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RAP03967 (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil à Quiberon. Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de fouille programmée 2020 )
  • une étude systématique des restes archéologiques exhumés : technique de débitage des outils en bois de cerf (Poissonnier et Kayser, 1988), typologie lithique (Kayser, 1992), production des outillages de pierre (Marchand, 1999), consommation des coquillages (Dupont, 2006), des
  • opérationnelle, qui permet de revisiter la fouille et d’y réaliser des prises de mesure ou des recherches. Flavien 10 Fouille de Beg-er-Vil Lécuyer a soutenu sa thèse à l’INSA, avec un chapitre consacré au montage de ce projet numérique : Flavien LÉCUYER (2020) - Méthodes de production
RAP01557.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport final de synthèse de fouille programmée 1996-1998)
RAP00568.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • /79, H 132, 874, L26, D153) from which 'total' collection had previously been made (fig. 1). Of thèse, A92 had been started in 1986 and remained to finish. The ai rn of thèse smal 1 excavations was the investigation of surf ace/'sub-surf ace rel at i onshi ps; fields were selected
  • is a good indicator of settlement in the near vicinity. In the case of the test pit T37 prehistoric pottery was recovered from the surface, but there were no sub-surface features of that date. It is impossible to suggest reasons for the soning of the prehistoric material on the surface
  • Df the material in it, do not however suggest a midden but rather collapsed walls or some sort of bank. The absence of Roman material from the dump suggests that it was formed before the Roman period: the few Roman sherds found in the topsoil could have been derived from a very
  • material was obtained from T29 (as was reflected by the results D -f the total collection) but more Roman pottery was found. Time ran ont and the sites had to be backfilled at the point, when ditches were recognised (Asti 13. and Davies 1987, 118-21). In 1988 the excavation was resumed
  • the proximity of the Roman buildings. The si des and bottom of the trenches were cleaned manually. Ihe extent of the trenches was limited by the track and modem drainage pipes. T42 was eut from the north-west corner of T28 due west for a 1 distance of 9m; T43 was eut due north from
  • the same corner and was 4.5m long; T44 was eut north from the north-east corner of T28 for 4.4m (fig. 3). In T42 two ditches were located eut into the natural . One (24) was lm wide and about 0.2m deep and was fi lied with a loam (23) similar to the plough soil. The other (39) was much
  • marks the north b oun d ar y of t h e field. None of the trenches produced structural évidence though the plough soil contai ned large blocks of stone which were cl early derived from a building. It is qui te possible that the buildings were located right. on the ridge, and therefore
  • that this ditch was filled (and perhaps eut) at a later date than ditches 5 and 10. Indeed it may have been filled during the 9 destruction o-f the buildings. Comment The fabric and forms of the pottery, similar to the material from HSO (excavated in 1986: Asti 11 and Davies 1987, 120-1
  • ) and A31/79 below, suggest a firstand second-century date for the occupation of the nearby, but still unlocated, structure. The later ditch (11) was filled with structural material from this building. The absence of post-second-century pottery from the excavations and fieldwalking
  • and was destroyed or collap>sed in the second century, with no subséquent occupation of that parti cul ar site. A31/79 (Ru-ffiac ZN 119) A3 1/79 is situated 4 00m north of Petit Madou in Ruffiac; it stretches from the crest of a ridge on the 40m contour down the north-east slope of a small
  • soil varied from 0.15m on the top of the ridge (the south-west end of T40) to 0.4m at the north-east, down-slope, end. The plough soil (57, 78) overlay the natural clay subsoil (79), into which features had been eut. The shallowness of the plough soil and regular ploughing probably
  • o O o o ,0 , o sherds 0 Fig.S 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100m OO OOO o interesting assemblage (10) of tile and building stone, which suggested that material démoli shed from a substantiel building had been dumped in the ditch. The tile included fragments of floor tile
