Rechercher sur le site

  • Chercher les documents contenant un mot OU un autre : tapez simplement les mots à la suite => bracelet bronze
  • Chercher les documents contenant un mot ET un autre : utilisez le mot-clef AND => bracelet AND bronze
  • Chercher les documents contenant une expression exacte : taper l'expression entre guillemets => "bracelet en bronze"

Limiter votre recherche

Auteur
Type d'opération
Commune
Département
Date (Année)

1466 résultats Exporter les résultats

Trier par Titre : ascendant / descendant
RAP00565.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • cadastre, as usual. More than three-quarters of the concentrations (80.2%) lay more than 100m away from early nineteenth-century settlements and only 7.5% lay within 50m of them. (This is not signif icantly différent from distances from modem settlements). Surface material tends
  • contour in a flat area. In the early nineteenth century it 1 ay on a track and was part of a block of arable in the ' château landscape' associated with La Meule, 125m to the west (a landscape where seigneurial 1 and management introduced distinctive rectangular field shapes, greater
  • size is 0.44 hectare. In the early nineteenth century it was part of an area of water meadow, 250m from the nearest settlement of Le Cleu. 0.3 Roman sherds per square were collected (2.11g), with 0.4 médiéval sherds (1.63g), 0.31 post-medieval sherds (1.71g) and 2.38 fragments
  • commune was intensively cultivated from the 1 ater twelfth century (although small amounts of earlier pottery could reflect earlier activity), while the absence of early post-medieval wares suggests a lapse in arable cultivation during the early modem period or changes in manuring
  • it was exploited as meadow, apparently in the early post-medieval period. The range of pottery found in both field boundaries reflects closely that recovered from 'total' collection of Allô. The désertion of the médiéval settlement may have been connected with the remodelling of this area when
  • of the last year pollen analysis has been carried out on samples taken during 1984, in particular from buried soils beneath banks in woods near Le Vivier (not far from the excavation site) and Le Rond Point (Carentoir), areas of extensive 1 ande in the early nineteenth century. Although
  • there, with some useful focussing on early modem, pre-cadastral use: the relevant problems are those of distinguishing manuring from settlement scatters and of determining the extent of scatter generated from inhabited buildings (Astill and Davies 1984c: 55-8). It is even clearer that crude
  • no, or next to no, material. As in 1984, even fields with inhabited structures in the early nineteenth century produced no more material than that sufficient to qualify as a 'possible site' (F212); and, as noted above, most of the high concentrations occurred more than 100m from présent
  • and early twentieth centuries. Given that vacated buildings are often left to di sintegrate , collapsed buildings are likely to leave a surface scatter of schi ste; where this is distinguishable from natural, the distinction ought I \ to be noted since the material may be just
  • only; for example, the dense scatters on the long-used fields on the western outskirts of Carentoir have ail three ^colours while the area of the ' château landscape 1 around Gree Orlain and Herblinaie has only black and grey. (In fact, black zones do not seem to be distinct from
  • ; in addition, environmental analysis and a survey of standing buildings is being undertaken. The larger study involves (amongst other éléments) analysis of documents, including the very detailed cadastral maps and records of the early nineteenth century (Asti 1 1 and Davies 1982a, 1982b
  • collection; phosphate analysis and soil magnetic susceptibil ity survey of the four selected areas; and excavation of part of a bank and lynchet near a field from which 'total' collection had previously been made. Three days (21-23 March) were spent in préparation by three people
  • ; the main team (consisting largely of past and présent students from the Universities of London and Reading) numbered twenty-two, including the directors; it worked for twel ve days, from 24 March, and had one day off; nine people (including one director) remained for an additional week
  • covered, encompassing 772 hectares (4.01% of the surface area of the four communes). 30.99kg of pottery and 93.92kg of man-made building material were recovered from the transects; 45% of the pottery was médiéval, 53.6% post-medieval and 1.4% Roman. No pre-Roman pottery was found
  • , but sixteen worked flints were recovered, three from transect L, three from C and ten from F, and also a stone axe, the stone of which has yet to be identified (F117). Two possible areas of ridge and furrow were noted, along with fourteen lynchets and eight (mostly substantial) old banks
  • that are mapped, far less than in 1984, while a further 39% were up to 500m, and 25.6% more than 500m, away; it was largely sites in F that caused this anomaly. Comparison was systematical ly made with the early nineteenth-century pattern of land-use and settlement, as evidenced by the ancien
  • and in the early 'nineteenth century (Astill and Davies 1982b: 21f, 31). Thèse cadastral suggestions coincided with fields that produced concentrations of surface material at the post-medieval 'site' C470 and, more arguably, the post-medieval 'probable site 1 C473, although no buildings were
