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RAP03967 (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil à Quiberon. Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de fouille programmée 2020 )
  • « SMS Shell-Middens Seasonality »). Les analyses d’eau vont être réalisées début 2021 pour permettre l’interprétation des résultats sur coquilles archéologiques et modernes. Les données issues du terrain sont impliquées dans la réalisation de quatre thèses de troisième cycle. Diana
RAP03364.pdf (PLOUGASTEL-DAOULAS (29). Le Rocher de l'Impératrice. Rapport de FP 2014-2016)
  • the nature and rhythm of the techno-economic transformation marking this poorly understand transitional period between Magdalenian and Azilian. Lithic production shows high qualitative standards and exhibits some characteristic clearly inherited from the Magdalenian (production of long
  • of the Final Magdalenian. However, they seem to announced the particular symbolic productions of the Late Azilian. If most of the tablets exhibits geometric engravings, several figurative drawings, including naturalistic ones (aurochs and horses), have been discovered. Like the lithic
  • -BORÉAL ET SUB-ATLANTIQUE – US-108 .......................................................................................... 53 11.4.6. PÉRIODE MODERNE – US-101 .............................................................................................................. 53 3
  • knowledge of these groups is however unequaled: if the Late Azilian and the Pleistocene/Holocene transition communities are now well known after some recent works, this is not the case of the Magdalenian and first Azilian societies. The launching of a research program in 2013 in a small
  • occupied during the Early Azilian. The obtaining of radiocarbon dates (the first ones for the Lateglacial of Brittany) places the Azilian occupations between 13000 and 12000 cal. BC, that is to say during the GIS-1e (Bølling). Several evidences suggest this site to be the result
  • testify of Lateglacial groups limited incursions (seasonal?) into the Armorican Massif after a probable desertion of the region during the GS-2. Lithic production clearly aims the production of blades. This assemblage is particularly interesting in the perspective of studying
  • assemblage, these artistic productions appear to be caught between the Magdalenian and the Azilian. Various studies allowed: starting proposing hypothesis about technical gestures used to produce these engravings; identify colorants; or identify a probable arrhythmia between technical
  • , Charlotte Pruvost, Gabrielle Génieux et Julie Bachellerie pour leur implication dans les travaux de terrain et de post-fouille. À Gourguen Davtian pour son aide dans la prise en main d’ArcGis. Yves Le Boulh d’Optirep Topo à Landerneau pour sa disponibilité, sa gentillesse et son aide
RAP01768.pdf (le mésolithique en Bretagne. rapport de projet collectif de recherches)
  • la définition des technologies lithiques au Mésolithique. LA PRESQU'ÎLE A BRENNILIS Le site mésolithique de la Presqu'île a été découvert en 1989, lors de la baisse artificielle des eaux du réservoir de Brennilis liée aux travaux de nettoyage du barrage. Une planigraphie avait
RAP03345.pdf (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil : Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de FP)
RAP03316.pdf (PLOUHINEC (29). Ménez-Dregan 1 : des Prénéandertaliens aux Néandertaliens à l'extrême ouest de l'Europe. Rapport de FP)
  • @hotmail.fr AUGUSTE Patrick paléontologie Laboratoire Préhistoire et Quaternaire, UPRESA 8018, UFR DE GEOGRAPHIE, Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 VILLENEUVE D’ASCQ. Tél: 33 (0)3 20 33 62 78 ; fax: 33 (0)3 20 43 66 77 E-Mail : patrick.auguste@univ-lille1.fr AOUSTIN
RAP03284.pdf (éléments pour une nouvelle approche de l'âge du Bronze en Bretagne ; le cadre chronologique et les formes de l'habitat. Rapport de PCR 2015)
  • 56 56 56 QUESTEMBERT SAINT-AUBIN-DES-LANDES 35 NOYAL-PONTIVY PLEUMELEUC 35 56 PACE 35 56 PACE 35 GUIDEL PACE 35 56 MONTAUBAN-DE-BRETAGNE 35 CLEGUER LA MEZIERE 35 GUIDEL GUIGNEN 35 56 Le Champ Blanc GUICHEN 35 56 Carrière des lacs GUICHEN Habitat
RAP00565.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • or shortly after the château was built. It is therefore hoped that further investigation of Allô will clarify the relationship between settlement and surrounding earthworks. To date, nothing suggests that this area was intensively cultivated before the Roman period, but the weight
  • EAST BRITTANY SURVEY: QUST-VILAINE UATERSHED REPORT ON FIELDWORK IN MARCH-APRIL 1985 The fourth season in a programme of fieldwork, itself part of a larger, multi-discipl inary study of the rel ati onshi p between land-use and seulement during the last two thousand years, took
