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RAP00567.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • the 'blanks' lay on the steep si opes around La Hennelaye and Le Haut Couëdic. In R the 'blanks' lay near the Carentoi r /Combl essac commune boundary and on the steep si opes to the north east of this area; also north of Comblessac bourg , in and around the Lande de Craon. There were also
  • on the north-east side of the high land near the Carentoi r /Combl essac boundary and none by the wood in the Lande de Craon, both areas lacking surface pottery too. There was little or no pink material on the western and south-western si des of this high land, and none from Couè'dillan
  • and the western section of M). Some of the Roman fabrics in eastern ti had not been noted before, and included a late Roman roi 1 er-st amped sherd of Argonne ware from M447, near 'Château Gaillard', 2.5km east of Pipriac bourg ■ This ware has an essentially coastal distribution, although
  • EAST BRITTANY SURVEY 1987 PU EAST BRITTANY SURVEY - OUST/VILAINE WATERSHED EASTER 1987 The seventh season in a programme of fieldwork, itself part of a larger, mul ti -di sci pl i nary study of the relationship between 1 and-use and settlement during the last two thousand
  • landscape
  • (from the area of La Sourigaie to La Houssaie), passing through the communes of Missiriac and Malestroit and the northern outskirts of the town of Malestroit; Transect R ran north east for 7.75km from Trelo to Le Mur at the north-east corner of Carentoir, passing through the communes
  • of Comblessac, Guer and Les Brûlais; Transect M ran due east to the River Vilaine for 21.5km front the area of Bat Colin and Le Boschet in south-east Carentoir, passing through the communes of La Chapelle 1 Baceline, Sixt, Bruc , Pipriac and Guipry, and just south of the bourg of Pipriac
  • two groups of 'blank' fields south east and south west of Comblessac. Together thèse zones suggest that the settlement of Comblessac and its immediately dépendent arable may have been rather small, much smaller than the centres in the core communes: it is notable that a tile
  • scatter with Roman material lies near the bourg of Comblessac and not on some distant periphery, as is more usual . In Transect M there were 'blank' areas on the banks of the River Aff and its tributaries but most notable was a very marked and very large 'blank' zone in the commune
  • of Bruc — for a distance of some 2.5km; thèse 'blank' fields begin already in the eastern part of Sixt commune though do not reach as far as the présent boundary of Pipriac on the east. Everything, including the shape of the fields, suggests that this is an area of late exploitation
  • . Thereafter, although there are a few 'blank' fields in the nei ghbourhood of Pipriac it is again marked that there are very few from Pipriac east to the Vilaine. The contrast between this area and that to the west of it is very striking. The distribution of material in relation
  • of Pipriac was interesting. Some small plots beside houses in the town contained more médiéval material than post-med i eval . Near Pipriac, although some médiéval fabrics were recovered, post-medi eval sherds were far more notable. The distribution of material in gênerai reflects
  • . In P concentrations tended to lie on south-, south-eastor south-west—f aci ng slopes (48.17.) or on those facing west. (11.17.) - south-west especially; i n M they tended to lie on north-, north-east-or north-west-f aci ng slopes (36.97.) or, southand sDuth-west-f aci ng slopes
  • (23.8%) - north-east especially; in R on east-, north-eastor south-east-f aci ng slopes (37.77.) - east especially. In P 37% lay on -Fiat land, in M 19.47. and in R 22.6%. Ail this is unremarkable in the light of the prevailing local topography. Présence of the imported schi stes
  • of thèse materials in large parts of the Bruc 'blank' zone, again in areas where there is virtually no foreign surface material; and there are none in the high zone near the Moulin des Bruyères or 1 ow down by the River Vilaine. There are also very large zones which only have black
  • material and not pink. Pink schi stes are found, however, in some discrète areas: close to south-eastern Carentoir, in western parts of the Bruc 'blank', in odd fields near Pipriac, around Patis de la Porte, Château La Frèche, La Glonnais, Malon and in small quantities around Les
