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RAP00568.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • pottery (maximum 5 sherds per square) was more evenly spread. Smal 1 quanti ti es of brick and tile (maximum 0 .5kg per square) were uhevenl y distributed, but tended to concentrate in the south of the field, away from the cl Lister i ng of pre—médiéval and médiéval pottery
  • o-f the trench because o-f lack of space for the spoil, so the trench was reduced in size to 6 X 3m. The pottery from this layer (2), like the stone fragments, provides a complète contrast with that of the plough soil. 61 sherds were found, ail of which were Irôn Age, the most
  • . The range o-f pottery recovered -from the top two spits was very différent -from the lowest spit. In the first twenty centimètres 45 sherds were -found; médiéval pottery predominated (837.), -followed by post-medi eval (157.) and a single sherd o-f Roman pottery (27.) ; 52 -fragments o-f
  • -orange clay (24) from the surface of which came 20 sherds of Iron-Age pottery, the majority of which were of Fabrics 86 (607) and 89 (257). There was no sign of feat ures eut into this layer, which 1 ay directly on the degraded, manganèse— stai ned , quartzitic bedrock (05a) (33
  • ) . Comment The occurrence of médiéval and post-medi eval pottery in the plough soil, but not beneath , and the lack of conte;-; ts of thèse période would suggest that this matériel was not deriyed from SLib— surface features. Manuring might wel 1 account for the evenly distributed
  • is a good indicator of settlement in the near vicinity. In the case of the test pit T37 prehistoric pottery was recovered from the surface, but there were no sub-surface features of that date. It is impossible to suggest reasons for the soning of the prehistoric material on the surface
  • Roman site in the vicinity, and a few sherds in the topsoil, there is no trace of Roman settlement on this field and little to suggest Roman agricultural use. Présent évidence might suggest that the médiéval pottery in the plough soil derived from very heavy manuring, although
  • material was obtained from T29 (as was reflected by the results D -f the total collection) but more Roman pottery was found. Time ran ont and the sites had to be backfilled at the point, when ditches were recognised (Asti 13. and Davies 1987, 118-21). In 1988 the excavation was resumed
  • of charcoal would suggest a quick and deliberate backfill of this ditch. There was, however, a patch of charcoal (20) in the upper part of 16 at the west end of the ditch. No pottery was recovered from the upper fill but in context 17 were a near-compl ete terra-ni qra bowl with a foot
  • that this ditch was filled (and perhaps eut) at a later date than ditches 5 and 10. Indeed it may have been filled during the 9 destruction o-f the buildings. Comment The fabric and forms of the pottery, similar to the material from HSO (excavated in 1986: Asti 11 and Davies 1987, 120-1
  • ) and A31/79 below, suggest a firstand second-century date for the occupation of the nearby, but still unlocated, structure. The later ditch (11) was filled with structural material from this building. The absence of post-second-century pottery from the excavations and fieldwalking
  • and post-medi eval pottery was of a modérât e quanti ty (maximum 5 sherds per square) and appear ed to be evenly distributed over the field, and derived from manuring. It therefore seemed likely that the brick and tile concentration might indicate an isolated settlement, unrelated
  • ned four' sherds of southern Gaulish Sami an , and one of grey coarse ware (Fabric 37). The most northerly ditch (55) was 0.9m wide and 0.4m deep, and from its fill (54) came three pièces of tile (Fabric 1). In so far as can be seen in a narrow trench, the three ditches appear
  • of the plough soi 1 (47, 48) varied -from 0.15m at its south-west end to 0.46m at the bottom of the slope. As with the other trenches, ail -features were eut into the natural clay subsoil (28) and had fills that seemed to be derived -from the pl ough soi 1 . The southern part o-f the trench
  • tile (Fabric 1, 0. 778kg) . Another, smaller pit (27) had been eut into this fill (1.35m in diameter, 0.1m deep), and the fill (26) of this pit contained 1 sherd of late Ir on-Age/ear 1 y Roman pottery (Fabric 13). Farther down the slope (8m from pits 44 and 27) were three
  • ). There was a sub-rect anqul ar pit në;
  • there was a ditch terminal (34), 0.62m wide and 0.25m deep. The fill (33) produced the largest collection of pottery from the site - 25 sherds. The majority (13) were of a late Iron-Age/earl y Roman fabric (Fabric 12) , but there was also a terra-ni qra-type base D -f a bowl (Fabric 65), a rim