  • place between 21 March and 13 April in the communes of Ruffiac, Tréal , St-Nicol as-du-Tertre and Carentoir in the Morbihan in eastern Brittany. The aim of the study is to détermine when, how and why the exploitation of the environment changed direction within the historic period
  • , and one spent three days taking soil samples for analysis at the Institut National Agronomique Pari s-Grignon . The weather varied between bad and appalling for much of the three weeks, with plenty of rainfall , but the crop was not high and fields were often in idéal condition
  • . As in previous years there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered material, and the same conventions are hereby used to distinguish between them: fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five
  • for distinguishing between greater and lesser concentrations and for providing a means of référence to them; they do not necessarily dénote the position of former settlements. ) In accordance with the conventions, 187) may be classified as follows: the concentrations (total 'Sites' 'Probable
  • acing slopes. Upland concentrations were less notable than in 1984 (transects H, J, K) with only a quarter lying between the 50m and 75m contours; more than half 1 ay between 25m and 50m (59.9%), as in the other Carentoir transects. Only 35.3% of sites 1 ay within 250m of streams
  • /grey and red/yellow) and three sizes (1.5cm) in an attempt to find criteria for distinguishing between local and imported material. A107 lies just below a flat, exposed hilltop on a south-facing slope 75-80m high. The area was arable when the cadastral survey
  • similar to médiéval and modem pottery and could have been introduced on to the surface. The small quantities of archaeol ogical material recovered, and its gênerai distribution, suggest that it was brought on to the field in the course of manuring; quantities, pattern of distribution
  • . The results confirm the impression that this 1 and was not brought into cultivation until the twentieth century, and confirm the classification made on the basis of transect walking - the field real ly is 1 bl ank 1 . B347 lies on a slight east-facing slope at 35m, beside a stream, and its
  • , at least during the médiéval period (Astill and Davies 1984a: 20). A116 lies to the north of Ruffiac, between Coetion and Le Vivier. It is located in a small damp valley bottom, on a north-facing si ope, at 70m. At least one platform can be seen. To the north of the field, in the lowest
  • lynchet some 1.8m high. This area is near the northern periphery of the Ruffiac commune, and the ancien cadastre indicates that it was a zone of extensive 1 ande in the early nineteenth century. Set within the 1 ande was the petit château of Coetion, with its metai ries (associated
  • of the lynchet (1.8m), indicating notable col 1 uvi ation . The schi ste recovered from the lynchet was not derived from the yellowish-red type which constituted the natural bedrock in the trench. Most was of a grey/green colour. The greatest amounts were recovered at depths of between 5
  • the archaeol ogical potential of small -scale work on field boundaries in this area. The ditch in Trench 1 is likely to be an earlier field boundary, perhaps marking the division between cultivable 1 and and the wet areas of the valley bottom. In Trench 2 the bank may have marked
  • the boundary between plough land and meadow and could also have acted as a kind of flood barrier; the shallowness of the loam deposit would argue for a shorter period of ploughing in the lower northern slope of the valley (the area immediately behind this bank). The absence of brick
  • of évidence suggests intensive cultivation in the late middle âges that was limited in the early modem period with changes in the social status of the 1 andowner and in his method of 1 and management. 8 Envi ronmental , Pottery, Architectural and Language Work, 1984-85 In the course
  • from the fields of the study area, and to pursue the problem of surface scatter arising from middens, it was decided to investigate phosphate and magnetic susceptibil ity readings from this known settlement with its known pattern of rubbish disposai. In December 1984 soil samples
  • of the building, especially inside and immediately outside its walls, there were higher levels of 26-37 Si/kg and 200-300ppm. The experiment suggests that we might expect structures and middens in the study area to produce relatively high levels. Pottery from the 1984 season has been sorted
