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RAP03967 (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil à Quiberon. Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de fouille programmée 2020 )
  • Guillaume Guérin Nancy Marcoux Marie-France DietschSellami UMR 6566 CReAAH – Ministère de la Culture – CNRS Université de Rennes 1 UMR 6566 CReAAH – CNRS UMR 6566 CReAAH – Université de Rennes 1 IIPC Santander - Espagne Oxford University Ecobio - Université de Rennes 1 IRAMAT
RAP00567.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • éléments) analysis of documents, including the very detailed cadastral maps and records of the early nineteenth century. This latter analysis has been completed and is of psrticular significance for fieldwork since it allows complète reconstruction of the early ni neteenth-century
  • of Comblessac, Guer and Les Brûlais; Transect M ran due east to the River Vilaine for 21.5km front the area of Bat Colin and Le Boschet in south-east Carentoir, passing through the communes of La Chapelle 1 Baceline, Sixt, Bruc , Pipriac and Guipry, and just south of the bourg of Pipriac
  • two groups of 'blank' fields south east and south west of Comblessac. Together thèse zones suggest that the settlement of Comblessac and its immediately dépendent arable may have been rather small, much smaller than the centres in the core communes: it is notable that a tile
  • . In P concentrations tended to lie on south-, south-eastor south-west—f aci ng slopes (48.17.) or on those facing west. (11.17.) - south-west especially; i n M they tended to lie on north-, north-east-or north-west-f aci ng slopes (36.97.) or, southand sDuth-west-f aci ng slopes
  • (23.8%) - north-east especially; in R on east-, north-eastor south-east-f aci ng slopes (37.77.) - east especially. In P 37% lay on -Fiat land, in M 19.47. and in R 22.6%. Ail this is unremarkable in the light of the prevailing local topography. Présence of the imported schi stes
  • material and not pink. Pink schi stes are found, however, in some discrète areas: close to south-eastern Carentoir, in western parts of the Bruc 'blank', in odd fields near Pipriac, around Patis de la Porte, Château La Frèche, La Glonnais, Malon and in small quantities around Les
  • Emailleries. It seems highly likely that most of this transect, beyond its western parts, lay beyond the normal area of distribution of this material, whose source we have recently localized to quarries immediately south west of Guer. In Transect R there were no 'roofing' schi stes
  • on the north-east side of the high land near the Carentoi r /Combl essac boundary and none by the wood in the Lande de Craon, both areas lacking surface pottery too. There was little or no pink material on the western and south-western si des of this high land, and none from Couè'dillan
  • and the western section of M). Some of the Roman fabrics in eastern ti had not been noted before, and included a late Roman roi 1 er-st amped sherd of Argonne ware from M447, near 'Château Gaillard', 2.5km east of Pipriac bourg ■ This ware has an essentially coastal distribution, although
  • was found near Le Boschet, Château de la Boulaye, 'Château Gaillard' (ail in M) and near le Mur (R) . There are, however, two cases of such material being found near (apparently) non-seigneurial settlements 300m from Comblessac in R and 100m from La Rigaudiere, 1km south of Pipriac, in M
  • 's work was undertaken with the author i sati on of the Ministère de la Culture, Direction des Antiquités de Bretagne, and many thanks are - as always - due to M. Le Roux, director of the circonscription, and to the conservateur M. Clément, for their considérable help
RAP00568.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • large Roman settlement which lies 100m to the south east (see fig. 2). In sura , then , this 6m square produced évidence of an early agricultural phase, followed by two phases of Iron-Age activity, and then a later - perhaps mue h later - agricultural phase. Although there is a large
  • was completed in 1987, and a survey of ail standing buildings in the core in 1986. The complète study involves (amongst other éléments) analysis of documents, including the very détail ed cadastral maps and records of the early ni neteenth century. Thèse latter analyses have been completed
  • ; the cadastral work allows total reconstruction of the early rà neteenth- century ] andscape and is of parti cul ar value for the fieldwork programme (Asti 11 and Davies 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987)." The 1988 season involved sample excavation of parts of seven fields (B409, A92, A31