  • indicated there in the nineteenth century. One concentration was located in an area which had standing, inhabited, buildings in the early nineteenth century, but which is now devoid of structures or earthworks: F212, a 'possible site' (médiéval and post-medieval ) . Overall
  • in the Coet Morel /Hôtel Orl and area (Carentoir). Surface material is markedly absent from fields on the northern and southern boundaries of L, on the east/west ridges (particularly on a band north west of Carentoir) and - as might be expected - on most steep slopes. There are again
  • or schi ste; the imported material is notably absent from fields cleared of woodl and since the 1 ate nineteenth century. Fieldwalking in 5m squares ('Total' Coll ecti on ) In order to investigate the nature of sites identified in transect walking, as in 1983 and 1984 some fields
RAP00566.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • nineteenth century» This latter analysis has been completed and is of parti cul. ar significance for fieldwork because it allows complète reconstruction of the early ni neteenth-century landscape (Astill and Davies 1982a, 1983, 1984, 1985). THE EASTER SEASON The 19S6 Easter season
  • the ancien cadastre , as usua 1 . More than three-quarters of concentrations of pottery (76.7V.) 1 ay more than 100m away from early n i net eenth-century settlements and only 12» 5% 1 ay within 50m of them» (The former is only slightly higher than distances from modem settlements
  • and their property less dispersed, with more cattle and altogether a more wealthy air; and, despite récent in the core. remembrement , fewer remembrement mounds than Transect M, running slightly south 01 east from the south~-e?ast corner of Carentoir, was bequn, but most of it remains 209 fields
  • to the south. The stone seems to have been piled into a large irregular pit which had been cut into the natural subsoil (48). It muet represent. collapse from some structure in the vicinity, but the cadastral map shows no trace of any structure or track in the area in the early nineteenth
  • T15 and T16 clearly do so. Although there is no défi ni te structural évidence, the assemblage coming from the pit group 7 can only be interpreted as settlement débris. The pottery forms suggest a very late Iron Age, or very early Roman , date» The similarity in form and fabric
  • of fieldwork, itself part of a larger, mul t i -di sci pl i nary study of the relationship between land-u.se and settlement during the last two thousand years, took place from 21 March - 5 April and 6 -- 27 September in the communes of Ruffiac, Treal, St~Ni col as-du-Tertre , Carentoir, La
  • to test results5 complementary envi ronment al analysis is also being undertaken, as is a survey of ail standing buildings in the core. The complète study involves (amongst other éléments) analysis of documents, including the very détail ed cadastral maps and records of the early
  • involved fieldwalking over large areas at wide intervais, as in 1982 85, in the four core communes; sampling in the communes surrounding the core? and excavation of parts of a field from which 'total' collection had previously been made. Two days (21-22 March) were spent in préparation
  • for the main season by two people. The team (consisting largely of past and présent students from the Universities of London, Reading, Durham and Sheffield) numbered twenty, including the directors, and worked for twelve days, from 23 March, with one day off. A smal 1 team, of the directors
  • worked flints were also collected, three from transect E, three from B, two from B and one from D. One possible platform and thirty lynchets were noted, of which fifteen were in Transect D. As in previous years there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered
  • and also zones that tend to produce more or less of a surface scatter» Surface material is usually markedly absent from areas near the commune boundaries and is also difficult to find in the fields to the north of Qui 1 vain and around Le? Bois Faux; si gni f i cant 1 y , the more
  • of Transect G, from Métairie au Joly to Le Nouai-)» The figures quoted above demonstrate the remarkably high proportion of fields in G with large concentrations of surface material. The présence of tile scatters, sometimes with smal 1 quanti ties of Roman material associated, were notable
  • possible to see zoning in the présence of thèse schi stes» hence, only black schi stes occurred throughout the ^Ruffiac basin (from Lodineu to Ville Robert and south to La Rivière) and also in a large zone in the north of Transects D and E (from Trelo to La Touche du Mur); in strong
  • contrast black and pink/purple roofing fragments occurred together in zones immediately north of the Ruffiac basin and west of the Trelo zone. It was also possible, in some cases, to distinguish a range of other schi stes that were imported from nearby local sources, probably as walling
  • material; field E230, where there was also a large tile scatter, provided a parti cul arl y good example of this. Comparison of the distribution of surface material was made with the early n i neteenth-cent ur y p atterri of 1 and -use and settlement, as e v i d e n c e cl b y
  • of mixed 1 and— use. 1 an des (like B2S and D52) and meadow early ni net eenth-century (ilke BS7 and B90) demand some further investigation, since they previous to the nineteenth imply either arable use or settlement century; sites 1 i ke G21S, 220 and 221, lying in the di sti net i vel