  • with that generated by survey undertaken around St Malo by the Centre Régional Archéologique d'Alet. Similarities in some of the médiéval fabrics were noted, and there was a striking visual similarity between fabric 10 and pottery from a kiln found at Guipel ( 1 1 1 e et Vilaine). The kiln
  • quantities of surface material are no sure guide to the ci rcumstances of its déposition: distribution over the field is as significant as quantity and fields - and even gardens - beside long-establ ished inhabited settlements do not necessarily produce the greatest quantities of material
RAP03185.pdf ((22)(29)(35)(56). Les premiers peuplements de l'ouest de la France : dépôts pléistocènes et occupations paléolithiques de la région Bretagne. Rapport de PCR)
  • , Quaternary International, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2015.07.066. RAVON A.-L., GAILLARD C., MONNIER J.-L., 2015 - Menez-Dregan (Plouhinec, Far Western Europe): the lithic industry from layer 7 and its Acheulian components, Quaternary International, sous presse. 5.2
  • – Communications 11/02/2015 : RAVON A.-L., “The Lower Palaeolithic in Brittany : between Acheulean and Colombanian”, Lithic Studies Society, Franks House, Département de Préhistoire du British Museum. 18/02/2015 : RAVON A.-L., “The Lower Palaeolithic in Brittany : between Acheulean
  • , France) au cours des trois derniers cycles interglaciaire/glaciaire et occupations paléolithiques associées. In : Daire M.-Y., Dupont C., Baudry A., Billard C., Large J.-M., Lespez L., Normand E. Scarre C. (dir.), 2013. Ancient Maritime Communities and the Relationship between People
  • systèmes techniques au Paléolithique ancien : quelle actualité ?, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre la Défense, Paris, 0810/10/14, pp. 47-51. RAVON A.-L., MONNIER J.-L., LAFORGE M., 2015 – Menez-Dregan, layer 4 : a transitional layer between the Lower and Middle Palaeolithic in Brittany
  • ., GIBBARD P.L., MacPHAIL R.I., OWEN F.J., PARFITT S.A., PREECE R.C., ROBERTS M.B., ROBINSON J.E., WHITTAKER J.E., WILKINSON K.N. (2000) - Late Middle Pleistocene deposits at Norton Farm on the West Sussex coastal plain, southern England. Journal of Quaternary Science, 15 (1), 61-89
RAP03654 (PLOUGASTEL-DAOULAS (29). Le Rocher de l'Impératrice. Rapport intermédiaire 2018 de FP 2017-2019)
  • (rouge : réalisées sur fragments osseux indéterminés). 9.2. État de conservation des niveaux archéologiques Comme beaucoup de sites en abris, le gisement du Rocher de l’Impératrice a connu une histoire complexe aux implications parfois importantes pour la conservation des niveaux
  • occupations aziliennes nous avait poussé à lancer un ambitieux programme de destruction/extraction de ces masses de grès armoricain s’appuyant sur l’idée que ces dalles auraient pu préserver les niveaux tardiglaciaires des creusements modernes. Cette hypothèse a été très couteuse en temps
RAP03190.pdf (PLOUGASTEL-DAOULAS (29). Le rocher de l'Impératrice. Rapport intermédiaire 2015 de FP 2014-2016)
  • transformation marking this poorly understand transitional period between Magdalenian and Azilian. Lithic production shows high qualitative standards and exhibits some characteristic clearly inherited from the Magdalenian (production of long regular blades, setting up of meticulous production
  • to announced the particular symbolic productions of the Late Azilian. If most of the tablets exhibits geometric engravings, several figurative drawings, including naturalistic ones (aurochs and horses), have been discovered. Like the lithic assemblage, these artistic productions appear
  • SÉRIE : IMPLICATIONS SUR LE PROTOCOLE D'ANALYSE ET LES RÉSULTATS .......................................... 62 9.5.2. LES OUTILS IDENTIFIÉS ET LEUR(S) FONCTIONNEMENT(S) .............................................................................. 65 9.5.3. DISCUSSION AUTOUR DES
  • unequaled: if the Late Azilian and the Pleistocene/Holocene transition communities are now well known after some recent works, this is not the case of the Magdalenian and first Azilian societies. The launching of a research program in 2013 in a small rock shelter discovered by M. Le
  • . The obtaining of radiocarbon dates (the first ones for the Lateglacial of Brittany) places the Azilian occupations between 13000 and 12000 cal. BC, that is to say during the GIS-1e (Bølling). Several evidences suggest this site to be the result of a succession of short occupations by small
  • incursions (seasonal?) into the Armorican Massif after a probable desertion of the region during the GS-2. Lithic production clearly aims the production of blades. This assemblage is particularly interesting in the perspective of studying the nature and rhythm of the techno-economic