  • with médiéval pottery wouid suggest that the scatter of médiéval pot recovered in f i el dwal k i ng , and the 6 sherds recovered from the plough soi î , were not produced by occupation of this location. The earthwork on the upper slope of the field may be a 1 yhchet that was produced after
  • . The pottery was abraded, which implies that some time and/or distance separated its use as pottery from its place of déposition in A31/79. Now, the pits were largely confined to the ridge while a séries of approx i mat el y parai lel ditches, most with the same profile, extended from
  • , it looks as if the field was used for agriculture at a time when firstand second-centur y pottery was being discarded; in this case the ditches are likely to have been field or enclosure ditches of the first and/or second century. It is clear from the worn condition of the pot
RAP00566.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • the ancien cadastre , as usua 1 . More than three-quarters of concentrations of pottery (76.7V.) 1 ay more than 100m away from early n i net eenth-century settlements and only 12» 5% 1 ay within 50m of them» (The former is only slightly higher than distances from modem settlements
  • were walked (of which to be covered (see fig. B) » hectares (18% of the surface area 6 were in M), encompassing 257 of Transect N) . 7.86kg of pottery and 13.81kg of man-made building material were recovered from thèse transects; 1.37. of the pottery was pre-Roman „ 1% Roman, 29.7
  • with plough soil. A small négative feature, 20cm wide, was also noted in section. Neither feature produced finds. The pottery from the plough soil of bot h T3 and T7 was entirely médiéval, and of a similar character to that recovered from the surface, that is 907. coarse wares of fabric 1
  • from the north-west corner of T4 and eut the edge of the earthwork platform at right angles; the other (T6) was 23m long and ran from the south-east corner of T4 to the southern end of the platform. A section of the whole earthwork was thus obt ai ned . The earliest évidence came
  • and were 14cm and 20cm (contexte 4 and 5 respecti vel y ) deeps eamples for pollen and soil analysis were taken from context 5» No finds were recovered from the features, but four sherds of pottery came from the surface of the ditch fillings, whose ■fabrics were différent from those
  • represent the; original soil which formed the lynchet» A column of saimples was taken through the de;posits for soil analysis. Pottery from the colluvium was médiéval, similar to that recovered from the surface and from the other trenches; the majority were coarse wares (547. of fabric 1
  • from fieldwalking» The T4 features were excavated in an area where there was a small amount of médiéval pottery and high phosphate concentrations» While the small quanti ty of pottery is commensurate with the agricultural nature of the médiéval land-use, the high phosphates around
  • ) to check the négative results from Ti 1 and T9. The sections of the trenches were cleaned by hand and recorded. In ail some 50 working days were spent on site? the average size of the team was seven. Trench 9 The plough soil was excavated in 10cm spits. The amount of pottery decreased
  • médiéval pottery to the rier t h classify the two fields as a 'site'. In March 1986 intensive surface collection was rnade from most of the two fields. The distribution of médiéval and post-medi eval pottery on K446 was of a 1 ow and even density, although there appeared to be more
  • (from east to west s T23 , T24 , Iron Age pottery could be T25) , suc h that the areas producing of the trenches were cleaned by hand and tested. The si des part of the plough soil was excavated by recorded; the lowest features located thereby. The trenches were hand, as were
  • produced no finds. However seven abraded body sherds of Iron Age pottery were recovered from the surface of the .natural . Trench 24 of the plough soil ranged from T24 was 81m long, and the depth the si ope. The clay 15cm at. the top to 1.0m at the bottom of ow the plough soil
  • , and Subsoil and schiste I ay i mmed i ai t e 1 y b e (45) . At the eut into this natural s e v e r a 1 f e a t u r e s had been 35cm deep (44) , southern end a v shaped diteh, 60cm wide and produced two médiéval pottery sherds (fabric group 1). The most K446 prominent feature
  • pottery are, however , likely to be an indicator of occupation (see also HSO) . In fieldwalking the ' greatest amount o-f this pottery came -from the areas eut by T24, the trench that produced the most convincing prehistoric -features. The long ditch in this trench could be one si de o