  • y managed landscapes associated with pet i ts further investigation because such château;-: , also warrant areas tend more traces of earlier landscapes. to préserve Add i t i on al 1 in some parts cadastral land— use, naming and road suggest. former settlement sites (Asti 11 p
  • of the? sites 1 ay within 250m of mapped streams (427.) , while more than a quarter (31.57.) were more than 500m away from them. £< . Samplinq ou.tside the core transects Sampling outside the core was organisée) in 2km radiating from it and thèse were walked in the s ame way as in one
  • , transects within the core. Ail available fields Transect for we>re covered; tl 11s ran 10km slightly west of N of from the north-west Ruffiac, and passed north , boundary communes of Carc , Reminiac and Augan the and into the through south oi Zampefrieac, running just to the w est
  • were walked (of which to be covered (see fig. B) » hectares (18% of the surface area 6 were in M), encompassing 257 of Transect N) . 7.86kg of pottery and 13.81kg of man-made building material were recovered from thèse transects; 1.37. of the pottery was pre-Roman „ 1% Roman, 29.7
RAP00568.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • marks the north b oun d ar y of t h e field. None of the trenches produced structural évidence though the plough soil contai ned large blocks of stone which were cl early derived from a building. It is qui te possible that the buildings were located right. on the ridge, and therefore
  • been landscaped by this time. H132 was under maize and therefore it was impossible to sample the field extensively, as would have been désirable. The f armer, however, kindly agreed to eut some maize early to allow the excavation of a 6m square (T32) . This was placed within
  • , perhaps in the context of landscaping and the change of use to meadow. The c.lean breaks on the pottery do not suggest any long period spent in the plough soil (cleaxrly the rubble destruction layer protected the sherds from modem plough damage). We cannot date eny of thèse pheses
  • of the relationship between land-use and settlement during the 1 ast two thousand years, took place from 25 August - 1 October in the communes of Ruffiac, Tréal , St-Ni col as-du-Tertre and Carentoir, in the department of Morbihan in eastern Brittany. The ai m of the study is to détermine when
  • was completed in 1987, and a survey of ail standing buildings in the core in 1986. The complète study involves (amongst other éléments) analysis of documents, including the very détail ed cadastral maps and records of the early ni neteenth century. Thèse latter analyses have been completed
  • ; the cadastral work allows total reconstruction of the early rà neteenth- century ] andscape and is of parti cul ar value for the fieldwork programme (Asti 11 and Davies 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987)." The 1988 season involved sample excavation of parts of seven fields (B409, A92, A31
  • /79, H 132, 874, L26, D153) from which 'total' collection had previously been made (fig. 1). Of thèse, A92 had been started in 1986 and remained to finish. The ai rn of thèse smal 1 excavations was the investigation of surf ace/'sub-surf ace rel at i onshi ps; fields were selected
  • five-day planning trips by two in September 1987 and April 1988. The team, consisting of volunteers from a wide range of places, numbered twenty-six, including the directors, one finds assistant and three supervisors; it worked for f i ve weeks from 28 August, with four days off
  • , and only two days were lost because of rain; however , the gênerai dryness meant that the ground was hard and made for very heavy working. EBS 88 B409 (Carentoir Zft 161) B409 lies on a west-facing si ope near the settlement of Le Eiois Guillaume, documentée! from the eighteenth
  • century as a metai rie (fig. 2). The field was permanent meadow in the early nineteenth century. In 1982 it was walked at 50m intervais and was classified as a 'médiéval site'; some Roman pottery was also recovered. In 1987 the field was gridded in 5m squares and walked for 'total
  • ' collection. Late IronAge/early Roman pottery was recovered (maximum 6 sherds per 5m square) and this tended to concentrate in two areas in the field. The much larger quanti ty of médiéval pottery (maximum 22 sherds per square) had a si mi 1 ar distribution, while the post— medi eval
  • pottery (maximum 5 sherds per square) was more evenly spread. Smal 1 quanti ti es of brick and tile (maximum 0 .5kg per square) were uhevenl y distributed, but tended to concentrate in the south of the field, away from the cl Lister i ng of pre—médiéval and médiéval pottery
  • , and the majority (577.) of the post-medi eval wares was ni neteenth-century . Smal 1 quanti ti es of brick and tile were recovered but only from the first three spits (total 23 fragments, 0. 787kg) . Context 1, however, had in addition to local quartz and quartzite large quantities (120kg
  • some pièces were 5mm across. This layer varied in thickness -from 0.75m on the eastern, up-slope, side o-f the trench to 0.38m on the west. At the east end the top sur-face o-f 2 curved as i -f the layer had been mounded up. This layer could not be total ly excavated over the whole
  • o-f the trench because o-f lack of space for the spoil, so the trench was reduced in size to 6 X 3m. The pottery from this layer (2), like the stone fragments, provides a complète contrast with that of the plough soil. 61 sherds were found, ail of which were Irôn Age, the most
