Rechercher sur le site

  • Chercher les documents contenant un mot OU un autre : tapez simplement les mots à la suite => bracelet bronze
  • Chercher les documents contenant un mot ET un autre : utilisez le mot-clef AND => bracelet AND bronze
  • Chercher les documents contenant une expression exacte : taper l'expression entre guillemets => "bracelet en bronze"

Limiter votre recherche

Auteur
Type d'opération
Commune
Département
Date (Année)

2009 résultats Exporter les résultats

Trier par Titre : ascendant / descendant
RAP00565.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • covered, encompassing 772 hectares (4.01% of the surface area of the four communes). 30.99kg of pottery and 93.92kg of man-made building material were recovered from the transects; 45% of the pottery was médiéval, 53.6% post-medieval and 1.4% Roman. No pre-Roman pottery was found
  • . As in previous years there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered material, and the same conventions are hereby used to distinguish between them: fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five
  • or more fragments of building material) have been termed 'sites 1 ; fields in which one unit produced five or more sherds or fragments of building material, and two or more neighbouring units produced one to four, or two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds or fragments
  • , have been termed 'probable sites'; fields in which there were irregular concentrations of material not covered by the above catégories - for example, one unit with five or more sherds of the same period - have been termed 'possible sites'. (The minimum number of finds necessary
  • and in toto.) Of thèse concentrations, none produced predominantly Roman material although 4.8% produced s orne Roman material; 27.3% had predominantly médiéval, 38.5% predominantly post-medieval, and 8.6% more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medieval sherds
  • . The remaining concentrations (25.7%) had a prédominance of building material, at présent treated as undatable. 2 As usual , the topographical position of the sites was analysed. About a third of them (29.4%) were on flat 1 and while 17.1% were on south-facing and 16.6% on south-east-f
  • cadastre, as usual. More than three-quarters of the concentrations (80.2%) lay more than 100m away from early nineteenth-century settlements and only 7.5% lay within 50m of them. (This is not signif icantly différent from distances from modem settlements). Surface material tends
  • and in the early 'nineteenth century (Astill and Davies 1982b: 21f, 31). Thèse cadastral suggestions coincided with fields that produced concentrations of surface material at the post-medieval 'site' C470 and, more arguably, the post-medieval 'probable site 1 C473, although no buildings were
  • , concentrations of surface material were most frequently found in the basin to the south of Ruffiac village (the centre of L) and in the nei ghbourhood of Trignac, in the north of Carentoir commune (F); however, sites were common throughout the southern halves of F and C, particularly
  • in the Coet Morel /Hôtel Orl and area (Carentoir). Surface material is markedly absent from fields on the northern and southern boundaries of L, on the east/west ridges (particularly on a band north west of Carentoir) and - as might be expected - on most steep slopes. There are again
  • or schi ste; the imported material is notably absent from fields cleared of woodl and since the 1 ate nineteenth century. Fieldwalking in 5m squares ('Total' Coll ecti on ) In order to investigate the nature of sites identified in transect walking, as in 1983 and 1984 some fields
  • /grey and red/yellow) and three sizes (1.5cm) in an attempt to find criteria for distinguishing between local and imported material. A107 lies just below a flat, exposed hilltop on a south-facing slope 75-80m high. The area was arable when the cadastral survey
  • was recorded, the field being the same size and shape as at présent but divided into bandes; an area of 1 ande lay to the north and the nearest settlement (La Boulardaie) lay 130m away. Pottery, building material and schi ste were collected from an area of 1 hectare, distributed ail over
  • similar to médiéval and modem pottery and could have been introduced on to the surface. The small quantities of archaeol ogical material recovered, and its gênerai distribution, suggest that it was brought on to the field in the course of manuring; quantities, pattern of distribution
  • and topographie position are similar to those of B319, walked in 1983 and also interpreted as a manuring scatter (Astill and Davies 1984a: 20). Six fields in the near vicinity were also walked at 50m intervais; thèse produced some material but no notable concentrations. D221 lies on the 45m
  • , and rather more variation than did the other fields, with some tendency for lower readings in the area of the brick/tile/Roman cl ustering. A pl atf orm at the north-western edge of the field produced little material of any type; it is likely that this area has been ploughed down
