c a v a t i o n has n o t been p u b l i s h e d b u t i n t e r i m accounts were prepared 1954, 1955). landing place a t the f o o t ( F l e u r i o t 1952, 1953, 1954a
  • ; I n 1969 P r o f e s s o r e x p l o r a t o r y work. Garlan and M e r l a t undertook further The Roman gate was c l e a r e d o f v e g e t a t i o n and a s e r i e s o f sondages c u t i n p a r c e l l e s 22, 13, 20, 12, and 5 exposing Roman and medieval m a t e r i
  • a l (Garlan 1969). Finally, i n 1978, a s m a l l sondage was dug t o examine a c i r c l e , which appeared on an a i r photograph, i n advance o f t h e c r e a t i o n o f a car park. P o t t e r y o f Bronze Age type was r e p o r t e d . It i s c l e a r from
  • the archaeological i n v e s t i g a t i o n s and casual d i s c o v e r i e s and from t h e h i s t o r i c a l r e c o r d (De La B o r d e r i e 1853, 1896; Fleuriot considerable h i s t o r i c a l 1954b) t h a t Le Yaudet i s a site of potential: the promontory has produced
  • r o n Age t h e s i t e c o n t i n u e d t o be occupied i n t h e Roman p e r i o d and a t some s t a g e , p o s s i b l y i n t h e l a t e t h i r d o r f o u r t h c e n t u r y was in defended by a w a l l t h e m i g r a t i o n p e r i o d t h e s e t t l e m e n t
  • m i t e d range o f s p e c i f i c g u e s t i o n s : how w e l l does a r c h a e o l o g i c a l evidence s u r v i v e ? what i s t h e n a t u r e o f t h e o c c u p a t i o n seguence i n t h e l e e o f t h e rampart? can t h e date o f t h e Roman m a r i t i m e gate
RAP00465.pdf (PONT-CROIX (29). villa antique de Kervenennec. rapport de fouille programmée)
  • des informations partielles,traitant de certains types de céramiques paraissaient,tant en France( Annales de Bretagne et des Pays de l'Ouest , Figlina(à P.) qu'à l»étranger( cf Michael FULFORB ,"Pottery and Britain's foreign trade in the later Roman period", dans D.P.S PËACOCK(Ed
  • .), Pottery and early commerce, London, 1977,p 35-84), li manque encore à ce jour une publication d'ensemble des résultats obtenus:nous comptons nous y consacrer pendant l'année 1978 et ne demanderons donc pas d'autorisation de fouilles pour 1 9 7 8 . Pour mener à bien ces premiers travaux
  • 2 de V.Hiïbener, coi d'un ovoïde en "blackburnished ware" importée du sud de 1'Angleterre(Dorset)»coquillages frustes(patelles,bigornes). La couche inférieure est celle de l'effondrement du caldarium et comprend en abondance pilettes,tubuli, tuiles,mortier,fragments d'enduits
RAP00401.pdf (SAINT-MALO (35). cité d'Alet - rue de Mesle. rapport de sauvetage urgent)
  • . FULFORD (M.), 1977. - Pottery and Britains Foreign trade in the later Roman period, in : - Pottery and Early Commerce, PEACOCK et AL.. HOFMANN (B.), 1980. - La céramique sigillée d'Alet, Dossiers du Ce.R.A.A.,~N°$, P.51-62. LANGOUET (L.), 1973. - Alet, ville ancienne, Thèse de Ille
  • . - Interpreting pottery, Batsford, London. CAMPION (L.), 1908. - L'enceinte romaine d'Alet, Revue Bretonne, p.165-178. FARRAR , 1968. - A late Roman blackburnished pottery industry in Dorset and its affinities, in : Proceedings of the Dorset Natural History and Archeological Society, p.174-180
  • BIBLIOGRAPHIE INTRODUCTION 1) MOTIVATIONS DE LA FOUILLE. Au mois d'août, le projet de construction de deux résidences à l'intérieur du périmètre de la ville gallo-romaine d'Alet (SAINT-SERVAN) est présenté au public ; il concerne la parcelle 135 de la section BL du plan cadastral de SAINT
  • bâtiments dont l'implantation a dû être assez proche du secteur fouillé- de même, à l'avenir et sans doute au hasard des aménagements urbains de Saint-Servan (Saint-Malo), une reconnaissance de nature identique devra à nouveau être entreprise. BIBLIOGRAPHIE : ANDERSON (A.), 1984