  • century as a metai rie (fig. 2). The field was permanent meadow in the early nineteenth century. In 1982 it was walked at 50m intervais and was classified as a 'médiéval site'; some Roman pottery was also recovered. In 1987 the field was gridded in 5m squares and walked for 'total
  • ' collection. Late IronAge/early Roman pottery was recovered (maximum 6 sherds per 5m square) and this tended to concentrate in two areas in the field. The much larger quanti ty of médiéval pottery (maximum 22 sherds per square) had a si mi 1 ar distribution, while the post— medi eval
  • pottery (maximum 5 sherds per square) was more evenly spread. Smal 1 quanti ti es of brick and tile (maximum 0 .5kg per square) were uhevenl y distributed, but tended to concentrate in the south of the field, away from the cl Lister i ng of pre—médiéval and médiéval pottery
  • ) was si ted in the north-east part of the field where there was a coïncidence of pre— medi eval and médiéval pottery. A test pi t (T37) was also dug in the south west , over a squar e wh i c h had produced n o t. a b 1 e qu ant i t i e s of pre- medi eval pottery and brick and tile
  • was not présent in such quanti ti es. Although the area excavated was so small, it is sufficient to reveal that this zone is of exceptional importance as a long-used settlement area - Iron Age, Roman nearby to the south east, two seigneurial sites hardby (Le Bois Guillaume and La Touche au
  • marks the north b oun d ar y of t h e field. None of the trenches produced structural évidence though the plough soil contai ned large blocks of stone which were cl early derived from a building. It is qui te possible that the buildings were located right. on the ridge, and therefore
  • to that of 10. The finds, though more plentiful, were similar in range: 14 sherds of grey coarse ware jars, 4 sherds of ter ra-ni qra -type pottery, 6 sherds of Iron-Age fabric and two pièces of ceramic tile were found. There was another ditch (11) in the south of the trench, eut
  • valley. Near the top of the slope and near the valley bottom are two breaks of slope which follow the contours and could therefore be lynchets or river terraces (fig. tf.) . The ancien cadastre shows this area to have been arable in the early nineteenth century. The two fields A31
  • ) . At a later stage two further trenches were eut mechanically 30m either side of T39 (T40 to the south, T41 to the north). The sides of the trenches were cleaned by hand and recorded; the lowest part of the plough soil and features were excavated by hand. In one case T39 was extended (T46
  • soil varied from 0.15m on the top of the ridge (the south-west end of T40) to 0.4m at the north-east, down-slope, end. The plough soil (57, 78) overlay the natural clay subsoil (79), into which features had been eut. The shallowness of the plough soil and regular ploughing probably
  • at the bottom of the valley slope. The part of T39 which was on the ridge produced one shallow feature only, perhaps the base of a pit (65: 0.6m wide, 0.1m deep), whose fill (9) produced no finds. Between the brow of the ridge and upper part of the slope (between 30 and 60m from the south
  • of the plough soi 1 (47, 48) varied -from 0.15m at its south-west end to 0.46m at the bottom of the slope. As with the other trenches, ail -features were eut into the natural clay subsoil (28) and had fills that seemed to be derived -from the pl ough soi 1 . The southern part o-f the trench
  • produced several -features. On the highest part o-f the slope there was an irregular pit (44) appro;: i matel y 1.8m in diameter and 0.1m deep, whose -fill (45) produced 1 sherd o-f late Iron—Age/early Roman pottery (Fabric 12), 1 sherd o-f grey coarse ware (Fabric 57) and some roofing
  • interesting to discover that the results o-f excavation here suggest precisely the opposite: early Roman use, both résidentiel and agricultural, and then an interval bef Dre later médiéval agricultural use. ^1 H132 (Ru-f-fiac ZL40) H132 was classi-fied as a 'médiéval site' after
  • 0.3kg per square) of brick and tile. The field is lowlyinq and located 100m east of the Château de la Ruée, to the? east of Ruffiac (fi g. 6). The a n c ien çadas t. r e records this field as permanent meadow in the early nineteenth century but it also shows that it forméd part
  • been landscaped by this time. H132 was under maize and therefore it was impossible to sample the field extensively, as would have been désirable. The f armer, however, kindly agreed to eut some maize early to allow the excavation of a 6m square (T32) . This was placed within