  • usters of other classes of material. 5 Excavations (EBS85 Tl and T2) Small -scale excavation of earthworks was undertaken in order to begin investigation of the soils and archaeology within field boundaries near sites identified in fieldwalking. As indicated previously, one
  • and 40cm, as was also true of the other material. The pottery, brick, tile and also this schi ste were probably brought on to the field in the course of manuring. Trench 2. The remains of a bank, only 20cm high, were found lying on the natural, midway along the trench. The bank
  • practice. Since the two trenches showed différent amounts of soil buildup and material in the two areas, changes in manuring practice rather than lapse in cultivation may be more relevant in explaining the data from Trench 1. The land-use around Trench 2 clearly changed when
  • and hal 1 . Local pronunci ation material collected while fieldwalking has again suggested that the influence of the vernacular language is évident in scattered parts of the study area; initial stress on Trignac and Kerhal , for example, are notable. Pi scussi on The 1985 season
RAP00566.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • pottery, and the saine conventions are hereby used to distinguish between thems fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five or more fragments of building material) have been termed 'sites'; fields in which one
  • unit produced five or more sherds or fragments of building material, and two or more neighbouring units produced one to four, gr. two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds or fragments, have been termed 'probable sites'; fields in which there were irregular
  • concentrations of material not covered by the above catégories for example, one unit with five or more sherds of the same period •- have been termed 'possible sites'. (The minimum number of finds necessary to quai if y a concentration for comment has been del i beratel y fixed at a 1 ow level
  • s 10 (3.5) 24 (8.4) 23 (8.1) 57 (207.) 285 per transect and in tôt o. ) Of thèse concentrations, none produced predomi nantly Roman material although 17.57» produced some Roman material;; 12.37. had predomi nanti y médiéval, 22.87. predomi nant 1 y post-medi eval , and 8.8
  • ?/. more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medi eval sherds» 43.9% of concentrations had a prédominance of building material, at présent treated as undatable; the remainder had more than the necessary minimum of pottery and. building material» Thèse figures
  • again stress the large quanti ti es of brick and tile, relatively large of Roman and smal 1 of médiéval pottery» The spatial distribution of this material i s as interesting as in previous years, and broadly consistent with it» There are 'blank' zones within the four communes
  • and also zones that tend to produce more or less of a surface scatter» Surface material is usually markedly absent from areas near the commune boundaries and is also difficult to find in the fields to the north of Qui 1 vain and around Le? Bois Faux; si gni f i cant 1 y , the more
  • intensive covera\ge achieved by rewalking many of the transects did not affect distribution patterns already noted» By contrast , concentrations of surface material are ^frequently found in zones around Le Cleu, La Touche (east of Treal) and - especially - in the southern half
  • of Transect G, from Métairie au Joly to Le Nouai-)» The figures quoted above demonstrate the remarkably high proportion of fields in G with large concentrations of surface material. The présence of tile scatters, sometimes with smal 1 quanti ties of Roman material associated, were notable
  • near the northern boundary of Transect D (a Roman road) and in the nei ghbourhood of Marsac , La Ruaudaie and La Roche Pèlerin» Analysis of the spatial distribution of imported local schi stes » parti cul arl y those used for roofing material s in the area, produces some equally
  • marked patterns» Such schi stes were présent on most fields (largely as a resuit of manuring), with the exception of some areas of 1 an de in the northern part of Transect B and of some isolated, scattered fields (D6 and 7, E267) with no other surface material. However , it was again
  • material; field E230, where there was also a large tile scatter, provided a parti cul arl y good example of this. Comparison of the distribution of surface material was made with the early n i neteenth-cent ur y p atterri of 1 and -use and settlement, as e v i d e n c e cl b y
  • and the latter proportion the same.) Surface material tends to be found within areas of ni net eenth-century arable, as always especially in bandes (1 itérai ly 'bande' , arable divided into tenant parcels) and the proportion was comparable?, though slightly smal 1er, with that of earlier