  • north east to Comblessac, as also north from Comblessac to the Lande de Craon. The pattern of occurrences of the schi stes in thèse transects suggests that the pink schi stes . i.e. material from the Guer quarries, may wel 1 have been the earliest to be used in the roofing industry
  • examination o-F it. Preliminary examination of the pottery suggests that there are some distinctions between the fabrics collected between Pipriac and the Vilaine (Transect M, eastern portion) and those characteri sti c both of the core and of sample transects near it (N, P, R
  • was found near Le Boschet, Château de la Boulaye, 'Château Gaillard' (ail in M) and near le Mur (R) . There are, however, two cases of such material being found near (apparently) non-seigneurial settlements 300m from Comblessac in R and 100m from La Rigaudiere, 1km south of Pipriac, in M
  • . It is also of note that no Roman material was found in fields near the River Vilaine nor in the large 'blank' zone in Bruc (M). As in the core, Roman pottery is nearly always found in association with a distinct scatter of brick and tile (though this was not so in four cases, M502
RAP00565.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • usters of other classes of material. 5 Excavations (EBS85 Tl and T2) Small -scale excavation of earthworks was undertaken in order to begin investigation of the soils and archaeology within field boundaries near sites identified in fieldwalking. As indicated previously, one
  • EAST BRITTANY SURVEY: QUST-VILAINE UATERSHED REPORT ON FIELDWORK IN MARCH-APRIL 1985 The fourth season in a programme of fieldwork, itself part of a larger, multi-discipl inary study of the rel ati onshi p between land-use and seulement during the last two thousand years, took
  • collection; phosphate analysis and soil magnetic susceptibil ity survey of the four selected areas; and excavation of part of a bank and lynchet near a field from which 'total' collection had previously been made. Three days (21-23 March) were spent in préparation by three people
  • . The remaining concentrations (25.7%) had a prédominance of building material, at présent treated as undatable. 2 As usual , the topographical position of the sites was analysed. About a third of them (29.4%) were on flat 1 and while 17.1% were on south-facing and 16.6% on south-east-f
  • in the Coet Morel /Hôtel Orl and area (Carentoir). Surface material is markedly absent from fields on the northern and southern boundaries of L, on the east/west ridges (particularly on a band north west of Carentoir) and - as might be expected - on most steep slopes. There are again
  • and topographie position are similar to those of B319, walked in 1983 and also interpreted as a manuring scatter (Astill and Davies 1984a: 20). Six fields in the near vicinity were also walked at 50m intervais; thèse produced some material but no notable concentrations. D221 lies on the 45m
  • contour in a flat area. In the early nineteenth century it 1 ay on a track and was part of a block of arable in the ' château landscape' associated with La Meule, 125m to the west (a landscape where seigneurial 1 and management introduced distinctive rectangular field shapes, greater
  • . The results confirm the impression that this 1 and was not brought into cultivation until the twentieth century, and confirm the classification made on the basis of transect walking - the field real ly is 1 bl ank 1 . B347 lies on a slight east-facing slope at 35m, beside a stream, and its
  • lynchet some 1.8m high. This area is near the northern periphery of the Ruffiac commune, and the ancien cadastre indicates that it was a zone of extensive 1 ande in the early nineteenth century. Set within the 1 ande was the petit château of Coetion, with its metai ries (associated
  • farms) of La Touche Gourelle, Bas Coetion, Ruis, Gayon, and Le Vivier. The surroundings of the château seem to have been deliberately landscaped with long, straight, tree-lined approach roads, copses and a fish pond, and the farms are surrounded by the large rectangul ar blocks
  • of arable characteristic of the ' château landscape". Since the château appears to have been built by the seventeenth century, and the associated landscaping at least considerably pre-dates the nineteenth century, the settlement at Allô was presumably abandoned before seigneurial