  • the cluster of squares with much médiéval pottery and the stone scatter. When it became clear that structural évidence survived, the area was extended as far as the eut maize would allow to the south and south west (T38) . A test pit (T31) was also dug 15m east of the château in a field
RAP03817 (QUIBERON (56). Beg er Vil : un habitat de chasseurs-cueilleurs maritimes de l'Holocène. Rapport de FP 2019)
RAP00565.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • ; in addition, environmental analysis and a survey of standing buildings is being undertaken. The larger study involves (amongst other éléments) analysis of documents, including the very detailed cadastral maps and records of the early nineteenth century (Asti 1 1 and Davies 1982a, 1982b
  • for walking. The season was therefore especially productive. Fieldwalking in Runs at 50m intervais (Transect Walking) Fieldwalking over large areas was organised within transects running south/north across the communes. L (in Ruffiac), the only transect not yet walked, was completed
  • . The remaining concentrations (25.7%) had a prédominance of building material, at présent treated as undatable. 2 As usual , the topographical position of the sites was analysed. About a third of them (29.4%) were on flat 1 and while 17.1% were on south-facing and 16.6% on south-east-f
  • that are mapped, far less than in 1984, while a further 39% were up to 500m, and 25.6% more than 500m, away; it was largely sites in F that caused this anomaly. Comparison was systematical ly made with the early nineteenth-century pattern of land-use and settlement, as evidenced by the ancien
  • cadastre, as usual. More than three-quarters of the concentrations (80.2%) lay more than 100m away from early nineteenth-century settlements and only 7.5% lay within 50m of them. (This is not signif icantly différent from distances from modem settlements). Surface material tends
  • and in the early 'nineteenth century (Astill and Davies 1982b: 21f, 31). Thèse cadastral suggestions coincided with fields that produced concentrations of surface material at the post-medieval 'site' C470 and, more arguably, the post-medieval 'probable site 1 C473, although no buildings were
  • indicated there in the nineteenth century. One concentration was located in an area which had standing, inhabited, buildings in the early nineteenth century, but which is now devoid of structures or earthworks: F212, a 'possible site' (médiéval and post-medieval ) . Overall
  • , concentrations of surface material were most frequently found in the basin to the south of Ruffiac village (the centre of L) and in the nei ghbourhood of Trignac, in the north of Carentoir commune (F); however, sites were common throughout the southern halves of F and C, particularly
  • /grey and red/yellow) and three sizes (1.5cm) in an attempt to find criteria for distinguishing between local and imported material. A107 lies just below a flat, exposed hilltop on a south-facing slope 75-80m high. The area was arable when the cadastral survey
  • contour in a flat area. In the early nineteenth century it 1 ay on a track and was part of a block of arable in the ' château landscape' associated with La Meule, 125m to the west (a landscape where seigneurial 1 and management introduced distinctive rectangular field shapes, greater
  • in an area that was extensive 1 ande in the early nineteenth century. Previously, there was little to suggest that it was cultivated before the twentieth century and it is clearly in a zone that was marginal for most of the historic period: the nearest settlement (La Bridelaie) is 500m
  • size is 0.44 hectare. In the early nineteenth century it was part of an area of water meadow, 250m from the nearest settlement of Le Cleu. 0.3 Roman sherds per square were collected (2.11g), with 0.4 médiéval sherds (1.63g), 0.31 post-medieval sherds (1.71g) and 2.38 fragments
  • part of the valley, is an area of permanent pasture in which there is a prominent bank and a possible platform (see fig. 2). The bank runs diagonally across the valley bottom. 130m to the west of this bank, at the bottom of the south-facing slope of the valley, is a pronounced
  • lynchet some 1.8m high. This area is near the northern periphery of the Ruffiac commune, and the ancien cadastre indicates that it was a zone of extensive 1 ande in the early nineteenth century. Set within the 1 ande was the petit château of Coetion, with its metai ries (associated