  • -f an enclosure, but the -failure to -find a turn would argue against this, and may suggest that it was eut merely to drain the land. The mixed date range o-f the potteryfrom this ditch makes it impossible to suggest a firm date for i t. The évidence for a holloway, replaced
  • by a métal led road, is particularly interesting. It demonstrates that the routes into Becul eu have changed. More importantly, the pottery from the holloway and associated ditch gives an indication that the earlier route was in use in the médiéval period» Thin section analysis of the si
  • a 1 ow and even scatter of médiéval and post-medi eval pottery; small quanti ties of Iron Age pottery were also recovered (not more than two sherds from a five-metre square), most coming from the western third of the field. Médiéval and post-med i eval pottery distribution
  • suggested a manuring scatter; that of the Iron Age was possibly derived from occupation (cf. A116). The aim of the excavation was therefore to test. thèse suggestions. The even nature of the médiéval pottery distribution meant that there was no obvions area for excavation, and so
  • the first trench was placed over one of the 'concentrations' of Iron Age pottery. Initial ly ai 6m square (T15) was excavated as at Al 16, A92 and H145, and then five trenches (1 mètre wide) were eut north-south across the field at 30m intervais using a machine (from west to east. T16/17
  • . The détail* of the pottery excavated, compared with that recovered by field walkinq, is tabula\ted below» The increase of prehi stor i c material with depth would argue that. it was derived from subsoil features of that. daite. Rock fragments, of which 307. were roofing slate and 507
  • produced the greatest amount of prehistoric material from the whole site. The 1 owest fill (45) produced 11 pièces of tile (0.365kg) and 8 sherds of Iron Age pottery (0„120g). Layer 57 overlay 45 and produced no finds. 22 overlay this and contained 60 pièces of daub (0.168kg) , 30
RAP00565.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • covered, encompassing 772 hectares (4.01% of the surface area of the four communes). 30.99kg of pottery and 93.92kg of man-made building material were recovered from the transects; 45% of the pottery was médiéval, 53.6% post-medieval and 1.4% Roman. No pre-Roman pottery was found
  • in the Coet Morel /Hôtel Orl and area (Carentoir). Surface material is markedly absent from fields on the northern and southern boundaries of L, on the east/west ridges (particularly on a band north west of Carentoir) and - as might be expected - on most steep slopes. There are again
  • was recorded, the field being the same size and shape as at présent but divided into bandes; an area of 1 ande lay to the north and the nearest settlement (La Boulardaie) lay 130m away. Pottery, building material and schi ste were collected from an area of 1 hectare, distributed ail over
  • . As with field 0221, this cl ustering was sufficiently pronounced (and sufficiently distinct from the distribution of médiéval and post-medieval pottery) to suggest that a Roman-period structure once stood on the field. Magnetic susceptibil ity readings produced unusually high values
  • the same alignaient as the lynchet. The ditch was fi 1 1 ed with a homogeneous silty loam which contained two sherds of médiéval pottery and two pièces of (? médiéval) tile. The fill of the ditch was indistinguishable from the overlying thick 1 ayer of loam, which constituted the main
  • and tile coul d indicate that this happened before brick and tile were in common use. Both trenches have shown that lynchets could have a complicated history, with their origins in other features. From the point of view of land-use history, the pottery suggests that this area of Ruffiac
  • commune was intensively cultivated from the 1 ater twelfth century (although small amounts of earlier pottery could reflect earlier activity), while the absence of early post-medieval wares suggests a lapse in arable cultivation during the early modem period or changes in manuring
  • it was exploited as meadow, apparently in the early post-medieval period. The range of pottery found in both field boundaries reflects closely that recovered from 'total' collection of Allô. The désertion of the médiéval settlement may have been connected with the remodelling of this area when
  • of the building, especially inside and immediately outside its walls, there were higher levels of 26-37 Si/kg and 200-300ppm. The experiment suggests that we might expect structures and middens in the study area to produce relatively high levels. Pottery from the 1984 season has been sorted