  • interests put their mark on this landscape. The bank, which lies in an area of nineteenth-century meadow and is not shown on the ancien cadastre, may therefore relate to earlier land-use; the lynchet lies at the edge of the château arable, about which - at least - it should furnish some
  • characteristic of the région in the sixteenth to early eighteenth centuries was notable: only 3% of post-medieval pottery was recovered, and that mostly modem. There was no apparent zoning of particular fabrics, which would suggest a constant accumulation of soil produced by near continuous
  • of the last year pollen analysis has been carried out on samples taken during 1984, in particular from buried soils beneath banks in woods near Le Vivier (not far from the excavation site) and Le Rond Point (Carentoir), areas of extensive 1 ande in the early nineteenth century. Although
  • not look profitable to pursue this work in the near future. The preliminary stages of analysis of the pedology and sedimentol ogy of the soils have been initiated. Dr Marie-Agnès Courty and M. N. Fedoroff, with their assistant Anne Gebhardt, visited the study area during the season
  • only; for example, the dense scatters on the long-used fields on the western outskirts of Carentoir have ail three ^colours while the area of the ' château landscape 1 around Gree Orlain and Herblinaie has only black and grey. (In fact, black zones do not seem to be distinct from
  • Bretagne, ii, 27-34. Astill, G. and Davies, W. 1982a 'Un recherche sur le terrain dans l'Est de Bretagne, xxxv, 24-42. nouveau programme de la Bretagne', Arch. en Astill, G. and Davies, W. 1982b 'Fieldwalking in East Brittany, 1982', Cambridge Médiéval Celtic Studies, iv, 19-31
  • , Sussex Bell, M. 1983 'Valley sédiments as évidence of prehistoric land-use on the South Downs', Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society, xlix, 119-150. 1+ EAST BRITTANY SURVEY 1985 £J3 fields walked m 1965 ■— — commune boundaries A • ■ sites A c* U probable • médiéval si tes
RAP00568.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • of an area around the château which had been landscaped to create wide avenues, fishponds, meadow and large rectangular blocks of arable near métairies. The château has several lintels dated to the 1660s and had clearly been built by the late seventeenth century; the area may already have
  • EAST BRITTANY SURVEY EAST BRITTANY SURVEY SEPTEMBER Introduction B409 (Carentoir ZA161) Fig. A92 1, 2 (Ruffiac ZK67) Fig. A3 1/79 3 (Ruffiac ZN119) Fig. 4 Fig. 5 H 132 (Ruffiac ZL40) Fig. 674 6 (Carentoir YB29) Fig. 7 L26 (Ruffiac YA224) Fi g . 8 D153
  • (Carentoir YK5) Fig. 9 Fig. 10 General Comment Acknowl edgements Références SEASQN 1988 EAST BRITTANY SURVEY - OUST/ VILAINE WATERSHED SEPTEMBER 1988 The eighth and 1 ast season in a programme of fieldwork, itself part of a larger, mul ti -di sci pl i nary study
  • , and only two days were lost because of rain; however , the gênerai dryness meant that the ground was hard and made for very heavy working. EBS 88 B409 (Carentoir Zft 161) B409 lies on a west-facing si ope near the settlement of Le Eiois Guillaume, documentée! from the eighteenth
  • ) was si ted in the north-east part of the field where there was a coïncidence of pre— medi eval and médiéval pottery. A test pi t (T37) was also dug in the south west , over a squar e wh i c h had produced n o t. a b 1 e qu ant i t i e s of pre- medi eval pottery and brick and tile
  • some pièces were 5mm across. This layer varied in thickness -from 0.75m on the eastern, up-slope, side o-f the trench to 0.38m on the west. At the east end the top sur-face o-f 2 curved as i -f the layer had been mounded up. This layer could not be total ly excavated over the whole
  • fragments. Mear the east section was an oval pit (25: lm x 0.75m and 0.28m deep); the fill again produced no finds (27). Another pit in section (26: fill 28, no finds) had been eut into by a smal 1er pit (7: fill 8). Three intercutting pits were excavated in the centre of the trench