  • and reached a maximum depth of 0.35m: this point corresponded with the break in slope. No finds were recovered from layer 4. The only other feature located in T39 was 18m from the north end of the trench and was a shal 1 ow-si ded 'ditch' 0.15m deep (5). It had an irregular profile
  • ditches. In T39 ditch 3 contained a large quantity of brick, tile and stone which appears to be the residue from a démoli shed building; when this ditch was further investigated in T46 there was, however, little démolition material; this implies that the buildings were located
  • was probably used for agricultural purposes in the Roman period and hence that the distribution of Roman pottery on the surface derived from manuring. However, the concentrations of brick and tile found in 'total' collection cannot be expiai ned in this way, since the material occurs
  • quantities of tile in most of the ditches therefore suggests that tile was dumped on A31/79 after the f i el ds/encl osures (and associated buildings from which the material may have been derived) had gone ont of use. The amounts of brick and tile were not, however, very great
  • material collected from this field originally suggested thaï i t was a likely site to find évidence of continuity from Roman into later periods, with its distribution of Roman, médiéval and post-medi eval pottery and brick and tile too, as wel 1 as earthworks. It is therefore very
  • of pasture north of H132, in order to investigate the farmer's report of large blocks of stone coming from the area. It had eighteenth- and ni netee^nth-centur y pottery in the ploughsoil, but neither structures nor features were revealed. The square was excavated in the same way as B409
  • thick (4, 10, 23). A dump (12), largely of roofing material, was laid over some of this in the north-western corner of T38. Above thèse layers was the modem plough soil (3, 8), but some of the large blocks of walling may have protruded to cause plough damage, and were subsequently
  • ) was also recovered . The majority of this pottery was recovered from the plough soil (1116 sherds, 6.5kg, representing a minimum of 52 vessels) and from the destruction levels north of wall 7/51 (contexts 4, 10, 12 and 23 - 974 sherds, 8.2kg, minimum 59 vessels). The destruction levels
RAP03345.pdf (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil : Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de FP)
  • lithique (Kayser, 1992), production des outillages de pierre (Marchand, 1999), consommation des coquillages (Dupont, 2006), des crabes (Dupont et Gruet, 2005), de la faune mammalienne (Tresset, 2000 ; Schulting et al., 2004), des poissons (Desse-Berset in Dupont et al., 2009) et des
RAP00565.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • in the Coet Morel /Hôtel Orl and area (Carentoir). Surface material is markedly absent from fields on the northern and southern boundaries of L, on the east/west ridges (particularly on a band north west of Carentoir) and - as might be expected - on most steep slopes. There are again
  • was recorded, the field being the same size and shape as at présent but divided into bandes; an area of 1 ande lay to the north and the nearest settlement (La Boulardaie) lay 130m away. Pottery, building material and schi ste were collected from an area of 1 hectare, distributed ail over
  • for walking. The season was therefore especially productive. Fieldwalking in Runs at 50m intervais (Transect Walking) Fieldwalking over large areas was organised within transects running south/north across the communes. L (in Ruffiac), the only transect not yet walked, was completed
  • covered, encompassing 772 hectares (4.01% of the surface area of the four communes). 30.99kg of pottery and 93.92kg of man-made building material were recovered from the transects; 45% of the pottery was médiéval, 53.6% post-medieval and 1.4% Roman. No pre-Roman pottery was found
  • cadastre, as usual. More than three-quarters of the concentrations (80.2%) lay more than 100m away from early nineteenth-century settlements and only 7.5% lay within 50m of them. (This is not signif icantly différent from distances from modem settlements). Surface material tends
  • , concentrations of surface material were most frequently found in the basin to the south of Ruffiac village (the centre of L) and in the nei ghbourhood of Trignac, in the north of Carentoir commune (F); however, sites were common throughout the southern halves of F and C, particularly