  • to be caught between the Magdalenian and the Azilian. Various studies allowed: starting proposing hypothesis about technical gestures used to produce these engravings; identify colorants; or identify a probable arrhythmia between technical and symbolic changes during the Azilian. The Rocher
  • accueil et leur intérêt pour notre travail. Eugène Antolinos-Basso, Charlotte Pruvost et Gabrielle Génieux, étudiants de Master 1 de l’Université de Nice pour leur implication dans les travaux de terrain et de post-fouille. Yves Le Boulh d’Optirep Topo à Landerneau pour sa
RAP00567.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • EAST BRITTANY SURVEY 1987 PU EAST BRITTANY SURVEY - OUST/VILAINE WATERSHED EASTER 1987 The seventh season in a programme of fieldwork, itself part of a larger, mul ti -di sci pl i nary study of the relationship between 1 and-use and settlement during the last two thousand
  • . Future work A team of four will return to the core communes in October-November 1987 to do one final month of 'total collection'. In August and September 1988 we plan an extended season of small-scale excavation in the core, to continue to investigate the relationship between surface
  • (see fig. 1). M was in 1986, and six fields walked then: the alignment transect was slightly changed in 1987 to ensure coverage of a cross-section of land-use types Carentoir and the Vilaine. to the started of this adéquate between Sui table fields under plough and with young crop
  • there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered pottery, and the usual conventions are hereby used to distinguish between them: fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five or more fragments
  • for di sti ngui shi ng between greater and lesser concentrations and for providing a means of référence to them; they do not necessarily dénote the location of former settl ements. ) In accordance with the conventions, the concentrations of surface material (total 219) may
  • : 115). P is notable for its relatively high proportion of fields with significant concentrations of surface material, high by comparison both with Transects M and R as also by comparison with the core, where fields with notable concentrations averaged only 24.27. of those walked
  • of material (15.67. 'possible', 177. 'probable' and 4.57. 'site'). Transect M itself produced unusually high quanti ti es of brick and tile, and a high proportion of its concentrations were characterized by brick and tile - some of which had Roman pottery associated. Transect R was notable
  • for its very 1 ow proportions of médiéval pottery and very high of post-medi eval . Thèse results are striking by comparison with patterns of material recovered from the four core communes. Whereas the amounts of Roman material collected from the surface are mue h the same, the amounts
  • two groups of 'blank' fields south east and south west of Comblessac. Together thèse zones suggest that the settlement of Comblessac and its immediately dépendent arable may have been rather small, much smaller than the centres in the core communes: it is notable that a tile
  • scatter with Roman material lies near the bourg of Comblessac and not on some distant periphery, as is more usual . In Transect M there were 'blank' areas on the banks of the River Aff and its tributaries but most notable was a very marked and very large 'blank' zone in the commune
  • of Bruc — for a distance of some 2.5km; thèse 'blank' fields begin already in the eastern part of Sixt commune though do not reach as far as the présent boundary of Pipriac on the east. Everything, including the shape of the fields, suggests that this is an area of late exploitation
  • . Thereafter, although there are a few 'blank' fields in the nei ghbourhood of Pipriac it is again marked that there are very few from Pipriac east to the Vilaine. The contrast between this area and that to the west of it is very striking. The distribution of material in relation
  • the local topography. In ail transects most concentrations lay between 25 and 75m (in P 747., in M 77.57. and in R 93.67.). 4 (In R none lay below 25m.) Most lay within 250m of a mapped stream (44.47. in P, 63.17. in M and 717. in R) though a significant proportion in P lay over 250m
  • where such schi stes do not occur at ail; and that there are distinctions between the occurrence of black and pink 'roofing' schi stes. In ail three transects it is very unusual to find fields with pink but not black schi stes and the rare occurrence of thèse does not look
  • Emailleries. It seems highly likely that most of this transect, beyond its western parts, lay beyond the normal area of distribution of this material, whose source we have recently localized to quarries immediately south west of Guer. In Transect R there were no 'roofing' schi stes