  • 2 and to the présent ground surface, that is it occurred at a higher level in the west end of T36 and sloped down to the east. It was on this surface that a spindle whorl of soft brown-yellow mudstone was found. Trench 37 The plough soil (13) was removed in three 0.1m spits
  • is a good indicator of settlement in the near vicinity. In the case of the test pit T37 prehistoric pottery was recovered from the surface, but there were no sub-surface features of that date. It is impossible to suggest reasons for the soning of the prehistoric material on the surface
  • without more extensive investigation. The séquence from T36 is important. The trench was sited on the highest part of the field, near the top of the slope, yet it has a much deeper stratification than T37 lower down the slope. The buried soil 32, with its charcoal, might represent
  • large Roman settlement which lies 100m to the south east (see fig. 2). In sura , then , this 6m square produced évidence of an early agricultural phase, followed by two phases of Iron-Age activity, and then a later - perhaps mue h later - agricultural phase. Although there is a large
  • was not présent in such quanti ti es. Although the area excavated was so small, it is sufficient to reveal that this zone is of exceptional importance as a long-used settlement area - Iron Age, Roman nearby to the south east, two seigneurial sites hardby (Le Bois Guillaume and La Touche au
  • Roux) documented from eighteenth and fifteenth centuries respect! vel y , with a possible médiéval structure near T36 (see fig. 2). It is potentially of the highest significance for long—terni settlement history and would merit a much more extensive investigation. A92 (Ruffiac
  • and irnplied that p>lough damage was greater than anticipated. 4m of the 6m length of the exposed ditch was excavated: it was steep sided with a fiai, bottom (0.8m deep and 1.3m wide). The ditch sloped down towards the east. It was filied with a silty soil with rounded quartz pebbles
  • of charcoal would suggest a quick and deliberate backfill of this ditch. There was, however, a patch of charcoal (20) in the upper part of 16 at the west end of the ditch. No pottery was recovered from the upper fill but in context 17 were a near-compl ete terra-ni qra bowl with a foot
  • the same corner and was 4.5m long; T44 was eut north from the north-east corner of T28 for 4.4m (fig. 3). In T42 two ditches were located eut into the natural . One (24) was lm wide and about 0.2m deep and was fi lied with a loam (23) similar to the plough soil. The other (39) was much
  • was built and may have been made redundant by its construction - hence the fills. Although, then, excavation of A92 was very limited, it cl earl y demonstrates that. there was a Roman-period building on or near the ridge, which was occupied in the first and second centuries
  • and was destroyed or collap>sed in the second century, with no subséquent occupation of that parti cul ar site. A31/79 (Ru-ffiac ZN 119) A3 1/79 is situated 4 00m north of Petit Madou in Ruffiac; it stretches from the crest of a ridge on the 40m contour down the north-east slope of a small
  • valley. Near the top of the slope and near the valley bottom are two breaks of slope which follow the contours and could therefore be lynchets or river terraces (fig. tf.) . The ancien cadastre shows this area to have been arable in the early nineteenth century. The two fields A31
  • ) by machine in order to understand a feature. The archaeological préservation was of varying quality; features were only located if they penetrated the natural subsoil. On the ridge and top of the slope the features had clearly been truncated by ploughing so that few were deeper than 0.1
RAP00566.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • EAST BRITTANY SURVEY 1986 EAST BRITTANY SURVEY EAST BRITTANY SURVEY EASTER AND SEPTEMBER SEASONS 1986 Easter Season 2 Fi el dwal ki ng at 50m intervais 2 Fi g . A 3 Sampling outside the core 6 7 Fig. B Excavations Al 16 8 Fi g. C 10 September Season Fi g
  • nineteenth century» This latter analysis has been completed and is of parti cul. ar significance for fieldwork because it allows complète reconstruction of the early ni neteenth-century landscape (Astill and Davies 1982a, 1983, 1984, 1985). THE EASTER SEASON The 19S6 Easter season