  • conditions prevailed on another three. Excavation therefore had to be more limited than was intended. The excavation strategy was similar to that used by Martin Bell to sample lynchets and valley bottoms in the south of England (Bell 1977; 1983). A 2m-wide trench, 14m long, was eut across
  • of the 18 mètre squares) was dug. Soil samples for micromorphol ogical and pollen analysis were taken in columns from the sections, using purpose-made meta! containers. Small test holes were also eut by machine at every 15m to the north of Trench 1 (up the side of the south-facing valley
  • area, with 11% of fabric 5, a soft cream fabric used for médiéval table wares. There was a small proportion of both Roman and early médiéval types (3% [fabrics 13 and 16] and 2% [fabric 10] respecti vel y; see below, 10). The absence of the highly fired quartz-tempered wares
  • characteristic of the région in the sixteenth to early eighteenth centuries was notable: only 3% of post-medieval pottery was recovered, and that mostly modem. There was no apparent zoning of particular fabrics, which would suggest a constant accumulation of soil produced by near continuous
  • commune was intensively cultivated from the 1 ater twelfth century (although small amounts of earlier pottery could reflect earlier activity), while the absence of early post-medieval wares suggests a lapse in arable cultivation during the early modem period or changes in manuring
  • it was exploited as meadow, apparently in the early post-medieval period. The range of pottery found in both field boundaries reflects closely that recovered from 'total' collection of Allô. The désertion of the médiéval settlement may have been connected with the remodelling of this area when
RAP01768.pdf (le mésolithique en Bretagne. rapport de projet collectif de recherches)
  • pour chaque matière, afin de préciser où se situent les choix techniques (prédilection pour certaines dimensions des supports, pour leur régularité, ou encore pour la productivité des blocs). Le rôle de la géographie sur le développement des cultures doit être abordé avec l'effet de
  • culturelles définies par la culture matérielle (Groupe de Bertheaume, Téviecien). L'exploration approfondie de certains sites semble maintenant nécessaire, pour construire des ensembles archéologiques de référence et affiner le cadre chrono-culturel. Il est également impératif d'obtenir de
RAP03345.pdf (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil : Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de FP)
  • Service Départemental d’archéologie du Morbihan / SDAM) et du Ministère de la Culture (via le Service Régional de l’Archéologie de Bretagne). La Mairie de Quiberon a fourni une aide sous forme logistique particulièrement appréciable et même déterminante pour la bonne marche de cette
RAP02769.pdf (ÎLE-DE-MOLÈNE (29). programme archéologique molenais, rapport n°17, beg ar loued : un habitat en pierres s7ches du campaniforme/âge du bronze ancien. rapport de fouille programmée 2011)
  • ...................................................................................... 31 III – LA CULTURE MATERIELLE................................ 33 A – ETUDE DU MOBILIER CERAMIQUE (L. Salanova*) ............................................. 33 1 – La série céramique 2011
  • .............................................................................................................. 119 D – UN NOUVEL AMAS COQUILLIER SUR MOLENE (H. Gandois) ........................ 120 4 REMERCIEMENTS Nous tenons à remercier pour leur aide et leur soutien : - Le Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication et le Conseil Général du Finistère qui soutiennent notre programme
  • Culture et de la Communication : 7 000 Euros Gestion financière : Association Tumulus, Henri Gandois (trésorier) 7 8 9 LISTE DES PARTICIPANTS NOM BERNARD PRENOM Artus BERNARD BERNARD BOUANCHAUD DECOTE DENIS DONNART DREANO GANDOIS GASLAIN GASLAIN GASLAIN GUEGUEN KERVERN LIETAR
  • sondage. Dès la seconde campagne de sondage, l'opération a pris une autre tournure avec la découverte de structures en pierres sèches laissant augurer la présence d'un bâtiment. Depuis lors, en plus de nous renseigner sur la culture matérielle et l'économie des gens ayant vécu sur
RAP01858.pdf (les sites mésolithiques en Bretagne. rapport de 1re année de projet collectif de recherche)