  • . The range o-f pottery recovered -from the top two spits was very différent -from the lowest spit. In the first twenty centimètres 45 sherds were -found; médiéval pottery predominated (837.), -followed by post-medi eval (157.) and a single sherd o-f Roman pottery (27.) ; 52 -fragments o-f
  • -orange clay (24) from the surface of which came 20 sherds of Iron-Age pottery, the majority of which were of Fabrics 86 (607) and 89 (257). There was no sign of feat ures eut into this layer, which 1 ay directly on the degraded, manganèse— stai ned , quartzitic bedrock (05a) (33
  • ) . Comment The occurrence of médiéval and post-medi eval pottery in the plough soil, but not beneath , and the lack of conte;-; ts of thèse période would suggest that this matériel was not deriyed from SLib— surface features. Manuring might wel 1 account for the evenly distributed
  • is a good indicator of settlement in the near vicinity. In the case of the test pit T37 prehistoric pottery was recovered from the surface, but there were no sub-surface features of that date. It is impossible to suggest reasons for the soning of the prehistoric material on the surface
  • without more extensive investigation. The séquence from T36 is important. The trench was sited on the highest part of the field, near the top of the slope, yet it has a much deeper stratification than T37 lower down the slope. The buried soil 32, with its charcoal, might represent
RAP00567.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • landscape
  • years, took place from 20 March - 4 April in the communes surrounding Ruffiac, Treal , St-Ni col as-du-Tertre and Carentoir, in the departments of Morbihan and 1 1 1 e-et-Vi 1 ai ne in eastern Brittany. The aim of the study is to détermine when, how and why the exploitation
  • éléments) analysis of documents, including the very detailed cadastral maps and records of the early nineteenth century. This latter analysis has been completed and is of psrticular significance for fieldwork since it allows complète reconstruction of the early ni neteenth-century
  • , Reading, Cardiff and York) numbered twenty-two, ' including the directors, and worked for twel ve deiys, from 22 March, with one day off. Six people went in advance, and worked for one day beforehand. Overall, 330 mandays were spent on this year ' s season, including travelling time
  • ) Sampling was organized in three 2km transects radiating from the core (P, M and R) and thèse were wal ked in the same way as Transects A to L within the core and Transect N outside it, in 1982-6. Transect P ran due west to the River Oust for 4.1km from the western boundary of Ruffiac
  • (from the area of La Sourigaie to La Houssaie), passing through the communes of Missiriac and Malestroit and the northern outskirts of the town of Malestroit; Transect R ran north east for 7.75km from Trelo to Le Mur at the north-east corner of Carentoir, passing through the communes
  • of pottery, 161.72kg of man-made building material, 23 from thèse flints and 611.72g of haematite were recovered transects , together with two worked pièces of quartz (from M). This breaks down, by transect, as follows: Brick/tile kg 18. 49 P M 121 . 77 21 . 46 R Pre-Rom. Pottery 1 . 47
  • of surface scatters Di scussi on Clearly the character of the surface material differs from transect to transect. Transects P and M had areas which produced a little pre-Roman pottery - as had Transect N - a phenomenon that is extremely rare in the core communes (Asti 11 and Davies 1986
  • for its very 1 ow proportions of médiéval pottery and very high of post-medi eval . Thèse results are striking by comparison with patterns of material recovered from the four core communes. Whereas the amounts of Roman material collected from the surface are mue h the same, the amounts
  • and proportions of médiéval material are 1 ower (especially in R) - as in N - while those of post-medi eval material are considerably higher, though not as high as in N; in the core 507. of pottery collected from the surface was médiéval and 46.77. post-medi eval . The proportion
  • . Thereafter, although there are a few 'blank' fields in the nei ghbourhood of Pipriac it is again marked that there are very few from Pipriac east to the Vilaine. The contrast between this area and that to the west of it is very striking. The distribution of material in relation
  • to existing settlements was much the same as found in the core communes, with slightly fewer concentrations at distances above 300m from modem dwellings. In ail cases material tends to occur within 50 and 300m of settlements - in P, for example, 33.37. of concentrations lie within 100
  • used locally for building, especially roofing, materials was also recorded for each field (though not collected). Thèse materials were not carried for long distances (10—20km maximum) but can usually be clearly di st i ngui shed from local natural , and o-f ten have nail holes
  • on the north-east side of the high land near the Carentoi r /Combl essac boundary and none by the wood in the Lande de Craon, both areas lacking surface pottery too. There was little or no pink material on the western and south-western si des of this high land, and none from Couè'dillan
  • north east to Comblessac, as also north from Comblessac to the Lande de Craon. The pattern of occurrences of the schi stes in thèse transects suggests that the pink schi stes . i.e. material from the Guer quarries, may wel 1 have been the earliest to be used in the roofing industry