  • intervais, using collection units of 100m; field EAST BRITTANY SURVEY 1986 | TRANSECT J TRANSECT B "t— TRANSECT D TRANSECT A TRANSECT E -h— .y. : 75 m ■ ci3 " S Y •m .o-v. Tréal Lo 50ml—' O O .... □ ; C? (Rutfiac g SO TRANSECT G l'ï «2. cm. fl\ □ 1-5km apart
  • and also zones that tend to produce more or less of a surface scatter» Surface material is usually markedly absent from areas near the commune boundaries and is also difficult to find in the fields to the north of Qui 1 vain and around Le? Bois Faux; si gni f i cant 1 y , the more
  • intensive covera\ge achieved by rewalking many of the transects did not affect distribution patterns already noted» By contrast , concentrations of surface material are ^frequently found in zones around Le Cleu, La Touche (east of Treal) and - especially - in the southern half
  • near the northern boundary of Transect D (a Roman road) and in the nei ghbourhood of Marsac , La Ruaudaie and La Roche Pèlerin» Analysis of the spatial distribution of imported local schi stes » parti cul arl y those used for roofing material s in the area, produces some equally
  • y managed landscapes associated with pet i ts further investigation because such château;-: , also warrant areas tend more traces of earlier landscapes. to préserve Add i t i on al 1 in some parts cadastral land— use, naming and road suggest. former settlement sites (Asti 11 p
  • .Land whiie 14/. were on south-f aci ng and 19.37. on east-facing slopes. Upland concentrât i on s were not especially notable, with only a quarter lying between the 50m and 75m contours (28. IX) 5 almost a half 1 ay between 25m and 50m (49.17.). Somewhat less than a half
  • and their property less dispersed, with more cattle and altogether a more wealthy air; and, despite récent in the core. remembrement , fewer remembrement mounds than Transect M, running slightly south 01 east from the south~-e?ast corner of Carentoir, was bequn, but most of it remains 209 fields
  • in the Boussac/Bramboc/La Buzardiere area and there was very little surface schi ste at ail, of either type, in the Patis de Boussac . In the northern part of the transect grey schi stes were used for roofing, and thèse are évident on the fields; smal 1 quarries, like that near Les Toulans
  • . The first (T7) ran north west from T3 across a slight break in si ope, and the other two (T5 and T6) were eut in order to section the platform near T4 (see fig. C) . The-? sections were cleaned and drawn and features in the bottom of the trenches recorded. The two 6m squares were mai ni
  • from the north-west corner of T4 and eut the edge of the earthwork platform at right angles; the other (T6) was 23m long and ran from the south-east corner of T4 to the southern end of the platform. A section of the whole earthwork was thus obt ai ned . The earliest évidence came
  • and fairly even distribution of médiéval and post-medi eval pottery. Although there were areas of slightly higher concentration, the scatter looked like a manuring scatter.. H145 is a flat field that is located near the crest of an exposed south-facing ridge on the south--west edge
  • of the settlement of Quoiqueneuc in Treal , in the area of a smal 1 n i nth-cent ury monastery. The field is bounded to the north by the main east-west road leading to Quoiqueneuc, and to the west by the road to Le Passai r. The ancien cadastre shows H145 to have been within an area of largely
  • arable land-use and smal 1 enclosures (çl_os) , with two buildings and ? walled yards inside its western edge - since démoli shed. The site of thèse buildings i s presumably now marked by a remembrement mound near the junction of the two road s. Excavation strategy was the same
  • sel f . K446 (Ruffiac ZA106) Ruf f i ac K446 is si tuât ed on the eastern outskirts of Becul eu 1 n
  • (from east to west s T23 , T24 , Iron Age pottery could be T25) , suc h that the areas producing of the trenches were cleaned by hand and tested. The si des part of the plough soil was excavated by recorded; the lowest features located thereby. The trenches were hand, as were
  • was a ragged v-shaped ditch, 1.3m wide and 40cm deep (46), which followed the slope down the valley side -for at 1 east 90m; subsidiary machine eut s (T26, T27) located the ditch on the saine alignment and f ai 1 ed to produce évidence of a tujrn. Both ditches contai ned small quanti ti es