  • in this area and hence the earliest to get scattered on the fields. Notably they do not occur in areas of relatively late arable exploitation, whereas the black materials are pretty ubi qui tous. Thèse patterns are very comparable to those -found in the core communes and wi 1 1 be tested
  • further. This is not the place -For comprehensi ve considération o -F contrasts between the core communes and the transects sampling the surrounding area o-F the Oust/Vilaine watershed. However , it may be useful to make one or two observations about the material, prior to sustained
  • examination o-F it. Preliminary examination of the pottery suggests that there are some distinctions between the fabrics collected between Pipriac and the Vilaine (Transect M, eastern portion) and those characteri sti c both of the core and of sample transects near it (N, P, R
  • and the western section of M). Some of the Roman fabrics in eastern ti had not been noted before, and included a late Roman roi 1 er-st amped sherd of Argonne ware from M447, near 'Château Gaillard', 2.5km east of Pipriac bourg ■ This ware has an essentially coastal distribution, although
  • then - between October and January 19B7 - undertook the index ing and organisation of this material, together with basic analysis of démographie data she had previously collected. Ail data from the survey of standing buildings has been put on dise, ready for analysis in the coming year
RAP01557.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport final de synthèse de fouille programmée 1996-1998)
  • la chronologie: Mésolithique-Néolithique-A. du Bronze- A. du Fer-Galloromain-Haut Moyen Age- Moyen Age-Moderne • sur la nature des vestiges immobiliers : remparts - porte -voie- habitats - fontaine • sur la nature des vestiges mobiliers : poterie - monnaie - objets de bronze, de
  • parasite qui avait envahi cette zone et en avons effectué un relevé topographique complet, où figuraient les pointements granitiques comme les murs de clôture modernes. Afin de mieux comprendre l'organisation des structures, nous avons débarrassé une partie de la pente de sa couche
  • parcelle 20. Le muret de clôture encore visible aujourd'hui (F 515) lui est postérieur, de même que la couche de terre végétale, épaisse de 0,20m, qui s'accumula à l'arrière de cette structure d'époque moderne. Si l'on revient maintenant à l'escarpe du rempart à l'avant du parement
RAP00568.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • of the relationship between land-use and settlement during the 1 ast two thousand years, took place from 25 August - 1 October in the communes of Ruffiac, Tréal , St-Ni col as-du-Tertre and Carentoir, in the department of Morbihan in eastern Brittany. The ai m of the study is to détermine when
  • dug parallel, 6.4m apart. Ditch 19, 1.75m wide and 0.6 m deep, had within its fill (20) two sherd s of late Iron- Age/ear 1 y Roman pottery (Fabric 13) and 6 small pièces of iron— working slag. The more northerly ditch, 2:4, had a primary silt (60) with no finds and then a loam
  • and ditches. A f 1 at-bottomed ditch, 0.5m wide and 0.2m deep (42), was e:;cavated; its fill (41) contained a ri m of a late Iron-Age/earl y Roman fabric (Fabric 13) and 7 sherds of grey coarse wares (Fabrics 57 and 100) with a small quanti t. y of ceramic roof tile (Fabric. 1, 0.81kg
  • tile (Fabric 1, 0.778kg). A large ditch (61), 2m wide and 1.5m deep, was located two mètres farther down the slope. It had a 'U' shaped profile and its primary fill (59) contained a late Iron-Age/Roman rim sherd, a terra-ni qra-type spout of a f lagon and a sherd from what seems
  • ' collection. Late IronAge/early Roman pottery was recovered (maximum 6 sherds per 5m square) and this tended to concentrate in two areas in the field. The much larger quanti ty of médiéval pottery (maximum 22 sherds per square) had a si mi 1 ar distribution, while the post— medi eval
  • . An oval pit (29: 1.15 x 0.6m and 0.08m deep with fill 30) had been eut by a circular pit (17: diameter 0.75m and 0.15m deep) which had a thick deposit of charcoal (14) in its base and then a sandy fill (18). This had in turn been eut by a circular pit (19: 0.6m diameter and 0.1m deep
  • without more extensive investigation. The séquence from T36 is important. The trench was sited on the highest part of the field, near the top of the slope, yet it has a much deeper stratification than T37 lower down the slope. The buried soil 32, with its charcoal, might represent
  • into natural. The edges were not as clearly defined as ditch 5, and the profile was more irregular; a 2m length was excavated, which was 0.6m deep and 1.2m wide. Although it was parallel with 5, its filling (12) was much sandier and the range of finds was différent. Large quanti ties