RAP00566.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • to the south. The stone seems to have been piled into a large irregular pit which had been cut into the natural subsoil (48). It muet represent. collapse from some structure in the vicinity, but the cadastral map shows no trace of any structure or track in the area in the early nineteenth
  • to test results5 complementary envi ronment al analysis is also being undertaken, as is a survey of ail standing buildings in the core. The complète study involves (amongst other éléments) analysis of documents, including the very détail ed cadastral maps and records of the early
  • nineteenth century» This latter analysis has been completed and is of parti cul. ar significance for fieldwork because it allows complète reconstruction of the early ni neteenth-century landscape (Astill and Davies 1982a, 1983, 1984, 1985). THE EASTER SEASON The 19S6 Easter season
  • to be completed on the excavation site» Fieldwalking in Runs at 50m intervais (Transect Walking) A. Within the core Fieldwalking over large areas within the four core communes was organised within transects running south/north across them» Transects A (Ruffiac), D, E, 6 (Carentoir), B
  • possible to see zoning in the présence of thèse schi stes» hence, only black schi stes occurred throughout the ^Ruffiac basin (from Lodineu to Ville Robert and south to La Rivière) and also in a large zone in the north of Transects D and E (from Trelo to La Touche du Mur); in strong
  • material; field E230, where there was also a large tile scatter, provided a parti cul arl y good example of this. Comparison of the distribution of surface material was made with the early n i neteenth-cent ur y p atterri of 1 and -use and settlement, as e v i d e n c e cl b y
  • the ancien cadastre , as usua 1 . More than three-quarters of concentrations of pottery (76.7V.) 1 ay more than 100m away from early n i net eenth-century settlements and only 12» 5% 1 ay within 50m of them» (The former is only slightly higher than distances from modem settlements
  • of mixed 1 and— use. 1 an des (like B2S and D52) and meadow early ni net eenth-century (ilke BS7 and B90) demand some further investigation, since they previous to the nineteenth imply either arable use or settlement century; sites 1 i ke G21S, 220 and 221, lying in the di sti net i vel
  • .Land whiie 14/. were on south-f aci ng and 19.37. on east-facing slopes. Upland concentrât i on s were not especially notable, with only a quarter lying between the 50m and 75m contours (28. IX) 5 almost a half 1 ay between 25m and 50m (49.17.). Somewhat less than a half
  • , transects within the core. Ail available fields Transect for we>re covered; tl 11s ran 10km slightly west of N of from the north-west Ruffiac, and passed north , boundary communes of Carc , Reminiac and Augan the and into the through south oi Zampefrieac, running just to the w est
  • of Augan commune centre, Here there was a marked change in topography - as the and in modem land management — as we moved also in the bedroc north 5 it was with steeper rnuch higher hi 1 1 s and some north/south valleys; but farms (and often fiel ds and houses) were biqger
  • and their property less dispersed, with more cattle and altogether a more wealthy air; and, despite récent in the core. remembrement , fewer remembrement mounds than Transect M, running slightly south 01 east from the south~-e?ast corner of Carentoir, was bequn, but most of it remains 209 fields
  • in the core, and more are on south- (32.7), north(18.47.) and west--facing (12.27.) slopes - again reflecting the h i g h er t op og r ap h y „ Excavations. Al 16 Excavation was designed to sample the medieva\l settlement. of Al 16, located by fieldwalking and classified as a "site
  • from the north-west corner of T4 and eut the edge of the earthwork platform at right angles; the other (T6) was 23m long and ran from the south-east corner of T4 to the southern end of the platform. A section of the whole earthwork was thus obt ai ned . The earliest évidence came
  • by the early post médiéval period (Asti 11 and Davies 1985s 92-5, 97)» If the occupation in T4 is prehistoric then it is the first of its kind for the? région and has important implications for survey work» Its low-lying position, in a wet valley bottom and sealed by 70cm of colluvium
  • and fairly even distribution of médiéval and post-medi eval pottery. Although there were areas of slightly higher concentration, the scatter looked like a manuring scatter.. H145 is a flat field that is located near the crest of an exposed south-facing ridge on the south--west edge