  • or schi ste; the imported material is notably absent from fields cleared of woodl and since the 1 ate nineteenth century. Fieldwalking in 5m squares ('Total' Coll ecti on ) In order to investigate the nature of sites identified in transect walking, as in 1983 and 1984 some fields
  • , and rather more variation than did the other fields, with some tendency for lower readings in the area of the brick/tile/Roman cl ustering. A pl atf orm at the north-western edge of the field produced little material of any type; it is likely that this area has been ploughed down
  • of the 18 mètre squares) was dug. Soil samples for micromorphol ogical and pollen analysis were taken in columns from the sections, using purpose-made meta! containers. Small test holes were also eut by machine at every 15m to the north of Trench 1 (up the side of the south-facing valley
  • practice. Since the two trenches showed différent amounts of soil buildup and material in the two areas, changes in manuring practice rather than lapse in cultivation may be more relevant in explaining the data from Trench 1. The land-use around Trench 2 clearly changed when
  • no, or next to no, material. As in 1984, even fields with inhabited structures in the early nineteenth century produced no more material than that sufficient to qualify as a 'possible site' (F212); and, as noted above, most of the high concentrations occurred more than 100m from présent
  • and early twentieth centuries. Given that vacated buildings are often left to di sintegrate , collapsed buildings are likely to leave a surface scatter of schi ste; where this is distinguishable from natural, the distinction ought I \ to be noted since the material may be just
  • as significant as surface brick and tile. We have made some progress in characterising the local schi stes - which are of very mixed character and considérable local variation - by identifying small quarries within the study area and comparing samples with material from buildings and from
  • surface collections (principally during May 1985). This is sufficient to make it clear that a proportion of the commonly occurring surface material on our fields is imported - from good quai ity modem si ate to harder schi stes, both used largely for roofing but also within the mud si
  • . The présence of this material on the fields therefore indicates imports into the study area for building purposes. It is so common on the surface of présent arable that it is reasonable to explain most of it as the product of manuring activities; it only does not occur notably on recently
  • collection; phosphate analysis and soil magnetic susceptibil ity survey of the four selected areas; and excavation of part of a bank and lynchet near a field from which 'total' collection had previously been made. Three days (21-23 March) were spent in préparation by three people
  • ; the main team (consisting largely of past and présent students from the Universities of London and Reading) numbered twenty-two, including the directors; it worked for twel ve days, from 24 March, and had one day off; nine people (including one director) remained for an additional week
  • and two adjacent transects in Carentoir (F and C), which had been inadequately covered in 1983 because of the height of the crop, were rewalked; F included the cadastral and modem village of Carentoir (see fig. 1). Except for a small area in the north of C, and for fields previously
  • , but sixteen worked flints were recovered, three from transect L, three from C and ten from F, and also a stone axe, the stone of which has yet to be identified (F117). Two possible areas of ridge and furrow were noted, along with fourteen lynchets and eight (mostly substantial) old banks
  • . As in previous years there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered material, and the same conventions are hereby used to distinguish between them: fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five
RAP01768.pdf (le mésolithique en Bretagne. rapport de projet collectif de recherches)
  • l'Université de Rennes, qui prend en compte tant l'organisation dans l'espace de la production autour des « sites-carrières » qu'une réflexion technologique sur les potentialités de cette roche. Pour ce faire, le phtanite taillable peut se classer en type de Kerannou et type de Kerinet, ce
  • ébauches de bracelets. Cette observation ouvre bien évidemment le débat sur cette production particulière à destination des économies néolithiques : mélange ou beau coup scientifique ?! Peggy Portier évoque le mémoire de maîtrise qu'elle réalise à l'Université de Paris X, concernant les