  • and the western section of M). Some of the Roman fabrics in eastern ti had not been noted before, and included a late Roman roi 1 er-st amped sherd of Argonne ware from M447, near 'Château Gaillard', 2.5km east of Pipriac bourg ■ This ware has an essentially coastal distribution, although
  • there are finds from the Rance/ Vi 1 ai ne river Systems and one sherd from Pipriac is already known (Galliou 1977: 91-2). The médiéval fabrics from this eastern région seem to have less mica, fewer spi cul es and more grog. Some of the fields with Roman material are of particular interest
  • was found near Le Boschet, Château de la Boulaye, 'Château Gaillard' (ail in M) and near le Mur (R) . There are, however, two cases of such material being found near (apparently) non-seigneurial settlements 300m from Comblessac in R and 100m from La Rigaudiere, 1km south of Pipriac, in M
  • where a 'temple' is sited (R8) , was observed to have a ploughed-out stone building, apparently unrecorded and suggesting a larger complex of buildings than has previously been supposée) Gai 1 i a 1977). Slag was collected from both R8 and R9; that from RS is tap slag, produced
  • by smelting iron ore in shaf t f urnaces; that from R9, however, weighed 2kg and came from the bottoms of bowl furnaces; first- and second-century pottery was collected from the surface in this 6 area. This season 's work has produced several indications that the core communes
RAP01768.pdf (le mésolithique en Bretagne. rapport de projet collectif de recherches)
  • Mésolithique moyen. Elle souhaite notamment appréhender des vastes sites de plein-air, pour les comparer aux nombreux abris-sous-roche qu'elle a pu étudier dans le Sauveterrien. Lors d'un premier voyage, elle a pu fournir quelques orientations sur les possibilités offertes par les roches du
  • Finistère. Par une première lecture typologique, ils sont datés des périodes épipaléolithique et mésolithique (12000 - 5000 avant J.-C.). Suivant la nature des roches qui y furent débitées, il est possible de distinguer des sens de circulations et des aires d'approvisionnement. Des
  • recherche, si l'on désire avancer dans la structuration de ces indices et dans la compréhension de la complexité des mondes préhistoriques. L'évolution des territoires et des réseaux de circulation au cours de l'Holocène reste à analyser de même que leurs articulations avec les aires
RAP01961.pdf (bassin occidental de la Vilaine et centre Bretagne. rapport de prospection inventaire)
  • Photography in Italy (1899-2004) 15,30-16,00 M. Gojda Ancient Landscapes hidden and visible. Air Survey and Rethinking the History of Space and Seulement in Central Europe: towards a SynIhesis 16,00-16,30 Coffeebreak - Pause café To overcome infirmity: current approaches to aerial
  • . SanchezPalencia & A. Orejas T. Driver High peaks, deep valleys: Triumphs and challenges in surveying upland Wales from the air 10,30-11,00 N. Andrikopoulou-Strack Protecting the archaeological héritage by using aerial photographs - Chances and limits of an archaeological method 11,00
  • of the Viking Age Seulement in Haithabu 09,30-10,00 M. Brown Aerial Survey and Designed Landscapes in Scotland 10,00-10,30 P. Horne The Flying Trowel 10,30-11,00 11,00-11,30 Z. Changcun, Y. Xinshi, Z. Bianlu, Aerial archaeological reconnaissance at Yangling, China J.W.E. Fassbinder
  • Photography and Trenchmaps 15,30-16,00 F. Vermeulen, M. Antrop, T. Wiedemann & B. Hageman F. Vermeulen, G. Verhoeven & J. Semey M. Willbertz 16,00-16,30 Coffeebreak - Pause café 16,30-17,00 Early médiéval fortifiée) sites in north-eastern Poland: a proposai for an archaeological
  • information System 17,00-17,30 J. Miaidun, I. Mirkowska & W. Raczkowski D. Korobov 17,30-18,00 J. Haigh -rom photographs to maps; a collaborative development 15,00-15,30 Ancient lines in the landscape: the use of GIS and aerial photography for the study of ancient roads and field
  • monuments) I. Bourgeois, J. Bourgeois & J. Se- Iran âge monuments in sandy Flanders (Belgium): rectangular ritual and funerary enclosures. A contribution from aerial photography mey I. Bourgeois, M. Meganck & J. Se- Enclos fossoyés de l'âge du fer en Flandre sablonneuse: vestiges de
  • fermes indigènes? mey G. Ceraudo Photogrammetry addressed to archaeology: the city map of Aquinum (Lazio - Italy) W. De Clercq & J. Semey And what about the farms ? Assessing the "aerial visibility" of the early historié seulement areas in the North-Western part of Flanders M. De
  • Meyer Archaeological Research using Satellite Remote Sensing Techniques (Corona) in the Valleys of Shirwan and Chardawal, Iran M. Doneus & G. Scharrer Archaeological Feedback of the Aerial Archaeological Interprétation of an Early Médiéval Graveyard in Frohsdorf, Lower Austria. W
  • . Jarockis & G. Motuzaite Aerial Photography in Lithuania: seven years of expérience D. Krasnodebski Polish Aerial Photography from year ca. 1920 G. Leroux Contribution de l'archéologie aérienne à la connaissance des tracés de routes antiques dans l'ouest de la France - l'exemple de
  • -West Germany Aerial photographies from the First World War: a contribution to the World War-archaeology in Belgium M. Willbertz Was ist eine Fundstelle? Qu'est-ce qu'un site? What is a site? H. von der Osten-Woldenburg Différent numerical and visual concepts for combining aerial
  • , l'essentiel des charpentes médiévales et modernes employant des « ragoles » (émondage de la base au sommet) se trouve dans leur aire de répartition actuelle Des milieux et des hommes : fragments d'histoires croisées I Ukri^piuv^^«(^«KMir*r