  • years (58,9% of concentrations in 1986, as compared with 70. 1% in 1985). The remainder occurred in n i net eenth-century meadow or pasture (an unusually high 12.5%), marginal 1 an de ( un c u 1 1 i vat ed land 10.77.), curtilage (5.47.) Concentrations of material in and areas
  • a 1 1 er n s i n t h emse 1 ves 31); such cadastral suggestions coincided and Davi.es 1982b. 21f o-î with a concentration >ur ace material at the 'probable site B85. As usual , the 1 opographic position of the sites was also analysed. Again, a third of them loo. OA) were on fiât
  • were walked (of which to be covered (see fig. B) » hectares (18% of the surface area 6 were in M), encompassing 257 of Transect N) . 7.86kg of pottery and 13.81kg of man-made building material were recovered from thèse transects; 1.37. of the pottery was pre-Roman „ 1% Roman, 29.7
  • % médiéval and 68% post-medi eval 5 six worked flints were? collected. One possible platform, a mound and ten lynchets were also noted. In accordance with the usual conventions, concentrations of surface material (total 51) may b e c 1 a s s i f i e d as f o 1 1 o w s r, Si tes ' ' Pr
  • -medi eval , and 11.87. more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medi eval sherds. 13.77 had a. prédominance of building material and the rest had more than the necessary minimum of building material and pottery. Despite the changes in topography and land
  • management the proportion of sites located and quanti ti es of material collected is entirely comparable with those in the four core communes. However , there is less médiéval material than has usual 1 y been found there and it was a considérable contrast to collect pre-Roman sherds from
  • the surface. However, the distribution pattern of material does not si gni f i cant 1 y deviate from that found in the core. There are again areas with little or no material 'blank ' zones - and areas with more or less of a surface scatter. So, material tends to concentrate in the La
RAP00568.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • ) of introduced stone pink siltstone (K-01M) , Brioverian shale (B2-3) , sandstone (02) and many lumps of fine black siltstone (03-4), of a quality often used for roofing, material which occurs natural ]y about lkm, away (58kg, 317. of stone excavated ) . A layer of yel 1 owi sh-brown sandy
  • is a good indicator of settlement in the near vicinity. In the case of the test pit T37 prehistoric pottery was recovered from the surface, but there were no sub-surface features of that date. It is impossible to suggest reasons for the soning of the prehistoric material on the surface
  • for rubbish; they may have been dug to obtain clay or stone. The small quantities of 5" locally obtained mudstone in some pits could represent some residual trace of stone-wor ki ng , given that the spindle whorl was o-f the same material. At some later phase in the Iron Age the area
  • Df the material in it, do not however suggest a midden but rather collapsed walls or some sort of bank. The absence of Roman material from the dump suggests that it was formed before the Roman period: the few Roman sherds found in the topsoil could have been derived from a very
  • material was obtained from T29 (as was reflected by the results D -f the total collection) but more Roman pottery was found. Time ran ont and the sites had to be backfilled at the point, when ditches were recognised (Asti 13. and Davies 1987, 118-21). In 1988 the excavation was resumed
  • of ceramic roof tile were recovered (43.88kg, 167 fragments), and the pottery consisted of 3 sherds of grey coarse ware and one sherd of central Gaul ish Samian. The absence of Ir on-Age f abri es and terra-ni qra-type pottery «and the présence of so much roofing material would suggest
  • that this ditch was filled (and perhaps eut) at a later date than ditches 5 and 10. Indeed it may have been filled during the 9 destruction o-f the buildings. Comment The fabric and forms of the pottery, similar to the material from HSO (excavated in 1986: Asti 11 and Davies 1987, 120-1
  • ) and A31/79 below, suggest a firstand second-century date for the occupation of the nearby, but still unlocated, structure. The later ditch (11) was filled with structural material from this building. The absence of post-second-century pottery from the excavations and fieldwalking
  • and A79 were first walked at 50m intervais in 1982; the material which was recovered concentrated where the two fields joined and was classified as a 'probable médiéval site'; Roman pottery was also noted. The field boundaries were subséquent 1 y changed and the eastern part of A31 has
  • been joined to A79. This new field, A31/79, therefore includes the area where the material had concentrated, as also part of the ridge and the whole valley side. In 1987 it was griddE*d in 5m squares for 'total collection. Relatively large quanti ti es of Roman pottery (1—3 sherds