RAP00566.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • and also zones that tend to produce more or less of a surface scatter» Surface material is usually markedly absent from areas near the commune boundaries and is also difficult to find in the fields to the north of Qui 1 vain and around Le? Bois Faux; si gni f i cant 1 y , the more
  • Bonneraye/Le Printemps/Saint-Nicolas (Reminiac) area and in the area around ^the château of Touraille, stretching north from it over the? Campeneac commune boundary to La Tieulais; and there are a di sti net i ve number of 1 ow concentrations of post-medi eval material in the Les PI aci
  • of Transect G, from Métairie au Joly to Le Nouai-)» The figures quoted above demonstrate the remarkably high proportion of fields in G with large concentrations of surface material. The présence of tile scatters, sometimes with smal 1 quanti ties of Roman material associated, were notable
  • possible to see zoning in the présence of thèse schi stes» hence, only black schi stes occurred throughout the ^Ruffiac basin (from Lodineu to Ville Robert and south to La Rivière) and also in a large zone in the north of Transects D and E (from Trelo to La Touche du Mur); in strong
  • contrast black and pink/purple roofing fragments occurred together in zones immediately north of the Ruffiac basin and west of the Trelo zone. It was also possible, in some cases, to distinguish a range of other schi stes that were imported from nearby local sources, probably as walling
  • , transects within the core. Ail available fields Transect for we>re covered; tl 11s ran 10km slightly west of N of from the north-west Ruffiac, and passed north , boundary communes of Carc , Reminiac and Augan the and into the through south oi Zampefrieac, running just to the w est
  • were walked (of which to be covered (see fig. B) » hectares (18% of the surface area 6 were in M), encompassing 257 of Transect N) . 7.86kg of pottery and 13.81kg of man-made building material were recovered from thèse transects; 1.37. of the pottery was pre-Roman „ 1% Roman, 29.7
  • management the proportion of sites located and quanti ti es of material collected is entirely comparable with those in the four core communes. However , there is less médiéval material than has usual 1 y been found there and it was a considérable contrast to collect pre-Roman sherds from
  • the surface. However, the distribution pattern of material does not si gni f i cant 1 y deviate from that found in the core. There are again areas with little or no material 'blank ' zones - and areas with more or less of a surface scatter. So, material tends to concentrate in the La
  • eux to Ville Glâird area. There are large 'blank' zones from La Ravraie to Le Boulay and also north west of Augan, although such zones are not so character i st i c of the commune boundaries as they are in the core communes. Se h i stes in gênerai re-f lect the pinker colour
  • . The first (T7) ran north west from T3 across a slight break in si ope, and the other two (T5 and T6) were eut in order to section the platform near T4 (see fig. C) . The-? sections were cleaned and drawn and features in the bottom of the trenches recorded. The two 6m squares were mai ni
  • from the north-west corner of T4 and eut the edge of the earthwork platform at right angles; the other (T6) was 23m long and ran from the south-east corner of T4 to the southern end of the platform. A section of the whole earthwork was thus obt ai ned . The earliest évidence came
  • presurnabl y some kind of hardstanding or floor (9) « The northern extent of the standing was established by augering and was found to peter out some three mètres north of the wall. The eastern extent. of the wall was similarly established and found to end 1 » 2m from T12, with no sign
  • the first trench was placed over one of the 'concentrations' of Iron Age pottery. Initial ly ai 6m square (T15) was excavated as at Al 16, A92 and H145, and then five trenches (1 mètre wide) were eut north-south across the field at 30m intervais using a machine (from west to east. T16/17
  • . The détail* of the pottery excavated, compared with that recovered by field walkinq, is tabula\ted below» The increase of prehi stor i c material with depth would argue that. it was derived from subsoil features of that. daite. Rock fragments, of which 307. were roofing slate and 507