  • with that generated by survey undertaken around St Malo by the Centre Régional Archéologique d'Alet. Similarities in some of the médiéval fabrics were noted, and there was a striking visual similarity between fabric 10 and pottery from a kiln found at Guipel ( 1 1 1 e et Vilaine). The kiln
  • and cadastral settlements. In the particular case of Roman wares, only small quantities have been recovered and the 'total' collections made from D221 and B347 both suggest that Roman sites generate little pottery on the surface, though they may produce large quantities of brick and tile. 0f
  • collection; phosphate analysis and soil magnetic susceptibil ity survey of the four selected areas; and excavation of part of a bank and lynchet near a field from which 'total' collection had previously been made. Three days (21-23 March) were spent in préparation by three people
  • ; the main team (consisting largely of past and présent students from the Universities of London and Reading) numbered twenty-two, including the directors; it worked for twel ve days, from 24 March, and had one day off; nine people (including one director) remained for an additional week
  • , but sixteen worked flints were recovered, three from transect L, three from C and ten from F, and also a stone axe, the stone of which has yet to be identified (F117). Two possible areas of ridge and furrow were noted, along with fourteen lynchets and eight (mostly substantial) old banks
  • cadastre, as usual. More than three-quarters of the concentrations (80.2%) lay more than 100m away from early nineteenth-century settlements and only 7.5% lay within 50m of them. (This is not signif icantly différent from distances from modem settlements). Surface material tends
  • , concentrations of surface material were most frequently found in the basin to the south of Ruffiac village (the centre of L) and in the nei ghbourhood of Trignac, in the north of Carentoir commune (F); however, sites were common throughout the southern halves of F and C, particularly
  • or schi ste; the imported material is notably absent from fields cleared of woodl and since the 1 ate nineteenth century. Fieldwalking in 5m squares ('Total' Coll ecti on ) In order to investigate the nature of sites identified in transect walking, as in 1983 and 1984 some fields
  • and post-medieval pottery; 0221 had been classified as a 'possible site', with a prépondérance of médiéval pottery in an assemblage that included Roman wares; B216 was a 'blank' field which had produced no finds; B347 was classified as a 'site 1 , with Roman pottery predominating. Soil
  • samples for future phosphate analysis were taken from the topsoil in ail squares, at 5m intervais, and soil magnetic suscepti bi 1 i ty readings were also taken at 5m intervais, at the spot from which samples had been lifted. Fluxgate gradiometer readings were not taken since 1984
  • tests suggested that thèse were only useful if taken at much narrower intervais. Schiste was collected, totally from A107, D221 and B216, and in a limited sample from B347 (from one square in every nine). This was subsequently classified in three colour catégories (black/grey, green
RAP00567.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • of pottery, 161.72kg of man-made building material, 23 from thèse flints and 611.72g of haematite were recovered transects , together with two worked pièces of quartz (from M). This breaks down, by transect, as follows: Brick/tile kg 18. 49 P M 121 . 77 21 . 46 R Pre-Rom. Pottery 1 . 47
  • of surface scatters Di scussi on Clearly the character of the surface material differs from transect to transect. Transects P and M had areas which produced a little pre-Roman pottery - as had Transect N - a phenomenon that is extremely rare in the core communes (Asti 11 and Davies 1986
  • for its very 1 ow proportions of médiéval pottery and very high of post-medi eval . Thèse results are striking by comparison with patterns of material recovered from the four core communes. Whereas the amounts of Roman material collected from the surface are mue h the same, the amounts
  • and proportions of médiéval material are 1 ower (especially in R) - as in N - while those of post-medi eval material are considerably higher, though not as high as in N; in the core 507. of pottery collected from the surface was médiéval and 46.77. post-medi eval . The proportion
  • on the north-east side of the high land near the Carentoi r /Combl essac boundary and none by the wood in the Lande de Craon, both areas lacking surface pottery too. There was little or no pink material on the western and south-western si des of this high land, and none from Couè'dillan