  • o O o o ,0 , o sherds 0 Fig.S 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100m OO OOO o interesting assemblage (10) of tile and building stone, which suggested that material démoli shed from a substantiel building had been dumped in the ditch. The tile included fragments of floor tile
  • ditches. In T39 ditch 3 contained a large quantity of brick, tile and stone which appears to be the residue from a démoli shed building; when this ditch was further investigated in T46 there was, however, little démolition material; this implies that the buildings were located
  • was probably used for agricultural purposes in the Roman period and hence that the distribution of Roman pottery on the surface derived from manuring. However, the concentrations of brick and tile found in 'total' collection cannot be expiai ned in this way, since the material occurs
  • quantities of tile in most of the ditches therefore suggests that tile was dumped on A31/79 after the f i el ds/encl osures (and associated buildings from which the material may have been derived) had gone ont of use. The amounts of brick and tile were not, however, very great
  • material collected from this field originally suggested thaï i t was a likely site to find évidence of continuity from Roman into later periods, with its distribution of Roman, médiéval and post-medi eval pottery and brick and tile too, as wel 1 as earthworks. It is therefore very
  • , 28), and the upper courses of the main wall were also removed leaving some remains of the rubble core (6, 13). The whole area south of wall 7/51 was then spread with debr i s-packed layers - 11/25 in the west and 5 in the east; context 5 had a high proportion of roofing material
  • thick (4, 10, 23). A dump (12), largely of roofing material, was laid over some of this in the north-western corner of T38. Above thèse layers was the modem plough soil (3, 8), but some of the large blocks of walling may have protruded to cause plough damage, and were subsequently
  • south of wall 7/51 had far 1 ess material: 28 médiéval sherds, of which 27 were of Fabric 1, from context 5; 63 médiéval sherds, ail Fabric 1, from context 11; 9 sherds, ail Fabric 1, from context 25. The pottery was in a very good condition, surviving in large, unabraded sherds
  • (with both strap and rod handles) were made in Fabric 1, and there is clear indication of internai glazing. This discovery goes a long way towards explaining the apparent dearth of table wares in the material recovered from f i el dwal k i ng . Fine wares were however represented: Fabric
  • would overwhel mi ngl y suggest a twel-fthand thi rteenth-century date for the material in T32 and T38, although the fabrics themselves could strictly be a little earlier or two or three centuries later. It is also worth mentioning that a rim of céVami que onctueuse, a pottery type
RAP00567.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • of pottery, 161.72kg of man-made building material, 23 from thèse flints and 611.72g of haematite were recovered transects , together with two worked pièces of quartz (from M). This breaks down, by transect, as follows: Brick/tile kg 18. 49 P M 121 . 77 21 . 46 R Pre-Rom. Pottery 1 . 47
  • . 0. 767. 1 . 37. Table 1: Roman Medi eval Post -med . Wei ght Fl int Haemati te by no. kg Pot Pot Pot g 2. 72 1 3. 67 34 . 67. 61 . 17. 2. 97. 545 18 26. 01 347. 61. 57. 3 . 87. 64 4 86. 87. 3. 13 3.77. 8.27. proportions and quantities of material recorded As in the core
  • of building material) have been termed 'sites'; fields in which one unit produced five or more sherds or fragments of building material, and two or more neighbouring units produced one to four, or. two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds or fragments, have been termed
  • 'probable sites'; fields in which there were irregular concentrations of material not covered by the above catégories - for example, one unit with five or more sherds of the same period - have been termed 'possible sites'. (It should be stressed, yet again, that the terme are conventions
  • for di sti ngui shi ng between greater and lesser concentrations and for providing a means of référence to them; they do not necessarily dénote the location of former settl ements. ) In accordance with the conventions, the concentrations of surface material (total 219) may
  • .) 219 (25.57.) 858 Table 2: concentrations of surface material (percentage of fields walked per transect and in toto) Of thèse concentrations none had predomi nanti y Roman or prehistoric pottery but a small proportion had some Roman or pre-Roman sherds. Some concentrations had
  • predomi nanti y médiéval or predomi nanti y post-medi eval sherds, others more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medi eval sherds, and others had a prédominance of man-made building material. The proportions of such concentrations are as follows, by transect
  • of surface scatters Di scussi on Clearly the character of the surface material differs from transect to transect. Transects P and M had areas which produced a little pre-Roman pottery - as had Transect N - a phenomenon that is extremely rare in the core communes (Asti 11 and Davies 1986