RAP02401.pdf (LE QUIOU (22). la villa gallo-romaine. rapport final de synthèse 2008 de fp 2006-2008)
  • structures annexes 104 PLANCHES D'INVENTAIRE D U M O B I L I E R C E R A M I Q U E 138 BIBLIOGRAPHIE 149 15 te Rsncesf la Rie« M orlai» BRIEUC ^FINISTERE fe'.Ctóreli SsrSHAS OCEAN ATLANTQ I UE "¡3 HariJi ^es'Mares. (amboutj 'la Basse Rimi fei: h si; la Hautîre Roi le
  • chiffre arabe pour la zone fouillée, une lettre pour caractériser la phase, un chiffre arabe pour l'état et enfin une lettre pour le sous-état, soit pour le premier état de la phase B de la zone 2 : 2B1. L'ordre de numérotation est croissant de haut en bas, c'est à dire de la phase la
RAP02622.pdf (LE QUIOU (22). la villa de la gare. rapport intermédiaire 2010 de fp 2009-2011)
  • Décapage et premières observations sur la zone 8 46 48 3. Poursuite du programme en 2011 4. Bibliographie Générale 50 4.1 BIBLIOGRAPHIE SUR LE MOBILIER 57 lit. Inventaires techniques 58 58 65 65 ANNEXE A- Inventaire des céramiques par Françoise Labaune ANNEXE B- Inventaire des
  • un mur, un ragréage de sol...). La numérotation utilisée sera la suivante : Un premier chiffre arabe pour la zone fouillée, une lettre pour caractériser la phase, un chiffre arabe pour l'état et enfin une lettre pour le sous-état, soit pour le premier état de la phase B de la zone
RAP03345.pdf (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil : Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de FP)
  • .......................................................................................................................... 122 3. Objectifs scientifiques pour 2017 .................................................................................... 123 BIBLIOGRAPHIE ...................................................................................................................... 125 ANNEXE 1
RAP02810.pdf (LE QUIOU (22). la villa de la gare. rapport intermédiaire de fp 2012-2014)
  • conclusions 48 3 Etude du mobilier céramique 48 3.1. Méthodes de travail 48 3.1.1. Le traitement des données 48 3.1.2. Le mobilier céramique. 49 3.1.3. Les autres matériaux. 54 4. Bibliographie Générale 57 4.1 Bibliographie sur le mobilier 67 Annexe I diagramme
RAP03449 ((56). Autour du Golfe du Morbihan, les landes de Lanvaux et le sud de la vallée de la Vilaine. Rapport de PD 2016)
  • of upstanding structural remains including large rectilinear ramparts of probable Iron Age origin, several rough stone buildings and walls from the Mediaeval period. These remains encompass an area c.1ha in size. Recent discovery of Gallo-Romain and medieval pottery indicate
  • Coet Sürho: alluvial soils overlying granite and gneiss Pen Castel: rendzinas overlying granite Recent discovery of mediaeval ceramic and building debris at Coet Sürho (Muzillac) suggests the locations of 2 potential medieval settlements dating th th from the 13 -15 century. Survey
  • Castel, échelle 1/1250 2 2.1 ACCÈS, CONDITIONS AU SOL ET CONSIDÉRATIONS GÉNÉRALES Survey in M1-4 at Coet Sürho extended through mainly accessible arable and pasture sloping gently to the N/NE. Complete survey coverage in M3 was made impossible due to obstruction from numerous
  • small-scale ferrous responses are evident throughout the results from both survey at Coet Sürho (M1-4) and Pen Castel. These mostly represent modern ferrous debris contained within the topsoil and are not discussed in the results section of the report unless deemed relevant. Large
  • concentrations of ferrous response at Coet Sürho in locations M3-4 derive from survey in proximity to existing boundaries and farm buildings. Broad regions of ferrous response from survey in proximity to existing boundaries are also evident in the Pen Castel survey results. One substantial