  • and ear 1 y Roman pottery in its fills, and the virtual absence of roof tile, implies that it had been filled before the buildings went put of use; the pebbly, foreign, nature of the fills shows that thèse were deliberate. This ditch may have been in existence before the structure
  • was built and may have been made redundant by its construction - hence the fills. Although, then, excavation of A92 was very limited, it cl earl y demonstrates that. there was a Roman-period building on or near the ridge, which was occupied in the first and second centuries
  • southerly, 0.S lm wide and 0.4m deep (51: filled with 50), appears to have been reçut, for a smaller ditch (80: fill 81) 0.5m wide and 0.15m deep had removed the eastern side of ditch 51. Neither ditch produced finds. Ditch 53 was wider (1.2m) and deeper (0.5m) and its fill (52) contai
  • ned four' sherds of southern Gaulish Sami an , and one of grey coarse ware (Fabric 37). The most northerly ditch (55) was 0.9m wide and 0.4m deep, and from its fill (54) came three pièces of tile (Fabric 1). In so far as can be seen in a narrow trench, the three ditches appear
  • to have been dug parai lel to one another, but they were not. equi distant (13.8m between 51 and 53; 11.7m between 53 and 55). Trench 39 T39 was lB3m long; it stretched from the ridge to the bottom of the valley slope and sectioned the two earthworks. The depth of the plough soil
  • at the bottom of the valley slope. The part of T39 which was on the ridge produced one shallow feature only, perhaps the base of a pit (65: 0.6m wide, 0.1m deep), whose fill (9) produced no finds. Between the brow of the ridge and upper part of the slope (between 30 and 60m from the south
  • was to check the course of thèse ditches, and both original ditch and reçut were found; however they produced neither pottery nor tile. A f 1 at-bottomed pit (17), 1.4m wide and 0.5m deep , was located close to ditch 3. Its fill (18) contained 3.7kg of tile (Fabric 1) , 7kg of quartz, one
  • sherd of late Iron-Age/earl y Roman pottery (Fabric 15) and one sherd of vessel glasB. This had a light olive-green colour. Further down the slope, within 10m of pit 17, two ditches were located which had a similar character; both had shallow 'U' shaped profiles; and were apparently
  • by plough soi 1 1, context 25 itself being similar to plough soi 1 2. No further ditches or pits were located beyond ditch 24, but 5rn to the north a layer of dark loarn was found i nterposed between the clay subsoil and the lower plough soi 1 (2). This layer (4) extended for about 25m
  • and was différent from the other ditches located on the site; its fill (11) yielded no finds. This may represent another récent attempt at drainage. The trench al so eut through the earthwork which was located at the bottom of the slope; no additional layers were found and it seemed
  • of the plough soi 1 (47, 48) varied -from 0.15m at its south-west end to 0.46m at the bottom of the slope. As with the other trenches, ail -features were eut into the natural clay subsoil (28) and had fills that seemed to be derived -from the pl ough soi 1 . The southern part o-f the trench
  • produced several -features. On the highest part o-f the slope there was an irregular pit (44) appro;: i matel y 1.8m in diameter and 0.1m deep, whose -fill (45) produced 1 sherd o-f late Iron—Age/early Roman pottery (Fabric 12), 1 sherd o-f grey coarse ware (Fabric 57) and some roofing
RAP03676 (LANDEDA (29). La nécropole de Guennoc, architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons. Rapport de PT 2018)
  • LANDEDA (29). La nécropole de Guennoc, architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons. Rapport de PT 2018
  • exploitation de l’île, à un moment où seul un accès par 20 Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) bateau était possible, peut être médiévale, moderne, voire contemporaine. Des éléments céramiques renvoient à toutes
  • Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) Sommaire Volume de texte SOMMAIRE .................................................................................................................. 1 FICHE
  • II.F - Cairn IV .................................................................................................................. 130 1 Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) CHAPITRE III - ETUDE DES
  • CHAPITRE V - BIBLIOGRAPHIE ......................................................................... 189 Volume de planches 2 Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) Fiche signalétique Localisation Région