RAP00239.pdf ((35). le bassin de Rennes. rapport de prospection inventaire)
  • enclos protohistoriques dans le territoire des Coriosolites, les Dossiers du Ce.R.A.A, 15, 1987, p.9-20. LANGOUET L. ANDLAUER L., DAIRE M.Y. - Le passé vu d'avion dans le nord de la Haute-Bretagne, les Dossiers du Ce.R.A.A., M, 1990, 118 pages. RILEY D.N. - Early Landscape from
  • the air, University of Sheffield, 1980, 149 pages. WHIMSTER R. - The emerging past ; air photography and the burial landscape, Royal Commission on Historical Monuments,1988, 102 pages. ■ 16 ANNEXE Le Projet de projection du « Bassin de Rennes » en 1991. - Carte archéologique
RAP03185.pdf ((22)(29)(35)(56). Les premiers peuplements de l'ouest de la France : dépôts pléistocènes et occupations paléolithiques de la région Bretagne. Rapport de PCR)
  • ., SHAW A., sous presse - Discoveries From La Manche: Five years of Early Prehistoric Research in the Channel Island of Jersey. Archaeology International, sous presse. RAVON A.-L. & LAFORGE M., 2015 - Présentation du PCR: Les premiers peuplements de l’Ouest de la France : dépôts
  • donc à l’ensemble de la région Bretagne, livrant, dans les aires favorables à la conservation de sédiments anciens, les coupes et gisements paléolithiques qui nous intéressent ici. L’importance scientifique du littoral breton est ainsi de nous offrir des données essentielles à la
  • of the Palaeolithic landscape at the western most tip of continental Europe: The shoreline seen by the Menez-Dregan dwellers. Environmental Archaeology, sous presse. MONNIER J.-L., RAVON A.-L., 2015 - Terra Amata et Menez-Dregan. Des industries du Paléolithique inférieur à rares bifaces et riches
  • , Quaternary International, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2015.07.066. RAVON A.-L., GAILLARD C., MONNIER J.-L., 2015 - Menez-Dregan (Plouhinec, Far Western Europe): the lithic industry from layer 7 and its Acheulian components, Quaternary International, sous presse. 5.2
  • for Middle and Upper Pleistocene landscape evolution in the Sussex/Hampshire Coastal Corridor, UK. Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association, 121, 369-392. - BIGOT B., MONNIER J.-L. (1987) - Stratigraphie et sédimentologie des lœss récents du nord de la Bretagne. Données nouvelles
RAP03345.pdf (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil : Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de FP)
  • l’on progresse vers l’est. Dans le carré BH 53, deux aires circulaires de pierres rubéfiées jointives ont été découvertes. Ces deux structures sont collées l’une à l’autre, mais on a pointé certaines de leurs différences. A ce stade de nos observations, et sous réserve de documents
  • coquilles et autres déchets, qui s’est aussi accompagnée de quelques creusements et de l’aménagement d’une aire de combustion de grandes dimensions, impliquant des dalles larges. Par la suite, cette zone a été littéralement couverte de blocs de granite brûlés, peut-être issus de
  • valeur de l’effet réservoir (dans les espaces « clos », notamment sous les blocs). 10. La totalité des sédiments est tamisée à l’eau de mer dans des bacs disposés sur la plage en contrebas, puis rincée à l’eau douce, séchée en plein-air (en évitant le 23 Campagne 2016 soleil). Deux
RAP03240.pdf (PLOUEZOC'H (29). Grand cairn de Barnenez : nouvelles approches, nouveaux résultats, nouvelles perspectives. Rapport de FP 2015)
  • Henares, Madrid, Spain increasing possibilities for characterising and dating pigments.[1,2] Thereby, the more pigments are found within c UMR 6566-CReAAH, Université Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes the megaliths record from such a representative area as Brittany, the Cedex
  • Nanterre La Défense, 21 allée de l’Université, the first time. Six representative megalithic monuments and two stelae 92023 Nanterre, France from Western France have been selected for this purpose, Fig. S1 f Laboratoire d’Archéologie et d’Anthropologie Sociale, Z. A. Les Guigneries
  • , 85320 (Supporting Information). Raman spectra from a large number of points La Bretonnière-La Claye, France may be obtained in situ with portable micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) instruments, thereby avoiding numerous extractions of g Laboratoire TRACES, UMR5608, Université Toulouse
  • Jean Jaurés, Maison de la Recherche 5, allée Antonio Machado, 31058 Toulouse Cedex 9, France specimens.[8,10,12,13] Orthostats Hernanz et al. A. pictorial materials have been analysed by in situ μ-RS. Some microspecimens from carefully selected points have been removed in order
  • are the most representative within the classic sequence of Brittany: chambers A and H from Barnenez tumulus (Plouezoc’h, Finistère), the gallery of Goërem (Gâvres, Morbihan), the monuments from Dissignac (Saint-Nazaire, Loire-Atlantique) or the dolmens integrated inside the tumulus of Mont
  • feasible to restore some of the decorations. The oldest megalithic monuments from Brittany are dated around the fifth millennia cal BC including Barnenez tumulus,[17] Mont-Saint-Michel and other earlier evidences. The stelae from the megalithic quarry of L’Hirondelle (Bois de Fourgon
  • , Avrillé, Vendée)[18] and the one from the Neolithic collective grave from Saint-Claude (Bury, Oise)[19] are included within this timeframe as well. The selected stelae describe the link between anthropomorphic figures and the northwestern Atlantic contexts, on one hand. On the other