  • by smelting iron ore in shaf t f urnaces; that from R9, however, weighed 2kg and came from the bottoms of bowl furnaces; first- and second-century pottery was collected from the surface in this 6 area. This season 's work has produced several indications that the core communes
  • samples from the 198é> excavations has been undertaken by Anne Gebhardt, under the supervision of Marie-Agnès Courty. Analysis of pottery fabrics has continuée), the sorting and classification of fabrics from the three 19B6 seasons now being half completed. Further work on local
  • years, took place from 20 March - 4 April in the communes surrounding Ruffiac, Treal , St-Ni col as-du-Tertre and Carentoir, in the departments of Morbihan and 1 1 1 e-et-Vi 1 ai ne in eastern Brittany. The aim of the study is to détermine when, how and why the exploitation
  • landscape
  • , Reading, Cardiff and York) numbered twenty-two, ' including the directors, and worked for twel ve deiys, from 22 March, with one day off. Six people went in advance, and worked for one day beforehand. Overall, 330 mandays were spent on this year ' s season, including travelling time
  • ) Sampling was organized in three 2km transects radiating from the core (P, M and R) and thèse were wal ked in the same way as Transects A to L within the core and Transect N outside it, in 1982-6. Transect P ran due west to the River Oust for 4.1km from the western boundary of Ruffiac
  • (from the area of La Sourigaie to La Houssaie), passing through the communes of Missiriac and Malestroit and the northern outskirts of the town of Malestroit; Transect R ran north east for 7.75km from Trelo to Le Mur at the north-east corner of Carentoir, passing through the communes
  • there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered pottery, and the usual conventions are hereby used to distinguish between them: fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five or more fragments
  • .) 219 (25.57.) 858 Table 2: concentrations of surface material (percentage of fields walked per transect and in toto) Of thèse concentrations none had predomi nanti y Roman or prehistoric pottery but a small proportion had some Roman or pre-Roman sherds. Some concentrations had
  • : P M R Some Some pre—Rom. Roman 7 . 47. 11 . 17. 10. 67. 1 . 37. 6. 57. Table 3: Médiéval Post-medi eval 11. 17. 8. 17. 6 . 57. 48. 27. 32.57. 35. 5% Med. + Brick Post-med . 11.17. 18. 57. 3.87. 45.67. 51 . 57. Brick + pottery 11. 17. 107. 6 . 5 "
  • of material (15.67. 'possible', 177. 'probable' and 4.57. 'site'). Transect M itself produced unusually high quanti ti es of brick and tile, and a high proportion of its concentrations were characterized by brick and tile - some of which had Roman pottery associated. Transect R was notable
  • of concentrations characterized by médiéval pottery is much lower than in the core (where it was 54.77.), and that by post-medi eval much higher (20.47. in the core). The overall distribution of material nevertheless shares some characteristics with that in the core. Again there are 'blank
  • . Thereafter, although there are a few 'blank' fields in the nei ghbourhood of Pipriac it is again marked that there are very few from Pipriac east to the Vilaine. The contrast between this area and that to the west of it is very striking. The distribution of material in relation
  • to existing settlements was much the same as found in the core communes, with slightly fewer concentrations at distances above 300m from modem dwellings. In ail cases material tends to occur within 50 and 300m of settlements - in P, for example, 33.37. of concentrations lie within 100
  • used locally for building, especially roofing, materials was also recorded for each field (though not collected). Thèse materials were not carried for long distances (10—20km maximum) but can usually be clearly di st i ngui shed from local natural , and o-f ten have nail holes
RAP03449 ((56). Autour du Golfe du Morbihan, les landes de Lanvaux et le sud de la vallée de la Vilaine. Rapport de PD 2016)
  • of upstanding structural remains including large rectilinear ramparts of probable Iron Age origin, several rough stone buildings and walls from the Mediaeval period. These remains encompass an area c.1ha in size. Recent discovery of Gallo-Romain and medieval pottery indicate
  • The southern corner of a suspected Mediaeval building foundation (17) is evident to the N in the results from survey at Pen Castel. Potential further building footprints may be present to the NE (18 & 19), although these represent weak linear/sub-angular patterns which are barely visible