  • : 115). P is notable for its relatively high proportion of fields with significant concentrations of surface material, high by comparison both with Transects M and R as also by comparison with the core, where fields with notable concentrations averaged only 24.27. of those walked
  • of material (15.67. 'possible', 177. 'probable' and 4.57. 'site'). Transect M itself produced unusually high quanti ti es of brick and tile, and a high proportion of its concentrations were characterized by brick and tile - some of which had Roman pottery associated. Transect R was notable
  • for its very 1 ow proportions of médiéval pottery and very high of post-medi eval . Thèse results are striking by comparison with patterns of material recovered from the four core communes. Whereas the amounts of Roman material collected from the surface are mue h the same, the amounts
  • and proportions of médiéval material are 1 ower (especially in R) - as in N - while those of post-medi eval material are considerably higher, though not as high as in N; in the core 507. of pottery collected from the surface was médiéval and 46.77. post-medi eval . The proportion
  • of concentrations characterized by médiéval pottery is much lower than in the core (where it was 54.77.), and that by post-medi eval much higher (20.47. in the core). The overall distribution of material nevertheless shares some characteristics with that in the core. Again there are 'blank
  • scatter with Roman material lies near the bourg of Comblessac and not on some distant periphery, as is more usual . In Transect M there were 'blank' areas on the banks of the River Aff and its tributaries but most notable was a very marked and very large 'blank' zone in the commune
  • . Thereafter, although there are a few 'blank' fields in the nei ghbourhood of Pipriac it is again marked that there are very few from Pipriac east to the Vilaine. The contrast between this area and that to the west of it is very striking. The distribution of material in relation
  • to existing settlements was much the same as found in the core communes, with slightly fewer concentrations at distances above 300m from modem dwellings. In ail cases material tends to occur within 50 and 300m of settlements - in P, for example, 33.37. of concentrations lie within 100
  • and 200m, 357. in M, 25.87. in R. The most notable character i st i c is the fact that the highest proportions of material do not occur in the immédiate vicinity of settlements; patterns in the core are extremely comparable. Walking within the town of Malestroit and on the edges
  • of Pipriac was interesting. Some small plots beside houses in the town contained more médiéval material than post-med i eval . Near Pipriac, although some médiéval fabrics were recovered, post-medi eval sherds were far more notable. The distribution of material in gênerai reflects
  • used locally for building, especially roofing, materials was also recorded for each field (though not collected). Thèse materials were not carried for long distances (10—20km maximum) but can usually be clearly di st i ngui shed from local natural , and o-f ten have nail holes
  • significant. In Transect P there are none of thèse materials on the high ground west of Ruffiac boundary, precisely in those areas which produced no surface pottery either; there are also no pink schi stes in and around Malestroit and close to the River Oust. In Transect M there are none
RAP03345.pdf (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil : Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de FP)
  • Service Départemental d’archéologie du Morbihan / SDAM) et du Ministère de la Culture (via le Service Régional de l’Archéologie de Bretagne). La Mairie de Quiberon a fourni une aide sous forme logistique particulièrement appréciable et même déterminante pour la bonne marche de cette
RAP02794.pdf (LARMOR-BADEN (56). Gavrinis : à la recherche des représentations d'une tombe à couloir du IVe millénaire. rapport d'opération)
  • Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication – Conseil général du Morbihan CNRS, ENSA, Université de Nantes 2012 G AVRINIS (Larmor-Baden, Morbihan) A la recherche des représentations d’une tombe à couloir du IVe millénaire (2). Rapport d’opération de relevés pariétaux et
  • Culture (CG56), a également suivi avec attention le développement de l’entreprise ; nous avons été sensibles à ses encouragements. Les subventions octroyées par le département du Morbihan et le ministère de la Culture ont été gérées par le responsable administratif de l’UFR Histoire
  • consistera à proposer une interprétation historique du monument, des vestiges de la culture matérielle recueillie au fil des explorations, enfin des gravures qui en font un objet unique en Europe, n'est pas intégrée au programme ; elle sera un prolongement logique de l'opération, mais