  • produced the greatest amount of prehistoric material from the whole site. The 1 owest fill (45) produced 11 pièces of tile (0.365kg) and 8 sherds of Iron Age pottery (0„120g). Layer 57 overlay 45 and produced no finds. 22 overlay this and contained 60 pièces of daub (0.168kg) , 30
  • fragments of tile (0.632kg) and 38 sherds of Iron Age pottery (0.396kg), some of which are rims (fig. 6, 1-180-3, 5 and 10). This layer also contained several large, f 1 at slabs of Cambrian si Itstone like that obtai natale from a narrow band 1.5km to the north of the field. The final
  • (277.), greywacke (147.) and quartz (107.). The stone may have been used when the pit was used for firing, piled on to the south si de, and then pushed back. No finds were recovered from this feature. Half a mètre to the north a pit containing burnt clay fragments was excavated (18
  • as H80, and indeed H145, as a p r o d u c t. o f m a n u r i n g . The évidence that. has corne from K446 and more certainly H80 would suggest that small surface scatters of prehistoric pottery
  • , they are of a size and shape more typical of Roman sites; this impression requires confirmation after a wider study of comparative material» While T15 and T16 have produced settlement data, it is more difficult to interpret the features in the other trenches» Some (e.g. 56, 48, 64) resuit from
RAP00567.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • on the north-east side of the high land near the Carentoi r /Combl essac boundary and none by the wood in the Lande de Craon, both areas lacking surface pottery too. There was little or no pink material on the western and south-western si des of this high land, and none from Couè'dillan
  • north east to Comblessac, as also north from Comblessac to the Lande de Craon. The pattern of occurrences of the schi stes in thèse transects suggests that the pink schi stes . i.e. material from the Guer quarries, may wel 1 have been the earliest to be used in the roofing industry
  • (from the area of La Sourigaie to La Houssaie), passing through the communes of Missiriac and Malestroit and the northern outskirts of the town of Malestroit; Transect R ran north east for 7.75km from Trelo to Le Mur at the north-east corner of Carentoir, passing through the communes
  • of pottery, 161.72kg of man-made building material, 23 from thèse flints and 611.72g of haematite were recovered transects , together with two worked pièces of quartz (from M). This breaks down, by transect, as follows: Brick/tile kg 18. 49 P M 121 . 77 21 . 46 R Pre-Rom. Pottery 1 . 47
  • of surface scatters Di scussi on Clearly the character of the surface material differs from transect to transect. Transects P and M had areas which produced a little pre-Roman pottery - as had Transect N - a phenomenon that is extremely rare in the core communes (Asti 11 and Davies 1986
  • for its very 1 ow proportions of médiéval pottery and very high of post-medi eval . Thèse results are striking by comparison with patterns of material recovered from the four core communes. Whereas the amounts of Roman material collected from the surface are mue h the same, the amounts
  • and proportions of médiéval material are 1 ower (especially in R) - as in N - while those of post-medi eval material are considerably higher, though not as high as in N; in the core 507. of pottery collected from the surface was médiéval and 46.77. post-medi eval . The proportion
  • . Thereafter, although there are a few 'blank' fields in the nei ghbourhood of Pipriac it is again marked that there are very few from Pipriac east to the Vilaine. The contrast between this area and that to the west of it is very striking. The distribution of material in relation
  • to existing settlements was much the same as found in the core communes, with slightly fewer concentrations at distances above 300m from modem dwellings. In ail cases material tends to occur within 50 and 300m of settlements - in P, for example, 33.37. of concentrations lie within 100
  • used locally for building, especially roofing, materials was also recorded for each field (though not collected). Thèse materials were not carried for long distances (10—20km maximum) but can usually be clearly di st i ngui shed from local natural , and o-f ten have nail holes
  • there are finds from the Rance/ Vi 1 ai ne river Systems and one sherd from Pipriac is already known (Galliou 1977: 91-2). The médiéval fabrics from this eastern région seem to have less mica, fewer spi cul es and more grog. Some of the fields with Roman material are of particular interest