  • of Muzillac, and on Pointe St-Nicolas at Pen Castel, 2km NE of Arzon, in Département Morbihan (56), southern Brittany (France). Two sites of suspected medieval origin were investigated at Coet Sürho, covering a total 4 survey locations (M1-M4), situated E & W of a minor road. Survey at Pen
  • Coet Sürho: alluvial soils overlying granite and gneiss Pen Castel: rendzinas overlying granite Recent discovery of mediaeval ceramic and building debris at Coet Sürho (Muzillac) suggests the locations of 2 potential medieval settlements dating th th from the 13 -15 century. Survey
  • Castel, échelle 1/1250 2 2.1 ACCÈS, CONDITIONS AU SOL ET CONSIDÉRATIONS GÉNÉRALES Survey in M1-4 at Coet Sürho extended through mainly accessible arable and pasture sloping gently to the N/NE. Complete survey coverage in M3 was made impossible due to obstruction from numerous
  • small-scale ferrous responses are evident throughout the results from both survey at Coet Sürho (M1-4) and Pen Castel. These mostly represent modern ferrous debris contained within the topsoil and are not discussed in the results section of the report unless deemed relevant. Large
  • concentrations of ferrous response at Coet Sürho in locations M3-4 derive from survey in proximity to existing boundaries and farm buildings. Broad regions of ferrous response from survey in proximity to existing boundaries are also evident in the Pen Castel survey results. One substantial
  • /negative responses from natural soil/geological variation also extend throughout the survey results from Pen Castel. The range of this variation has significantly complicated interpretation of the Pen Castel survey results. Client CERAM Coet Sürho (Muzillac) et Pen Castel (Arzon
  • remains uncertain. 3.1.5 3.1.6 3.1.7 M2 No responses of definite archaeological character have been recorded from survey in M2. Poorly defined negatives 11 to the N likely represent variations in soil morphology/geology. M3 No responses of definite archaeological character
  • are evident in the results from M3. Responses of possible interest are indicated, mainly in the central and western region of survey (12 & 13). The archaeological significance of these anomalies is uncertain. Insufficient survey area available in M3 and an abundance of modern ferrous
  • responses has made interpretation of the results from M3 uncertain. M4 No responses of definite archaeological character are evident in the results from M4. Potentially signficant responses are indicated to the NW (14), NE (15) and S/SW (16). Response group 15 to the E may represent
  • of anomaly 17 and W of 23 likely derive from natural soil/geological variation. Further potentially significant responses include a linear arrangement of anomalies (20) running almost parallel with the upstanding Iron Age ramparts enclosing the site; several weak linear © Target Client
  • © Target Interpretation of the results from survey at Pen Castel is highly tentative. The potential that many of the anomalies highlighted from survey in this location derive from soil/geological variation should not be dismissed. Client CERAM Coet Sürho (Muzillac) et Pen Castel
  • locations M2-M3 at Coet Sürho display no responses of obvious archaeological character. Interpretation of the results from M3 has been particularly hampered due to numerous trees which prevented complete survey coverage. 4.3 Interpretation of the results from survey at Pen Castel
RAP01768.pdf (le mésolithique en Bretagne. rapport de projet collectif de recherches)
RAP01557.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport final de synthèse de fouille programmée 1996-1998)
RAP00129.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport de sondage et de prospection-inventaire.)
  • h e Baie de l a V i e r g e , a wide e s t u a r y a t t h e mouth o f t h e r i v e r Leguer. The promontory, r o u g h l y r e c t a n g u l a r i n shape, i s separated from t h e mainland by a deep v a l l e y a l o n g which t h e minor road from Le Yaudet v i l l a g e t
  • h e headland from t h e mainland was u t i l i z e d as p a r t o f t h e d e f e n s i v e system i n t h e pre-Roman p e r i o d by t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a rampart along i t s n o r t h - w e s t e r n edge running from a prominent granite Beaumanoir, a t t h e
  • f t h e a n c i e n t v i l l a g e o f Le Yaudet and t h e r e l i c o f i t s f a r m l a n d , now abandoned. The s i t e was a c q u i r e d by t h e Departement o f Cote du Nord i n 1980, a t t h e r e q u e s t o f t h e Commune, t o p r o t e c t i t from development
  • i s c o v e r i e s made over t h e years have been c o n v e n i e n t l y summarized by L. Pape (1978, ASSASS) t o which may now be added a discussion o f C e l t i c and C a r t h a g i n i a n c o i n s from a n i n e t e e n t h c e n t u r y c o l l e c t i o n thought