  • d’opération - Levés d’architecture et d’art pariétal réduits en taille et d’en extraire des images fixes à basse résolution. De nouvelles expériences verront le jour à l’occasion d’un programme d’étude sur le site de la tombe mégalithique Table des Marchands (ACR Ministère de la Culture
  • /Noninvasive_recording_technologies_for_the_study_and_conservation_of_prehistoric_rock_art_t he_dolmen_of_Dombate Un diaporama complet du programme en cours vient d’être projeté à l’occasion de l’International Congress on Science and Technology for the Conservation of Cultural Heritage conduit au sein de l’université de Santiago de Compostela (02/10 - 05/10/2012) en co
  • -organisation avec le CSIC (équivalent du CNRS en Espagne) et la Escuela Superior de Conservación y Restauración de Bienes Culturales de Galice. http://www.usc.es/ciqus/es/eventos/international-congress-science-and-technologyconservation-cultural-heritage • Toujours en Galice, une des tombes
RAP02248.pdf (PAIMPONT (35). le Bois Jacob : activité minière et réduction directe à partir du Ier âge du fer. les glyorels I et II : ateliers et bas fourneaux du 2nd âge du fer. rapport de prospection thématique et de sondages)
  • pins IV. CONCLUSION GENERALE ET PERSPECTIVES P. 87 BIBLIOGRAPHIE p. 88 2 Je remercie le ministère de la Culture (D.RA.C. Bretagne, Service Régional de l'Archéologie), pour le financement principal de cette opération archéologique de prospection thématique, portant sur la
RAP03240.pdf (PLOUEZOC'H (29). Grand cairn de Barnenez : nouvelles approches, nouveaux résultats, nouvelles perspectives. Rapport de FP 2015)
  • microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy have made possible to characterise the materials present. The minerals α-quartz, albite, microcline, muscovite, phlogopite, celadonite, beryl and anatase have been identified in the granitic rocks supporting the paintings
  • as additional components of the paint in some cases. Contamination with modern tracing materials (polystyrene and ε-copper-phthalocyanine blue) has been detected in several cases. The presence of pigments as decorative elements in megalithic monuments of Western France and its possible
  • relation with those of the Iberian Peninsula create interest- ing expectations for the knowledge of the European megalithic culture. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Additional supporting information may be found in the online version of this article at the publisher’s web site
  • Jean Jaurés, Maison de la Recherche 5, allée Antonio Machado, 31058 Toulouse Cedex 9, France specimens.[8,10,12,13] Orthostats Hernanz et al. A. pictorial materials have been analysed by in situ μ-RS. Some microspecimens from carefully selected points have been removed in order
  • and use of the megaliths. To assess the presence of painted decorations in such a characteristic megalithic region as Brittany is an effort with evident consequences for the knowledge of the megalithic culture in Atlantic Europe. Archaeological background The chosen megaliths
  • . Nevertheless, because of their solid consistency, the surface with pictorial materials of the specimens 6 and 1, from the chamber H of Barnenez tumulus and Mane Rutual monument respectively, have been studied with no physical treatments prior to their analyses. The resulting spectral data
  • have been analysed using the CASA XPS software and RSF database for peak fitting and Shirley background correction. The binding energy has been referenced to the adventitious C 1 s peak at 285 eV. Results and discussions Pictorial materials from eight French megalithic sites
  • light can be used to obtain a reference pattern of these signals. Some surprising materials have been discovered in the specimens 2, 3 and 6, Fig. 4. Microparticles of the synthetic polymer polystyrene have been detected in the specimen 3, Fig. 4a. A saturated Figure 1
  • carbon; ca, calcite; h, haematite. Eritrean rock art site suggested the presence of bixbyite and haussmanite.[32] In fact, the large half bandwidth of the band indicates a not well-crystallised material; this makes its assignment difficult. Moreover, the asymmetry of the band admits
  • of these materials in the paints could be attributed to inappropriate tracing techniques over the painted surfaces. Intense spectral background of fluorescence radiation dominates the in situ μ-RS spectra of a series of pictographs in this chamber, Fig. S6 (Supporting Information). Nevertheless
  • also indicate that besides α-quartz, albite and muscovite. considered as contamination from an external source, such as a the granitic orthostat contains anatase, Fig. 3g. The contents in Na marker pen and tracing materials. The chambers of this tumulus and K of the specimen 2
  • have made difficult to obtain in situ the different monuments and stelae are collected in Fig. S30 μ-RS spectra of the pictorial materials, Figs S16 and S29BC (Supporting Information) and Table 2, respectively. Significant changes (Supporting Information). Intense fluorescence