  • hand, L’Hirondelle’s site is an outdoor area that proves the presence of open-air decorated complexes way beyond the Mediterranean area. Experimental Descriptions of the instruments used for the μ-RS, SEM/EDS and XPS studies, as well as the protocol used for micro-specimen
  • cap[12] was mounted over the probe head or the objective to avoid sunlight or other external radiation entering in the spectrometer. The spectral range from 65 to 2500 cm-1 (Stokes) was recorded with a spectral resolution s ~3.5 cm-1. Integration times of 2–3 s and 36 spectral
  • of Δνcal–Δνobs = -0.01 ± 0.05 cm-1 (tStudent 95%).[21] The location of some of the points that have been analysed in situ is indicated (red circles) in Figs2 S3–S23 (Supporting Information). Micro-specimens (size ≤ 1 mm ) of the pigmented areas were extracted from the different sites
  • as to assist in determining the wavenumber of the peaks. Halogen lamp spectra from a cold light source Euromex LE.5210 have been used for spectral background corrections. X-ray microanalyses of the extracted specimens have been carried out using an EDS spectrometer Rontec Xflash Detector
  • . Nevertheless, because of their solid consistency, the surface with pictorial materials of the specimens 6 and 1, from the chamber H of Barnenez tumulus and Mane Rutual monument respectively, have been studied with no physical treatments prior to their analyses. The resulting spectral data
  • have been analysed using the CASA XPS software and RSF database for peak fitting and Shirley background correction. The binding energy has been referenced to the adventitious C 1 s peak at 285 eV. Results and discussions Pictorial materials from eight French megalithic sites
  • components of granitic rocks. The SEM/EDS spectra of the specimens 1, 2 and 6 from this chamber reveal a significant content of Mn, Fig. S24 (Supporting Information). The presence of Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. J. Raman Spectrosc. (2015) μ-Raman of prehistoric paintings
  • in italics. Mn in these specimens has also been identified by XPS, Table S1 (Supporting information). Raman spectra of these specimens of black paint from the chamber H, Fig. 1A, show broad bands in the typical spectral region of Mn–O and Mn–OH bending and stretching vibrations (450–800
  • assignment of the representative Raman spectra shown in Fig. 1A is considered next. A very broad and asymmetric band with a maximum at 643 cm-1, Fig. 1A(a), is frequently observed in these specimens. A study on Magdalenian pigments from Grottes de la Garenne (France) assigned this band
  • to cryptomelane,[37] in disagreement with UV Raman data for this mineral.[25] This band could also be assigned to todorokite,[24,38] pyrochroite[4,38] and manganosite.[22] A multi-peak Lorentzian curve fitting of a similar band observed in black drawings from an Copyright © 2015 John Wiley
  • . Representative micro-Raman spectroscopy spectra obtained from specimens 1, 2 and 6 of the black paint used in the chamber H of Barnenez tumulus, Fig. S6 (Supporting Information). A: spectra (a) and (b) suggest the presence of Mn oxides/oxyhydroxides. B: additional components. ac, amorphous
  • of Fe in these specimens is lower than the content of Mn. For all these reasons, the assignment of this band is not conclusive. Another common spectrum from the specimens 1, 2 and 6, Fig. 1A(b), would support the presence of bixbyite[22,24,29] in this black paint. Calcite has been
  • identified in these specimens as well, Fig. 1A(b) and 1B(c). Haematite has also been discovered as another minor component, Fig. 1B(d), and amorphous carbon appears as the most abundant phase in the paint, Fig. 1B(e). Carbon atoms from amorphous carbon and carbonates have also been
RAP03817 (QUIBERON (56). Beg er Vil : un habitat de chasseurs-cueilleurs maritimes de l'Holocène. Rapport de FP 2019)
  • . Après une phase initiale où les activités étaient très éloignées de la zone actuellement fouillée, il y eut une installation avec rejets de coquilles et autres déchets, qui s’est aussi accompagnée de quelques creusements et de l’aménagement d’une aire de combustion de grandes
  • cette période (Marchand, 2013). L’habitat de plein-air de Bordelann est installé à proximité d’une source, en tête d’un vallon de la « côte sauvage » de cette île escarpée. Les milliers de silex taillés qui y furent recueillis en prospections pédestres et en sondages manuels
RAP03316.pdf (PLOUHINEC (29). Ménez-Dregan 1 : des Prénéandertaliens aux Néandertaliens à l'extrême ouest de l'Europe. Rapport de FP)
  • , avec une organisation de l’espace autour de structures de combustion, des aires réservées à la taille, des aires de rejet le long des parois et des aménagements probables de sols sous forme de litières (couche 5) ; pour la dernière occupation (couche 4b), l’espace sous abri était
Les premier peuplements de l’ouest de la France : dépôts pléistocènes et occupations paléolithiques de la région Bretagne (2018) (Les premier peuplements de l’ouest de la France : dépôts pléistocènes et occupations paléolithiques de la région Bretagne. Rapport de PCR 2018)
  • Bretagne, livrant, dans les aires favorables à la conservation de sédiments anciens, les coupes et gisements paléolithiques qui nous intéressent ici. L’importance scientifique du littoral breton est ainsi de nous offrir des données essentielles à la compréhension des premiers
RAP00129.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport de sondage et de prospection-inventaire.)