  • was found near Le Boschet, Château de la Boulaye, 'Château Gaillard' (ail in M) and near le Mur (R) . There are, however, two cases of such material being found near (apparently) non-seigneurial settlements 300m from Comblessac in R and 100m from La Rigaudiere, 1km south of Pipriac, in M
  • then - between October and January 19B7 - undertook the index ing and organisation of this material, together with basic analysis of démographie data she had previously collected. Ail data from the survey of standing buildings has been put on dise, ready for analysis in the coming year
  • years, took place from 20 March - 4 April in the communes surrounding Ruffiac, Treal , St-Ni col as-du-Tertre and Carentoir, in the departments of Morbihan and 1 1 1 e-et-Vi 1 ai ne in eastern Brittany. The aim of the study is to détermine when, how and why the exploitation
  • landscape
  • , Reading, Cardiff and York) numbered twenty-two, ' including the directors, and worked for twel ve deiys, from 22 March, with one day off. Six people went in advance, and worked for one day beforehand. Overall, 330 mandays were spent on this year ' s season, including travelling time
  • ) Sampling was organized in three 2km transects radiating from the core (P, M and R) and thèse were wal ked in the same way as Transects A to L within the core and Transect N outside it, in 1982-6. Transect P ran due west to the River Oust for 4.1km from the western boundary of Ruffiac
  • . 0. 767. 1 . 37. Table 1: Roman Medi eval Post -med . Wei ght Fl int Haemati te by no. kg Pot Pot Pot g 2. 72 1 3. 67 34 . 67. 61 . 17. 2. 97. 545 18 26. 01 347. 61. 57. 3 . 87. 64 4 86. 87. 3. 13 3.77. 8.27. proportions and quantities of material recorded As in the core
  • of building material) have been termed 'sites'; fields in which one unit produced five or more sherds or fragments of building material, and two or more neighbouring units produced one to four, or. two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds or fragments, have been termed
  • 'probable sites'; fields in which there were irregular concentrations of material not covered by the above catégories - for example, one unit with five or more sherds of the same period - have been termed 'possible sites'. (It should be stressed, yet again, that the terme are conventions
RAP03240.pdf (PLOUEZOC'H (29). Grand cairn de Barnenez : nouvelles approches, nouveaux résultats, nouvelles perspectives. Rapport de FP 2015)
  • Barnenez’s term is associated to the cairn, excavated and restored during the 50-60’s by PierreRoland Giot. It seems isolated now but other adjacent buildings are known and specially a second long tumulus next to the cairn at its north. This work wants to bring to light this monuments
  • with an updating of its data which can help to the understanding of the Barnenez group. Key words: Megalith, North-west France, long tumulus, landscape (1) Université de Rennes 1 .UMR 6566-Creaah. florian.cousseau@gmail.com ARPI. Arqueología y Prehistoria del Interior peninsular 03– 2015
  • royale belge d’Anthropologie et de Préhistoire: 259276. Laporte L. 2010a: Innate and/or expressed identities: Their conceptualization through monumentality, funerary practices and grave goods? Some examples from the megalithic tradition of western France., Journal of Neolithic
RAP03449 ((56). Autour du Golfe du Morbihan, les landes de Lanvaux et le sud de la vallée de la Vilaine. Rapport de PD 2016)
  • , Arradon…) mais les cultures n’étaient pas favorables au contrôle de terrain. La production métallurgique en basse vallée de la Vilaine La prospection a abouti cette année à la découverte de deux nouveaux ferriers sur la commune de Férel, lieux-dits le Gastre et la Métairie Neuve. Ces
  • restreint d’une dizaine de kilomètres de long, ils forment très probablement une zone de production métallurgique, comme celle reconnue dans le centre Morbihan (communes de Bignan, la Chapelle-Neuve, Guénin, Moréac, Plumelin, Remungol). Les fragments de tuiles recueillis sur plusieurs
  • Coet Sürho: alluvial soils overlying granite and gneiss Pen Castel: rendzinas overlying granite Recent discovery of mediaeval ceramic and building debris at Coet Sürho (Muzillac) suggests the locations of 2 potential medieval settlements dating th th from the 13 -15 century. Survey
  • of upstanding structural remains including large rectilinear ramparts of probable Iron Age origin, several rough stone buildings and walls from the Mediaeval period. These remains encompass an area c.1ha in size. Recent discovery of Gallo-Romain and medieval pottery indicate