  • schi ste. Dver the bottom had been laid a layer of compactée! schi ste in which there was at 1 east one rut. (64). On this surface accumulated a layer of silt (63), which was in turn covered by soil which had been tipped in from the south edge of the holloway (61, 62). A new surface
  • east of La Hattaie (fig. 4). The field is in a low-lying position and si opes very slightly down to the north. The ancien cadastre shows that H80 was an area of mixed land-use, parti y cultivated in strips but also with 1 an des (uncul ti vated ) and pasture, in small enclosures
RAP03967 (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil à Quiberon. Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de fouille programmée 2020 )
RAP03345.pdf (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil : Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de FP)
RAP01961.pdf (bassin occidental de la Vilaine et centre Bretagne. rapport de prospection inventaire)
  • of the Viking Age Seulement in Haithabu 09,30-10,00 M. Brown Aerial Survey and Designed Landscapes in Scotland 10,00-10,30 P. Horne The Flying Trowel 10,30-11,00 11,00-11,30 Z. Changcun, Y. Xinshi, Z. Bianlu, Aerial archaeological reconnaissance at Yangling, China J.W.E. Fassbinder
  • 11,30-12,00 Coffeebreak - Pause café 12,00-12,30 W. Raczkowski 12,30-13,00 13,00-14,30 J. Bourgeois, M. Meganck & J. Se- Almost a century of Aerial Photography in Belgium. An overview mey Lunch 14,30-15,00 K. Brophy 15,00-15,30 G. Ceraudo 105 Years of Archaeological Aerial
  • Photography in Italy (1899-2004) 15,30-16,00 M. Gojda Ancient Landscapes hidden and visible. Air Survey and Rethinking the History of Space and Seulement in Central Europe: towards a SynIhesis 16,00-16,30 Coffeebreak - Pause café To overcome infirmity: current approaches to aerial
  • archaeology in Poland The impact of aerial photography on Neolithic studies =3 03 16,30-17,00 I. Kuzma New discoveries in Slovakia 17,00-17,30 R. Schwarz Aerial reconnaissance in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany Thursday O CQ 1 0J 09,00-09,30 M. Doneus Aerial Archaeological Prospection
  • & H. Becker M. Schônherr Aerial Archaeology and new discoveries by a flying wing model 11,30-12,00 Coffeebreak - Pause café 3 o CQ —i Q) 3 3 CD 12,00-12,30 M. De Meyer 12,30-13,00 M. Lodewijckx, K. Verfaillie, I. Ro- Aerial survey in Eastern Flanders: a starl
  • Photography and Trenchmaps 15,30-16,00 F. Vermeulen, M. Antrop, T. Wiedemann & B. Hageman F. Vermeulen, G. Verhoeven & J. Semey M. Willbertz 16,00-16,30 Coffeebreak - Pause café 16,30-17,00 Early médiéval fortifiée) sites in north-eastern Poland: a proposai for an archaeological
  • information System 17,00-17,30 J. Miaidun, I. Mirkowska & W. Raczkowski D. Korobov 17,30-18,00 J. Haigh -rom photographs to maps; a collaborative development 15,00-15,30 Ancient lines in the landscape: the use of GIS and aerial photography for the study of ancient roads and field
  • . SanchezPalencia & A. Orejas T. Driver High peaks, deep valleys: Triumphs and challenges in surveying upland Wales from the air 10,30-11,00 N. Andrikopoulou-Strack Protecting the archaeological héritage by using aerial photographs - Chances and limits of an archaeological method 11,00
  • -11,30 Coffeebreak - Pause café 11,30-12,00 B. Cherretté & J. Bourgeois Circles for the dead. An archaeological inquiry into the Bronze Age in Flanders (2nd millennium BC) 12,00-12,30 0. Braasch Tracks and Traces Abroad 12,30-13,00 St. Bôdecker A polygon shaped ditch System
  • at Kalkar - a camp of the Legio I ? 13,00-14,00 Lunch 14,00-15,00 R. Goossens Tutorial: 3D analysis of satellite images for archaeology. The example of Corona, Quickbird, Ikonos and Aster 15,00-15,30 J. Vanmoerkerke Le rôle de la prospection aérienne dans l'archéologie actuelle
  • : exemples de Champagne et de Lorraine 15,30-16,00 P. Gilman & D. Buckley Aerial archaeology is of vital importance in the county of Essex (United Kingdom) 16,00-16,30 Coffeebreak - Pause café 16,30-17,00 R. H. Jones Surveying the Antonine Wall: Digital Intégration and Research
  • 17,00-17,30 M. Ziolkowski Photographie aérienne et satélitaire et prospection archéologique dans les Andes Centrales. 17,30-18,00 Final considérations - B. Bewley & J. Bourgeois S. Aleksejchouk 3D GIS in archaeology (Comprehensive approach in reconstruction of archaeological