  • of fungi living over the paintings in closed chambers of the monuments. Intense fluorescence emission and Raman bands from the fungi References masked the bands from the pictorial materials. Only bands from the rock components have been able to detect in several cases.[1] P. Bueno
RAP03440 (SAINT-CARADEC (22). Bel-Air. Rapport de fouille)
  • d’un contrôle et d’une validation par les services de l’Etat (SRA Bretagne), il sera procédé au remblaiement des terres issues du décapage des deux secteurs afin de restituer le niveau de sol actuel et permettre une remise en culture des terres agricoles. Ce remblaiement sera
RAP03364.pdf (PLOUGASTEL-DAOULAS (29). Le Rocher de l'Impératrice. Rapport de FP 2014-2016)
  • synthèse de l’opération pluriannuelle 2014-2016 10 Rocher de l’Impératrice (Plougastel-Daoulas, Finistère) Rapport de synthèse de l’opération pluriannuelle 2014-2016 Abstract: Our understanding of Lateglacial societies experienced a revival these last years in Western France. Our
  • knowledge of these groups is however unequaled: if the Late Azilian and the Pleistocene/Holocene transition communities are now well known after some recent works, this is not the case of the Magdalenian and first Azilian societies. The launching of a research program in 2013 in a small
  • regular blades, setting up of meticulous production methods, use of non-local raw material, few evidences of “en éperon” preparations), but also testify of a clear progression to the Azilian (systematic use of soft hammerstone, disappearance of bladelets productions, and corollary
  • and symbolic changes during the Azilian. The Rocher de l’Impératrice rock shelter is an unavoidable site for the understanding of Northwestern Europe Lateglacial societies. Because of the diversity of the archaeological evidences this site allows to develop a global thought about the nature
RAP01768.pdf (le mésolithique en Bretagne. rapport de projet collectif de recherches)
  • pour chaque matière, afin de préciser où se situent les choix techniques (prédilection pour certaines dimensions des supports, pour leur régularité, ou encore pour la productivité des blocs). Le rôle de la géographie sur le développement des cultures doit être abordé avec l'effet de
  • culturelles définies par la culture matérielle (Groupe de Bertheaume, Téviecien). L'exploration approfondie de certains sites semble maintenant nécessaire, pour construire des ensembles archéologiques de référence et affiner le cadre chrono-culturel. Il est également impératif d'obtenir de
RAP03621 (QUIMPER (29). Kersaliou : Un habitat groupé du Bronze moyen/final. Rapport de fouille préventive)
RAP03648 (LANNION (22). Route de Petit Camp : un ensemble funéraire et un habitat de l'âge du Bronze. Rapport de fouille)
  • culture des terres agricoles. Ce remblaiement sera effectué par un prestataire de l’Inrap (terrassier) à l’aide de 10/13 I. Données administratives, techniques et scientifiques Projet d'intervention moyens mécaniques appropriés, sous le contrôle de l’établissement, comme précisé
RAP03190.pdf (PLOUGASTEL-DAOULAS (29). Le rocher de l'Impératrice. Rapport intermédiaire 2015 de FP 2014-2016)
  • ar c'humuniezhoù azilian kentañ se. 6 Rapport intermédiaire 2015 - Rocher de l’Impératrice (Plougastel-Daoulas, Finistère) Abstract: Our understanding of Lateglacial societies experienced a revival these last years in Western France. Our knowledge of these groups is however
  • unequaled: if the Late Azilian and the Pleistocene/Holocene transition communities are now well known after some recent works, this is not the case of the Magdalenian and first Azilian societies. The launching of a research program in 2013 in a small rock shelter discovered by M. Le
  • methods, use of non-local raw material, few evidences of “en éperon” preparations), but also testify of a clear progression to the Azilian (systematic use of soft hammerstone, disappearance of bladelets productions, and corollary, development of a weaponry essentially constituted
  • de l’Impératrice rock shelter is an unavoidable site for the understanding of Northwestern Europe Lateglacial societies. Because of the diversity of the archaeological evidences this site allows to develop a global thought about the nature and rhythm of the transformation
RAP01557.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport final de synthèse de fouille programmée 1996-1998)
  • de l'Université de Bretagne Occidentale à Brest, et Barry Cunliffe, de l'Institute of Archaeology de l'Université d'Oxford (GrandeBretagne). Nous avons reçu le soutien financier du Ministère de la Culture, du Conseil Général des Côtes-d'Armor, de la British Academy et de
  • 432) s'accumulèrent derrière cette structure. Epais de près de 0,50m, ces niveaux montrent des différences de texture et de couleur laissant penser qu'il s'agit de dépôts anthropiques, résultant peut-être de cultures en plates-bandes semblables à celles déjà reconnues dans la