  • t o have come from t h e s i t e (Sanquer 1983). Several excavations extensive nature. have taken place b u t none o f an I n 1935 a number o f s k e l e t o n s were d i s c o v e r e d c l o s e t o t h e church (parcelle 29). They were w i t h o u t d a t i n g
  • evidence b u t an e a r l y medieval date seems l i k e l y (Savidan 1935; Mazeres 1936). From 1952 u n t i l 1954 P r o f e s s o r F l e u r i o t examined t h e Roman w a l l a t t h e n o r t h - e a s t corner o f t h e s i t e b o t h west and s o u t h o f t h e Poste de Douane
  • a l (Garlan 1969). Finally, i n 1978, a s m a l l sondage was dug t o examine a c i r c l e , which appeared on an a i r photograph, i n advance o f t h e c r e a t i o n o f a car park. P o t t e r y o f Bronze Age type was r e p o r t e d . It i s c l e a r from
  • the archaeological i n v e s t i g a t i o n s and casual d i s c o v e r i e s and from t h e h i s t o r i c a l r e c o r d (De La B o r d e r i e 1853, 1896; Fleuriot considerable h i s t o r i c a l 1954b) t h a t Le Yaudet i s a site of potential: the promontory has produced
  • d e p o s i t s was l i k e l y t o be good, w h i l e Trench 2 was l o c a t e d t o examine t h e s t r a t i g r a p h y i m m e d i a t e l y behind t h e Roman d e f e n s i v e w a l l . results, as w i l l be apparent from t h e d e s c r i p t i o n The t o follow
RAP02143.pdf (LILLEMER (35). une enceinte du néolithique moyen à Lillemer. rapport final de synthèse de fouille programmée 2003-2005 et de prospection thématique)
RAP02611.pdf (LILLEMER (35). une enceinte du néolithique moyen. rapport de fp et pt)
RAP03661 (HOEDIC (56). Les derniers chasseurs-cueilleurs côtiers d'Europe atlantique et la mort : étude interdisciplinaire de la nécropole mésolithique de Hoedic)
  •  Ancient Genomes: The last hunter‐gatherers and the first  farmers  of  the  south‐western  Europe  from  a  genomic  point  of  view »,  dirigé  par  Mattias  Jakobsson (Université d’Uppsala). Les essais menés à Bordeaux n’ont pas été couronnés de  succès, ceux d’Uppsala sont en cours
  •  of  the  south‐western  Europe  from  a  genomic  point  of  view),  ces  travaux  viendront  clore  l’état  des  lieux sur ce site fondamental pour le Mésolithique européen.        17    Prospections géophysiques    Hoedic, 2018  Le  financement  de  ces  prospections  géophysiques
RAP03300.pdf (RANNEE (35). La Chaussée. Rapport de fouille)
  • layers as well as from the upper fillings of the ditches. In the southern part of the study area, and organized parallel to one of the ditches, a possible semi-circular building (apse) was identified. While the plan is incomplete, the structure is oriented on an east-west axis
  • -hole, pottery, terracotta, instrumentum, metallic assemblage. Vue aérienne de la zone avec le plan masse des vestiges. Cartographie : F. Fouriaux modifié par A. Delalande© Éveha, 2016 (Source : geoportail.fr, Prospection aérienne : G. Leroux). RANNÉE (35), LA CHAUSSÉE RANNÉE (35
  • SAS Éveha 31 rue Soyouz - ESTER Technopole, 87068 Limoges Responsable Audrey DELALANDE Dates d’intervention sur le terrain du 23/02/2015 au 20/03/2015 Keywords Protohistory, Iron Age (second period), La Tène, rural settlement, ditch, post-hole, pottery, terracotta, instrumentum
  • , instrumentum, métal ; Chronologie : Protohistoire, second âge du Fer, La Tène. Keywords : Protohistory, Iron Age (second period), La Tène ; rural settlement, ditch, post-hole, pottery, terracotta, instrumentum, metallic assemblage. Rannée (35), La Chaussée Menée par le Conseil Général de
  • northern-most ditches turn back upon themselves. The organization of the ditches as well as their profiles and depths suggest that they were originally intended to work in pairs, with each pair indicating successive phases of re-construction. Apart from the stratigraphic relationship
  • . The ceramics recovered from the site date between the second and first centuries BC and do not provide adequate detail to refine the chronological history of the various phases of re-construction. In addition, these materials were recovered primarily from non-stratified midden or trash
  • on the landscape today. Overall, the density of structures and artefacts recovered from the study area was relatively low, suggesting a short occupation. 4 ÉTAT DU SITE L’occupation se poursuit à l’ouest et à l’est de l’emprise de fouille comme l’attestent les photographies aériennes de G
RAP01311.pdf (PLOUHINEC (29). menez drégan. rapport final de fouille programmée 1993-1995)