  • Castel, échelle 1/1250 2 2.1 ACCÈS, CONDITIONS AU SOL ET CONSIDÉRATIONS GÉNÉRALES Survey in M1-4 at Coet Sürho extended through mainly accessible arable and pasture sloping gently to the N/NE. Complete survey coverage in M3 was made impossible due to obstruction from numerous
  • small-scale ferrous responses are evident throughout the results from both survey at Coet Sürho (M1-4) and Pen Castel. These mostly represent modern ferrous debris contained within the topsoil and are not discussed in the results section of the report unless deemed relevant. Large
  • concentrations of ferrous response at Coet Sürho in locations M3-4 derive from survey in proximity to existing boundaries and farm buildings. Broad regions of ferrous response from survey in proximity to existing boundaries are also evident in the Pen Castel survey results. One substantial
  • /negative responses from natural soil/geological variation also extend throughout the survey results from Pen Castel. The range of this variation has significantly complicated interpretation of the Pen Castel survey results. Client CERAM Coet Sürho (Muzillac) et Pen Castel (Arzon
  • remains uncertain. 3.1.5 3.1.6 3.1.7 M2 No responses of definite archaeological character have been recorded from survey in M2. Poorly defined negatives 11 to the N likely represent variations in soil morphology/geology. M3 No responses of definite archaeological character
  • are evident in the results from M3. Responses of possible interest are indicated, mainly in the central and western region of survey (12 & 13). The archaeological significance of these anomalies is uncertain. Insufficient survey area available in M3 and an abundance of modern ferrous
  • responses has made interpretation of the results from M3 uncertain. M4 No responses of definite archaeological character are evident in the results from M4. Potentially signficant responses are indicated to the NW (14), NE (15) and S/SW (16). Response group 15 to the E may represent
  • The southern corner of a suspected Mediaeval building foundation (17) is evident to the N in the results from survey at Pen Castel. Potential further building footprints may be present to the NE (18 & 19), although these represent weak linear/sub-angular patterns which are barely visible
  • of anomaly 17 and W of 23 likely derive from natural soil/geological variation. Further potentially significant responses include a linear arrangement of anomalies (20) running almost parallel with the upstanding Iron Age ramparts enclosing the site; several weak linear © Target Client
  • © Target Interpretation of the results from survey at Pen Castel is highly tentative. The potential that many of the anomalies highlighted from survey in this location derive from soil/geological variation should not be dismissed. Client CERAM Coet Sürho (Muzillac) et Pen Castel
  • locations M2-M3 at Coet Sürho display no responses of obvious archaeological character. Interpretation of the results from M3 has been particularly hampered due to numerous trees which prevented complete survey coverage. 4.3 Interpretation of the results from survey at Pen Castel
  • remains somewhat speculative. Excluding the building foundation (17) highlighted to the north most of the anomalies in the Pen Castel results are poorly defined and masked by soil/geological variations. Groups of anomalies highlighted as potentially significant include potential
  • , No. 1. GRASS Development Team, 2012, Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (GRASS) Software, Version 6.4.2. Open Source Geospatial Foundation. QGIS Development Team, 2014. QGIS Geographic Information System. Open Source Geospatial Foundation Project. http://qgis.osgeo.org
RAP03817 (QUIBERON (56). Beg er Vil : un habitat de chasseurs-cueilleurs maritimes de l'Holocène. Rapport de FP 2019)
  • permet de mettre en évidence à une échelle locale, la variété des méthodes et des objectifs de production du travail des matières osseuses au Mésolithique, reconnu par ailleurs, associant un outillage osseux léger (majoritairement des poinçons), support occasionnel d’un art
  • archéologiques exhumés : technique de débitage des outils en bois de cerf (Poissonnier et Kayser, 1988), typologie lithique (Kayser, 1992), production des outillages de pierre (Marchand, 1999), consommation des coquillages (Dupont, 2006), des crabes (Dupont et Gruet, 2005), de la faune
RAP03801 (Corpus des signes gravés néolithiques, Art rupestre néolithique en Armorique. Rapport PCR.)