  • (?) and occupation (LIA) Early occupation (NEO-EIA) 2a 1 Le Yaudet. Tranchée 1. Phases (early occupation(NEO- EIA) =occupation ancienne (Néo-Premier A . du F.); Quarry(?) and occupation (LIA) = carrière et occupation (Second A . du F.); stone building and its abandonment=bâtiment maçonné et
  • h e Baie de l a V i e r g e , a wide e s t u a r y a t t h e mouth o f t h e r i v e r Leguer. The promontory, r o u g h l y r e c t a n g u l a r i n shape, i s separated from t h e mainland by a deep v a l l e y a l o n g which t h e minor road from Le Yaudet v i l l a g e t
  • h e headland from t h e mainland was u t i l i z e d as p a r t o f t h e d e f e n s i v e system i n t h e pre-Roman p e r i o d by t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a rampart along i t s n o r t h - w e s t e r n edge running from a prominent granite Beaumanoir, a t t h e
  • f t h e a n c i e n t v i l l a g e o f Le Yaudet and t h e r e l i c o f i t s f a r m l a n d , now abandoned. The s i t e was a c q u i r e d by t h e Departement o f Cote du Nord i n 1980, a t t h e r e q u e s t o f t h e Commune, t o p r o t e c t i t from development
  • i s c o v e r i e s made over t h e years have been c o n v e n i e n t l y summarized by L. Pape (1978, ASSASS) t o which may now be added a discussion o f C e l t i c and C a r t h a g i n i a n c o i n s from a n i n e t e e n t h c e n t u r y c o l l e c t i o n thought
  • t o have come from t h e s i t e (Sanquer 1983). Several excavations extensive nature. have taken place b u t none o f an I n 1935 a number o f s k e l e t o n s were d i s c o v e r e d c l o s e t o t h e church (parcelle 29). They were w i t h o u t d a t i n g
  • evidence b u t an e a r l y medieval date seems l i k e l y (Savidan 1935; Mazeres 1936). From 1952 u n t i l 1954 P r o f e s s o r F l e u r i o t examined t h e Roman w a l l a t t h e n o r t h - e a s t corner o f t h e s i t e b o t h west and s o u t h o f t h e Poste de Douane
  • a l (Garlan 1969). Finally, i n 1978, a s m a l l sondage was dug t o examine a c i r c l e , which appeared on an a i r photograph, i n advance o f t h e c r e a t i o n o f a car park. P o t t e r y o f Bronze Age type was r e p o r t e d . It i s c l e a r from
  • the archaeological i n v e s t i g a t i o n s and casual d i s c o v e r i e s and from t h e h i s t o r i c a l r e c o r d (De La B o r d e r i e 1853, 1896; Fleuriot considerable h i s t o r i c a l 1954b) t h a t Le Yaudet i s a site of potential: the promontory has produced
  • landscape l i e s t h e s t r u c t u r e o f t h e settlement and i t s economic hinterland dating t o the f i f t e e n t h and s i x t e e n t h c e n t u r i e s . . _ The p r e s e n t r e s e a r c h The design e x c a v a t i o n s o f 1991 were designed t o answer a l i
  • d e p o s i t s was l i k e l y t o be good, w h i l e Trench 2 was l o c a t e d t o examine t h e s t r a t i g r a p h y i m m e d i a t e l y behind t h e Roman d e f e n s i v e w a l l . results, as w i l l be apparent from t h e d e s c r i p t i o n The t o follow
RAP02769.pdf (ÎLE-DE-MOLÈNE (29). programme archéologique molenais, rapport n°17, beg ar loued : un habitat en pierres s7ches du campaniforme/âge du bronze ancien. rapport de fouille programmée 2011)