  • , Bâtiment 25 Labo Archéosciences Avenue du Général Leclerc - CS 74205 35042 Rennes Cedex – France Dates d’intervention Du 1 septembre au 10 octobre 2017 3 Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) Thesaurus 4
  • Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) Intervenants Direction du projet Florian Cousseau, membre associé UMR6566-CReAAH Gestion du projet UMR6566-CReAAH Marie-Yvane Daire, directrice du laboratoire Catherine Louazel
  • littorale, étude céramique et direction adjointe à l’opération de terrain Chloé Martin, chargée de coordination du projet ALERT, UMR6566-CReAAH (Archéosciences) 5 Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) Etude des
  • , Morgan Macé, Jacques Le Deun, Eric Morize. 6 Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) Numérisation 3D Editions AMHOLLVED Société Trimble avec la participation d’Arnaud Lezennec, Senior Application Engineer
  • de bateaux, des bouées d’amarrage au port de l’Aber Benoît et des pilotes bénévoles. Sans cette aide, le budget alloué aurait été insuffisant face aux contraintes de transport vers l’île Guennoc. 7 Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de
  • Service Régional de l’Archéologie - Centre de documentation archéologiqu Campus universitaire de Beaulieu - Avenue Charles Foulon - 35700 Rennes 01/09/2018 Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) Chapitre I
  • technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) I.A - Localisation I.A.1 - Géographique Le nord-ouest du Finistère est réputé pour ses archipels qui sont présents sur tout le littoral. Certaines de ces îles sont accessibles à marée basse
  • d’autres îles complètement immergées aujourd’hui. La nécropole mégalithique se trouvait donc sur une butte qui surplombait tout un plateau. Ce dernier émerge 10 Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) à marée
  • feuilleté) (m)  Correspondant au gneiss et granite migmatitique 5 — Pegmatite de couleur rose (gros grain) (p) 6 — Leucogranite (couleur claire, peu fréquent) (4) 11 Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) 1
  • Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) I.B - Historiographie Les premières mentions archéologiques évoquant Guennoc datent de 1891 (Du Chatellier, 1891). Un pécheur trouva en février 1890 un dépôt de l’âge du Bronze
  • reproduction des sociétés de chasse qui en ont grand besoin depuis 13 Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) 2 ou 3 ans » (myxomatose) (Giot, 1956). Malheureusement, ces lapins sont toujours présents sur le site et
  • - Enclos Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) o Maison III 1967 : septième campagne - Cairn III o Extérieur o Chambre A’ o Couloir D  Restauration couloir o Façade transversale - Talus - Enclos o Maison II o
  • « Barnenez, Carn, Guennoc » fait la somme des interventions menées sur ces différents sites (Giot, 1987). Malheureusement, l’ouvrage est très condensé, résumant 15 Architectures et technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) douze
  • humaine quasi continue de l’Azilien jusqu’aux périodes modernes-contemporaines (Giot, 1982, 1987 ; Kayser, 1991 ; Briard et Onnée, 1996 ; Daire, 2008 ; Michel et Naudinot, 2009). P.-R. Giot a laissé un riche fonds documentaire sur les fouilles de Guennoc avec 1750 photos, notes
  • technologies des tumulus néolithiques bretons : la nécropole de Guennoc à Landéda (Finistère) néolithiques dirigé par Serge Cassen et Valentin Grimaud, ainsi que celles de la thèse d’Hervé Duval sur les sites fortifiés littoraux et insulaires de la façade Manche-Atlantique de l’Europe
  • actuelles. Le contexte insulaire préserve souvent les sites archéologiques de toute activité agricole intensive et de construction moderne. Toutefois, lorsqu’ils sont en bord de falaise ou sur estran, ces sites sont menacés par la remontée du niveau marin. Les fortes tempêtes sont
RAP00566.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • of fieldwork, itself part of a larger, mul t i -di sci pl i nary study of the relationship between land-u.se and settlement during the last two thousand years, took place from 21 March - 5 April and 6 -- 27 September in the communes of Ruffiac, Treal, St~Ni col as-du-Tertre , Carentoir, La
  • from T4, where three i nter-cutt i ng ditches were eut into the natural» It was only possible to section two of them in the time avail cible and the task of establishing the relationship between the three features was postponed until 1987» The sectioned ditches were bot h U-shaped
  • by the early post médiéval period (Asti 11 and Davies 1985s 92-5, 97)» If the occupation in T4 is prehistoric then it is the first of its kind for the? région and has important implications for survey work» Its low-lying position, in a wet valley bottom and sealed by 70cm of colluvium