  • /negative responses from natural soil/geological variation also extend throughout the survey results from Pen Castel. The range of this variation has significantly complicated interpretation of the Pen Castel survey results. Client CERAM Coet Sürho (Muzillac) et Pen Castel (Arzon
  • remains uncertain. 3.1.5 3.1.6 3.1.7 M2 No responses of definite archaeological character have been recorded from survey in M2. Poorly defined negatives 11 to the N likely represent variations in soil morphology/geology. M3 No responses of definite archaeological character
  • are evident in the results from M3. Responses of possible interest are indicated, mainly in the central and western region of survey (12 & 13). The archaeological significance of these anomalies is uncertain. Insufficient survey area available in M3 and an abundance of modern ferrous
  • responses has made interpretation of the results from M3 uncertain. M4 No responses of definite archaeological character are evident in the results from M4. Potentially signficant responses are indicated to the NW (14), NE (15) and S/SW (16). Response group 15 to the E may represent
  • The southern corner of a suspected Mediaeval building foundation (17) is evident to the N in the results from survey at Pen Castel. Potential further building footprints may be present to the NE (18 & 19), although these represent weak linear/sub-angular patterns which are barely visible
  • of anomaly 17 and W of 23 likely derive from natural soil/geological variation. Further potentially significant responses include a linear arrangement of anomalies (20) running almost parallel with the upstanding Iron Age ramparts enclosing the site; several weak linear © Target Client
  • © Target Interpretation of the results from survey at Pen Castel is highly tentative. The potential that many of the anomalies highlighted from survey in this location derive from soil/geological variation should not be dismissed. Client CERAM Coet Sürho (Muzillac) et Pen Castel
  • locations M2-M3 at Coet Sürho display no responses of obvious archaeological character. Interpretation of the results from M3 has been particularly hampered due to numerous trees which prevented complete survey coverage. 4.3 Interpretation of the results from survey at Pen Castel
  • remains somewhat speculative. Excluding the building foundation (17) highlighted to the north most of the anomalies in the Pen Castel results are poorly defined and masked by soil/geological variations. Groups of anomalies highlighted as potentially significant include potential
RAP03185.pdf ((22)(29)(35)(56). Les premiers peuplements de l'ouest de la France : dépôts pléistocènes et occupations paléolithiques de la région Bretagne. Rapport de PCR)
  • ., SHAW A., sous presse - Discoveries From La Manche: Five years of Early Prehistoric Research in the Channel Island of Jersey. Archaeology International, sous presse. RAVON A.-L. & LAFORGE M., 2015 - Présentation du PCR: Les premiers peuplements de l’Ouest de la France : dépôts
  • . Perspectives de recherche 2016-2017 6.1. Calendrier des opérations et des analyses 6.2. Communications à venir 6.3. Publications à venir 7. Conclusion 8. Bibliographie 1 – INTRODUCTION 1.1 – Problématiques et objectifs du projet Ce programme pluridisciplinaire vise à produire une
  • , Quaternary International, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2015.07.066. RAVON A.-L., GAILLARD C., MONNIER J.-L., 2015 - Menez-Dregan (Plouhinec, Far Western Europe): the lithic industry from layer 7 and its Acheulian components, Quaternary International, sous presse. 5.2
  • longue haleine. 8 – BIBLIOGRAPHIE - BAHAIN J-J. (2007) - La méthode de datation par résonance de spin électronique (ESR) au Museum national d’Histoire Naturelle. Vingt ans de recherches méthodologiques et d’applications géochronologiques. Habilitation à diriger des recherches