  • fermes indigènes? mey G. Ceraudo Photogrammetry addressed to archaeology: the city map of Aquinum (Lazio - Italy) W. De Clercq & J. Semey And what about the farms ? Assessing the "aerial visibility" of the early historié seulement areas in the North-Western part of Flanders M. De
  • Meyer Archaeological Research using Satellite Remote Sensing Techniques (Corona) in the Valleys of Shirwan and Chardawal, Iran M. Doneus & G. Scharrer Archaeological Feedback of the Aerial Archaeological Interprétation of an Early Médiéval Graveyard in Frohsdorf, Lower Austria. W
  • . Gheyle, J. Bourgeois, R. Goos- CORONA satellite imagery used for archaeological survey and detailed mapping of remote areas (Allai, Russia). sens, A. Dewulf & T. Willems M. Gautier Fermes antiques et parcellaires associés révélés par la photographie aérienne en Bretagne intérieure R
  • la voie Rennes (Condate) - Angers (Juliomagus) B. Sittler, R. Siwe & M. Gùltlinger B. Stichelbaut Assessment of ridge and furrow by using airborne laser altimetry. Preliminary insights of a pilot study of an ancient field System fossilised under woodlands near Rastatt in South
  • -West Germany Aerial photographies from the First World War: a contribution to the World War-archaeology in Belgium M. Willbertz Was ist eine Fundstelle? Qu'est-ce qu'un site? What is a site? H. von der Osten-Woldenburg Différent numerical and visual concepts for combining aerial
RAP00563.pdf ((56). l'arrondissement de Vannes. rapport de prospection inventaire)
  • direction et 33 EAST BRITTANY SURVEY 1982 i i / i \ Carte A : Localisation de la zone étudiée. ■—■ —- major geological boundories transect A transect B 5 km 34 le code des -unités de ramassage et le nom des prospecteurs. Ces fiches étaient remplies sur le terrain. Un examen
  • le cadastre du dixneuvième siècle indique un groupe de maisons inhabitées mais où l'on ne voit plus rien aujourd'hui, nous avons découvert une proportion de céramiques paraissant fort élevée si on la compare à celle des briques et des 36 EAST BRITTANY SURVEY 1982 tOOm «T
  • communes concernées ainsi que l'indulgence et l'intérêt dont ont fait preuve les agriculteurs. Les Universités de Reading et de York, VUniversity Collège (de l'Université de Londres, le Colt Fund de la Society for Médiéval Archaeology et un donateur anonyme, ayant versé une contribution
  • leur devons énormément, ainsi qu' à tous les autres. Grenville ASTILL Department of Archaeology University of Reading Whiteknights Park READING RG6 2AA Wendy DAVIES Department of History University Collège Gower Street LONDON WC1E 6 BT NOTES 1/ Cf. Archéologie en Bretagne, les
  • (Morbihan), Archéologie en Bretagne, 2, 1974, 27-34. ASTILL and Astill, G. and Davies, W., The "Châteaux" Landscapes of Ruffiac DAVIES and Carentoir (Morbihan), ( f orthcoming) . BERTRAND LUCAS, Bertrand, R. and Lucas, M., Un village côtier du Xlle siècle en Bretagne : Pen-er-Malo
RAP01768.pdf (le mésolithique en Bretagne. rapport de projet collectif de recherches)
RAP01858.pdf (les sites mésolithiques en Bretagne. rapport de 1re année de projet collectif de recherche)
RAP03817 (QUIBERON (56). Beg er Vil : un habitat de chasseurs-cueilleurs maritimes de l'Holocène. Rapport de FP 2019)
RAP02901.pdf (LARMOR-BADEN (56). Gavrinis : à la recherche des représentations d'une tombe à couloir du IVe millénaire. rapport de fp 2013)
  • de 2,3 m de haut et 1,2 m de large, et un poids estimé à 4t). Irlande On portera une attention particulière aux travaux menés dans la vallée de la Boyne que nous avions déjà citée dans notre état de l’art (Boyne Valley Landscapes Project), en ceci qu’ils prolongent la dynamique du
  • Archaeological Trust), d’autant que le bois daté à livré une date inhabituelle pour ce type de représentations (6270 BP). L’étude montre qu’il ne s’agit pas de marques naturelles ou faites par des insectes mais bien d’une gravure anthropique, d’ailleurs comparée aux signes de Gavrinis. Si
  • l’objet en 2012 d’une numérisation non précisée. L’environnement a également bénéficié d’un enregistrement LIDAR. Un programme financé par Baillie Wind Farm à hauteur de £100,000. http://www.londonwired.co.uk/news.php/1417820-Neolithic-horned-cairns-near-Caithnesswind-farm-scanned
RAP00129.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport de sondage et de prospection-inventaire.)