  • pottery, and the saine conventions are hereby used to distinguish between thems fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five or more fragments of building material) have been termed 'sites'; fields in which one
  • in order to secure a wide range of possi b i 1 i t i es for testing; in fact, in many cases numbers were far higher than the necessary minimum. It should be stressed , yet again, that the ternis are conventions for di st i ngui shi ng between greater and lesser concentrations
  • .Land whiie 14/. were on south-f aci ng and 19.37. on east-facing slopes. Upland concentrât i on s were not especially notable, with only a quarter lying between the 50m and 75m contours (28. IX) 5 almost a half 1 ay between 25m and 50m (49.17.). Somewhat less than a half
  • ', work having begun in 1985 with investigation of the surrounding earthworks. The main aims of this enquiry were, firstly, to assess the state of archaeol ogi cal préservation and, secondly, 9 to cl i se over the rel at i onshi p between material found on the surface and subsoil
  • features, Work on the excavation was eventually abandoned in the main season because of the rising water table; however, the smal I team that returned in late April was able to complète the trial. Altogether excavationtook place on 8 days, with an average of 6 people per day, thereby
  • because of the weather. Quadrats with 6m si des were chosen since a smal 1er cutting could fall within a structure, failing to reveal its existence. However, in the later stages of the excavation a machine (JCB) was used to eut three 1m wide trenches to extend the investigation
  • 145 10m 0 10 20 F i g. 2 \4- 30 UQ 50 m H145 (Tréai ZB154a) This field was classified as a 'possible site' (médiéval) after •f i el dwal ki ng at 50m intervais in 1984» Intensive collection •from the whole of its surface in March 3.986 indicated smal 1 quanti ti es
  • arable land-use and smal 1 enclosures (çl_os) , with two buildings and ? walled yards inside its western edge - since démoli shed. The site of thèse buildings i s presumably now marked by a remembrement mound near the junction of the two road s. Excavation strategy was the same
  • as the depth increased, as did fragments of rock. The marked différence between the 1 atter and the bedrock, and their range (siltstones, grès Csandstone3, congl omerate , quartzite) suggest that they are plough scatter derivihg from nearby structures rather than from the local bedrock
  • . The depth of the plough soil varied between 30 and 50cm and in some places overlay the natural clay subsoil and in others the natural bedrock. No archaeol ogi cal features were encountered ., Trench 11 The plough soil was excavated by hand and found to be between 35 and 45cm deep. It 1
  • not reveal were any f eat ures ., Trench 12 The trench was excavated by machine and -for most of its 28m length merely provided a record of the depth of plough soil» However in its extrême north end a section of stone walling was excavated- The wall, 30cm high, consisted of coursed
  • fill contained only Iron Age pottery (3 and 4 sherds respect! vel y) , and the end of a small ditch or pit ( 50 ) . Trench 23 This trench was 42m long, and for the most part the plough soil (varying in depth between 25cm and 45cm) rested on the undi sturbed natural subsoil and schi
  • , nearest the settlement of Becul eu. A shallow (15cm) pit rnay be dated by the single médiéval sherd in its filling (5), and may be associated with other features which apparent 1 y constitute a roadway. A deep (2m) ditch or holloway (66) had either been eut or worn into the natural
  • ). The surface had been fragmented through plough destruction. Five mètres south of the holloway a ditch 1.5m wide and 45cm deep was excavated (.1.0); its filling contained one médiéval sherd of pottery (7, 8, 9). It was apparently on the same alignment as the holloway and had silted up
  • Its in the holloway wi 1 i provide an interesting comparison with those samples taken -from the lower plough soi 1 s in T24 and T25 , which may be expected to be colluvial in charaicter. ^1 H80 (Treal ZN4b) 1-180 is located right on the western edge of Treal commune, some 150m
  • T15 and T16 clearly do so. Although there is no défi ni te structural évidence, the assemblage coming from the pit group 7 can only be interpreted as settlement débris. The pottery forms suggest a very late Iron Age, or very early Roman , date» The similarity in form and fabric
  • between one rira found at HSO and one from A92 (see fig» 6, HBO-5 and A92-2) would perhaps argue for a date that spans the first centuries BC and AD» The 'Roman' character of the assemblage might also be suggested by the substantiel tiles for, although not very wel 1 fired