  • appartiennent. Pour une première approche, une méthode indirecte de la biologie moléculaire basée sur l'identification d'une séquence connue dans un mélange de molécules d'ADN, l'hybridation ADN/ADN (type SOUTHERN, 1975), a été choisie. Le principe repose sur la liaison chimique qui se fait
  • .9. x= 40, y=10, z=460> 2 : Une très faible réponse positive spécifique dans des expériences d'hybridation Southern, avec l'ADN génomique du cheval comme sonde, a été obtenue sous des conditions de haute stringence. 3 : La spécificité du signal d'hybridation a été vérifié par
  • . Contrairement à ce que l'on attendait, le rendement était tel que, au moyen d'une hybridation de type Southern, une détermination de la famille zoologique à laquelle l'os appartenait a été possible. Selon ces résultats, l'origine de cet os est apparenté à un animal de la famille des
RAP03053.pdf (CANCALE (35). ZAC des Prés Bosgers. rapport de fouille)
  • remains could be precisely joined to its organization. The southern enclosure, opened east, in part out of the excavation boundaries, has just one enclosure ditch. Except from a well implanted in the intern part of the enclosure, located south of the entrance, and constructed
  • , gutter, way, enclosure wall, kin, hearth, field system, well, pottery, lithic industry, coin, metal objets, architectural terra-cotta. couverture CANCALE (35), ZAC DES PRÉS BOSGERS Conditions d’utilisation des documents Les rapports d’opération archéologique (diagnostic, fouille
  • , hearth, field system, well, pottery, lithic industry, coin, metal objets, architectural terra-cotta. 7 CANCALE (35) – ZAC des Prés Bosgers – 2014 8 2 GÉNÉRIQUE DES INTERVENANTS 2.1 Suivi administratif et scientifique Ministère de la Culture, direction régionale des Affaires
  • , enclosure wall, kin, hearth, field system, well, pottery, lithic industry, coin, metal objets, architectural terra-cotta. Cancale (35), ZAC des Prés Bosgers La fouille de la ZAC des Prés Bosgers à Cancale (Ille-et-Vilaine), s'est déroulée du 10 septembre au 2 novembre 2012. L'équipe
  • des Prés Bosgers excavation have revealed several establishments dated from the prehistoric period to the medieval and modern times. The main occupations are a Roman period settlement, which has known at least three stages of construction, and an early medieval enclosure
  • . The important mixture of founds from the different Roman phases, with the many curing and digging works on the ditches since the Roman period, made challenging the precise dating of the occupations. The material studies show, however, that the two main occupations have been structured
  • in the parcel system associated, and allows to observe the organization of its road network. The main entrance of the ancient enclosure is preserved and an eastern access is built. In the western part of the establishment, a residential building is constructed ; it's separated from
  • collected. In the course of the Early Middle Age, a last enclosure takes place in the southern part of the excavation, recovering a part of the ancient southern occupation. It delivered several fireplaces and many postholes with no particular organization. The Roman well, integrated
RAP03793 (CARHAIX-PLOUGUER (29). ZAC de Kergorvo, Zones 1 à 4, une occupation funéraire du début de l'âge du bronze. Rapport de fouille)
  • or two slabs with rock art, one contain a unique shred of pottery from beginning of Bronze Age and another a set of lithic tools. DONNÉES ADMINISTRATIVES, SCIENTIFIQUES ET TECHNIQUES 5 LOCALISATION CARTOGRAPHIQUE 13 Fig. 1 – Localisation du site dans le département du Finistère
  • Kergorvo-Kerconan is a largest industrial project located on the municipality of Carhaix-Plouguer (29) in center Brittany. Between 2012 and 2018, several archeaeological excavations were conducted by Éveha archaeological institution. Four excavated areas concern some cooking pit from
  • Middle Neolithic and a serie of Bronze age tombs dated from beginning of that period around 2150-1900 BC. Seven burials are organized mostly by pairs, and oriented NW-SE. Each grave is composed of a rectangular pit, inhumation size, containing a wooden trunk coffin or plank set
  • ; résolution : 7 mm). 1. MeshLab Visual Computing Lab ISTI - CNR http:// meshlab.sourceforge.net 2. CloudCompare (version 2.6.1 64bit) [GPL software]. EDF R&D, Telecom ParisTech. Retrieved from http://www.cloudcompare.org 3. QGIS (version 2.18 Las Palmas) [GPL software]. Équipe de
  • développement de QGIS. Retrieved from http://www.qgis.org La création de modèles 3D pour chaque tombe permet l’exploitation des données planimétriques et altimétriques précises, la restitution de profils et de sections, l’illustration et la conservation réaliste des données de fouille, etc