  • Galliou Institute of Archaeology., University of Oxford and Centre de Recherche Breton et Celtique, University of Brest The e x c a v a t i o n o f 1991 The s i t e o f Le Yaudet i n t h e Commune o f P l o u l e c ' h (C d'A) occupies a promontory j u t t i n g o u t i n t o t
  • south-west, east. outcrop, Les Rochers de t o t h e c l i f f edge a t the n o r t h ­ The e n t r a n c e p r o b a b l y passed around t h e n o r t h - e a s t end o f t h e rampart, a p o s i t i o n taken now by t h e modern road. The headland i s occupied by t h e core o
  • the archaeological i n v e s t i g a t i o n s and casual d i s c o v e r i e s and from t h e h i s t o r i c a l r e c o r d (De La B o r d e r i e 1853, 1896; Fleuriot considerable h i s t o r i c a l 1954b) t h a t Le Yaudet i s a site of potential: the promontory has produced
  • landscape l i e s t h e s t r u c t u r e o f t h e settlement and i t s economic hinterland dating t o the f i f t e e n t h and s i x t e e n t h c e n t u r i e s . . _ The p r e s e n t r e s e a r c h The design e x c a v a t i o n s o f 1991 were designed t o answer a l i
  • be determined? W i t h these o b j e c t i v e s i n mind a j o i n t F r a n c o - B r i t i s h e x c a v a t i o n was mounted o r g a n i z e d by Le Centre de Recherche Bretonne e t C e l t i q u e , U n i v e r s i t y o f B r e s t and t h e I n s t i t u t e o f Archaeology, U n
RAP00564.pdf ((56). l'arrondissement de Vannes. rapport de prospection inventaire)
  • 251 PROSPECTIONS ARCHEOLOGIQUES DANS L'EST DE LA BRETAGNE: LE BASSIN DE L'OUST ET DE LA VILAINE par Grenville ASTILL* et Wendy DAVIES** * Department of Archaeology .University of Reading. ** Department of History .University Collège, London Le programme de prospections en
  • de l'habitat et les pratiques agraires lors d'une période antérieure aux vastes changements entraînés par le développement des techniques agricoles modernes. .' 252 EAST BRITTANY SURVEY 1983 0 THANSECT C TRANSECT ▲ • + ■ sitw A» ^ □ probable 5km F TRANSECT Q *^ \ sitt
  • et repéré 79 "sites possibles", 50 "sites probables" et 32 "sites (Cf Figure 2). Environ L% des céramiques recueillies datent de l'époque romaine, 67% du 256 EAST BRITTANY SURVEY 1983 Figure 3 257 Moyen-Age et 29% des siècles postérieurs; il y a certes quelques silex dans le
  • millénaires. (Traduction : Patrick GALLIOU, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest) Notes. Cl) On consultera également : G.G. ASTILL,W.DAVlES,"Fieldwalking in East Brittany, 1982", Cambridge Médiéval Celtic Studies, IV , 1982, 19-31 ;id. , "Un nouveau programme de recherche sur le
  • mensuel de la Société Polymathique du Morbihan, n°1467 ,CX, 1983. EAST BRITTANY SURVEY A116 D142 B319 MEDIEVAL POT TER Y MEDIEVAL POTTERY MEDIEVAL D153 PHOSPHATE POTTERY MEDIEVAL POTTERY è en co PHOSPHATE KEY pottery:• • • • • phosphate > • 100-350 • 400-650 • 700-950 ppm
RAP03316.pdf (PLOUHINEC (29). Ménez-Dregan 1 : des Prénéandertaliens aux Néandertaliens à l'extrême ouest de l'Europe. Rapport de FP)