  • lasergrammétrique et/ou photogrammétrique terrestre de l’architecture (densité sub-millimétrique) et des abords (densité centimétrique), ensuite le traitement des données (reconstruction et consolidation des maillages), enfin la production géométrale et la qualification des structures
RAP03187.pdf (QUIBERON (56). Beg er Vil : un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de FP 2015)
  • débitage des outils en bois de cerf (Poissonnier et Kayser, 1988), typologie lithique (Kayser, 1992), production des outillages de pierre (Marchand, 1999), consommation des coquillages (Dupont, 2006), des crabes (Dupont et Gruet, 2005), de la faune mammalienne (Tresset, 2000 ; 13
  • occidentale » dirigé par Grégor Marchand. • « Coastal transitions: A comparative approach to the processes of neolithization in Atlantic Europe » dirigé par Pablo Arias Cabal Il nous a donc semblé essentiel de faire dater de nouveaux matériaux et plus particulièrement des échantillons à
  • (Quiberon, Morbihan) Figure 1.5 - Exemples des armatures lithiques de Beg-er-Vil (dessin G. Marchand, 1999). Pour le reste de la production, Les traits techniques qu’il convient de retenir sont : - la standardisation des lamelles (rythme préférentiel), moins perceptible pour les lames
RAP03364.pdf (PLOUGASTEL-DAOULAS (29). Le Rocher de l'Impératrice. Rapport de FP 2014-2016)
  • regular blades, setting up of meticulous production methods, use of non-local raw material, few evidences of “en éperon” preparations), but also testify of a clear progression to the Azilian (systematic use of soft hammerstone, disappearance of bladelets productions, and corollary
  • the nature and rhythm of the techno-economic transformation marking this poorly understand transitional period between Magdalenian and Azilian. Lithic production shows high qualitative standards and exhibits some characteristic clearly inherited from the Magdalenian (production of long
  • . OBJECTIFS DE PRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 78 16.4. DES CHAÎNES OPÉRATOIRES FRAGMENTÉES QUI FLOUTENT ENCORE LA CARACTÉRISATION DES MÉTHODES DE PRODUCTION
  • PROCESSUS D’AZILIANISATION DANS LA PRODUCTION GRAPHIQUE : LA CONTRIBUTION MAJEURE DU ROCHER DE L’IMPÉRATRICE (C. BOURDIER ET N. NAUDINOT) .................................................................... 122 19.5. ÉTUDE TRACÉOLOGIQUE DES PLAQUETTES GRAVÉES (L. BARON ET S. BEYRIES
  • d’incursions ponctuelles (saisonnières ?) de groupes tardiglaciaires sur le Massif armoricain, après un probable abandon de la région au cours du GS-2. L’industrie lithique montre des objectifs de production résolument laminaires. Cet assemblage s’avère particulièrement heuristique afin
  • d’enquêter sur la nature et les rythmes des transformations techno-économiques qui marquent cette période charnière si mal connue du Paléolithique entre Magdalénien et Azilien. La production lithique est ainsi soignée et présente des caractéristiques clairement héritées du Magdalénien
  • Magdalénien et sembleraient annoncer les productions graphiques de l’Azilien récent. Si la plupart s’illustrent par des formes géométriques, plusieurs éléments figuratifs, dont certains très naturalistes (aurochs, chevaux), ont été mis en évidence. Les différentes études menées sur ces
  • (probably dedicated to the production of the numerous projectile points found in the assemblage). These cores have probably been taken of the site. If it is too early to be conclusive on this point, like the others few available testimonies for this period in the region, this site would
  • testify of Lateglacial groups limited incursions (seasonal?) into the Armorican Massif after a probable desertion of the region during the GS-2. Lithic production clearly aims the production of blades. This assemblage is particularly interesting in the perspective of studying
  • of the Final Magdalenian. However, they seem to announced the particular symbolic productions of the Late Azilian. If most of the tablets exhibits geometric engravings, several figurative drawings, including naturalistic ones (aurochs and horses), have been discovered. Like the lithic
  • assemblage, these artistic productions appear to be caught between the Magdalenian and the Azilian. Various studies allowed: starting proposing hypothesis about technical gestures used to produce these engravings; identify colorants; or identify a probable arrhythmia between technical
RAP03333.pdf ((22)(29)(35)(56). Corpus des signes gravés néolithiques. Rapport de PCR)
  • des abords (densité centimétrique), ensuite le traitement des données (reconstruction et consolidation des maillages), enfin la production géométrale et la qualification des structures. Soulignons qu’en juillet 2016, le LARA a fait l’acquisition de 2 scanners à main Creaform (le