  • working days were spent on site and the average size of the team was six. Trench 25 This was the most westerly trench and was 39m long. The depth of plough soil varied from 36cm at the south, uphill, end to 1.10m lower down the valley side. The plough soil (1, 36) overlay the natural
  • clay subsoil (37), into which features had been eut. A small pit (35) was excavated in the south end of the trench, and a séries of uneven holes, interpreted as root holes (40) , were also found. The remaining features consisted of two irregular spreads of charcoal (39, 43), which
  • schi ste. Dver the bottom had been laid a layer of compactée! schi ste in which there was at 1 east one rut. (64). On this surface accumulated a layer of silt (63), which was in turn covered by soil which had been tipped in from the south edge of the holloway (61, 62). A new surface
  • completely the dépression of the holloway. 6 médiéval sherds came from this layer. A macadamised surface of quartz and bitumen was then laid over the filling of the holloway, and for a considérable distance to the south so that the road was virtually doubled in width (18, 21, 55
RAP02413.pdf (LE CONQUET (29). île de Triélen. rapport de sondages 2008)
  • d'aucun financement public, compte tenu de l'urgence de l'intervention, mais s'était déroulée grâce au soutien de l'AMARAI et de la Fondation Langlois, les sondages 2008 et les études environnementales ont été soutenus par des financements émanant de l'État (Ministère de la Culture
  • Vivante, d'une part et du Ministère de la Culture-SRA Bretagne, en partant du principe que de nouveaux épisodes d'érosion du site pouvaient survenir. Les événements du mois de mars 2008 nous ont, malheureusement, donné pleinement raison ! 10 Typa «agi*tf«»sstei PArlCHλ
RAP02005.pdf ((29). le mésolithique en Bretagne. rapport de projet collectif de recherches)
  • correspond davantage au faciès Beg-er-Vil ; sur le site éponyme, il est daté de 6020 +/-80 B.P (sur coquilles marines). Cette discordance doit nous rappeler que le charbon de Kerliézoc n'est pas associé à une composante particulière de la culture matérielle. Elle ne doit en particulier
RAP02205.pdf (CARHAIX-PLOUGUER (29). un quartier de la ville antique de vorgium. les fouilles de la réserve archéologique. rapport de fp 1 2006)
  • culture matérielle. Elle ne doit en particulier pas être assimilée aux bitroncatures symétriques que l'on retrouve jusqu'à la surface et donc audessus du charbon daté. Cet élément laisse cependant penser que le niveau sous le labour n'est pas entièrement remanié et qu'il conserve une
RAP03187.pdf (QUIBERON (56). Beg er Vil : un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de FP 2015)
  • (Fondation Fyssen/Université de Rennes 1) Jean-Christophe Le Bannier (CNRS-Université de Rennes 1) Guirec Querré (Ministère de la Culture-CNRS-Université de Rennes 1) Laurent Quesnel (CNRS-Université de Rennes 1) Rémy Baniel (Université de Rennes 1) Jorge Calvo Gomez (Université de Rennes
  • occidentale » dirigé par Grégor Marchand. • « Coastal transitions: A comparative approach to the processes of neolithization in Atlantic Europe » dirigé par Pablo Arias Cabal Il nous a donc semblé essentiel de faire dater de nouveaux matériaux et plus particulièrement des échantillons à
RAP03661 (HOEDIC (56). Les derniers chasseurs-cueilleurs côtiers d'Europe atlantique et la mort : étude interdisciplinaire de la nécropole mésolithique de Hoedic)
  •  intérêt pour cette période à l’échelle internationale.  Ces stations venaient clairement démontrer l’occupation de l’Armorique avant l’époque des  dolmens  et  de  belle  manière,  avec  une  culture  qualifiée  à  cette  époque  de  « Tardenoisienne ».     La relation de ces travaux
  • ,  tandis  que  la  culture  matérielle  servait  de  référence  régionale  aux  chronologies.  Ainsi,  le  faciès  Hoedic  désigne  désormais  un  sous‐ensemble  du  Téviecien,  marqué par sa diversité des armatures (triangles scalènes et trapèzes). Une bonne part des  squelettes  ont
  •  Ancient Genomes: The last hunter‐gatherers and the first  farmers  of  the  south‐western  Europe  from  a  genomic  point  of  view »,  dirigé  par  Mattias  Jakobsson (Université d’Uppsala). Les essais menés à Bordeaux n’ont pas été couronnés de  succès, ceux d’Uppsala sont en cours
  •  of  the  south‐western  Europe  from  a  genomic  point  of  view),  ces  travaux  viendront  clore  l’état  des  lieux sur ce site fondamental pour le Mésolithique européen.        17    Prospections géophysiques    Hoedic, 2018  Le  financement  de  ces  prospections  géophysiques