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RAP00565.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • . As in previous years there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered material, and the same conventions are hereby used to distinguish between them: fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five
  • and in toto.) Of thèse concentrations, none produced predominantly Roman material although 4.8% produced s orne Roman material; 27.3% had predominantly médiéval, 38.5% predominantly post-medieval, and 8.6% more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medieval sherds
  • acing slopes. Upland concentrations were less notable than in 1984 (transects H, J, K) with only a quarter lying between the 50m and 75m contours; more than half 1 ay between 25m and 50m (59.9%), as in the other Carentoir transects. Only 35.3% of sites 1 ay within 250m of streams
  • that are mapped, far less than in 1984, while a further 39% were up to 500m, and 25.6% more than 500m, away; it was largely sites in F that caused this anomaly. Comparison was systematical ly made with the early nineteenth-century pattern of land-use and settlement, as evidenced by the ancien
  • cadastre, as usual. More than three-quarters of the concentrations (80.2%) lay more than 100m away from early nineteenth-century settlements and only 7.5% lay within 50m of them. (This is not signif icantly différent from distances from modem settlements). Surface material tends
  • , and rather more variation than did the other fields, with some tendency for lower readings in the area of the brick/tile/Roman cl ustering. A pl atf orm at the north-western edge of the field produced little material of any type; it is likely that this area has been ploughed down
  • conditions prevailed on another three. Excavation therefore had to be more limited than was intended. The excavation strategy was similar to that used by Martin Bell to sample lynchets and valley bottoms in the south of England (Bell 1977; 1983). A 2m-wide trench, 14m long, was eut across
  • practice. Since the two trenches showed différent amounts of soil buildup and material in the two areas, changes in manuring practice rather than lapse in cultivation may be more relevant in explaining the data from Trench 1. The land-use around Trench 2 clearly changed when
  • no, or next to no, material. As in 1984, even fields with inhabited structures in the early nineteenth century produced no more material than that sufficient to qualify as a 'possible site' (F212); and, as noted above, most of the high concentrations occurred more than 100m from présent
  • as coniferous) can hardly be more than two hundred years old. In such ways surface scatters, in association with other évidence, are beginning to suggest precisely localisable changes in land-use, especially during the 1 ast millenium. This year also saw a major attack on the problem
  • of the local schi stes. The problem is a simple one: because of outcrops and deep ploughing, fields more often than not have a surface scatter of freshly broken and/or abraded schi ste; schiste is also the most common building material in use in the study area between the seventeenth
  • or more fragments of building material) have been termed 'sites 1 ; fields in which one unit produced five or more sherds or fragments of building material, and two or more neighbouring units produced one to four, or two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds or fragments
  • , have been termed 'probable sites'; fields in which there were irregular concentrations of material not covered by the above catégories - for example, one unit with five or more sherds of the same period - have been termed 'possible sites'. (The minimum number of finds necessary
  • to qualify a concentration for comment has been de! iberately fixed at a low level in order to secure a wide range of possibil ities for testing; in fact, in many cases numbers were far higher than the necessary minimum. It should be stressed, yet again, that the terms are conventions
  • and in the early 'nineteenth century (Astill and Davies 1982b: 21f, 31). Thèse cadastral suggestions coincided with fields that produced concentrations of surface material at the post-medieval 'site' C470 and, more arguably, the post-medieval 'probable site 1 C473, although no buildings were
  • were the subject of more intensive study: four fields (A107, D221, B216, B347) were gridded in 5m squares so that everything on the surface of the fields, including schiste, might be collected. A107 had been classified as a 'possible site', with comparable amounts of médiéval
  • in the area. Samples were taken from Trench 1 and Trench 2; more will be taken during the summer; and micromorphological analysis will begin in September. The samples taken from 'total' collection sites in 1984 for phosphate analysis have ail been processed and a study was made
  • and magnetic suscepti bil i ty readings were taken at mètre intervais along transects intersecting in the middle of an unexcavated building. In gênerai both magnetic susceptibil ity readings and phosphate quantities were very low, at less than 10 Si/kg and lOOppm, but over the site
  • - large quantities indicate 1 ate médiéval and/or early modem (twelfthto seventeenth- century) activity. Indeed, further, surface finds suggest that settlements throughout the modem period may have generated less than 50m of scatter: in L90 finds occurred within 20m of the buildings
  • black and grey.) This needs more observation and more testing but at présent it suggests that the présence of pink-purple imported roofing schi ste is an indicator of areas of 1 ate médiéval and early modem arable while its absence is an indicator of land more recently taken
RAP00566.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • of man-made building mater i al were recovered frorn the transects; 6.47. of the pottery was Roman, 34.87. médiéval and 58.8?/;, post-medi evail » This is consi derabl y more brick and tile than recovered in each previous season, rather more Roman pottery and rather less médiéval. Ten
  • pottery, and the saine conventions are hereby used to distinguish between thems fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five or more fragments of building material) have been termed 'sites'; fields in which one
  • ?/. more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medi eval sherds» 43.9% of concentrations had a prédominance of building material, at présent treated as undatable; the remainder had more than the necessary minimum of pottery and. building material» Thèse figures
  • the ancien cadastre , as usua 1 . More than three-quarters of concentrations of pottery (76.7V.) 1 ay more than 100m away from early n i net eenth-century settlements and only 12» 5% 1 ay within 50m of them» (The former is only slightly higher than distances from modem settlements
  • of the? sites 1 ay within 250m of mapped streams (427.) , while more than a quarter (31.57.) were more than 500m away from them. £< . Samplinq ou.tside the core transects Sampling outside the core was organisée) in 2km radiating from it and thèse were walked in the s ame way as in one
  • and their property less dispersed, with more cattle and altogether a more wealthy air; and, despite récent in the core. remembrement , fewer remembrement mounds than Transect M, running slightly south 01 east from the south~-e?ast corner of Carentoir, was bequn, but most of it remains 209 fields
  • -medi eval , and 11.87. more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medi eval sherds. 13.77 had a. prédominance of building material and the rest had more than the necessary minimum of building material and pottery. Despite the changes in topography and land
  • material lower down the si ope. The collection also produced smal 1 and sporadic amounts of Iron Age pottery (no more than three sherds in any five-metre square). Although road changes make corrélation difficult, it seems that a t. t h e ti me o f the ancien cadastre K 446 was part
  • a 1 ow and even scatter of médiéval and post-medi eval pottery; small quanti ties of Iron Age pottery were also recovered (not more than two sherds from a five-metre square), most coming from the western third of the field. Médiéval and post-med i eval pottery distribution
  • unit produced five or more sherds or fragments of building material, and two or more neighbouring units produced one to four, gr. two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds or fragments, have been termed 'probable sites'; fields in which there were irregular
  • concentrations of material not covered by the above catégories for example, one unit with five or more sherds of the same period •- have been termed 'possible sites'. (The minimum number of finds necessary to quai if y a concentration for comment has been del i beratel y fixed at a 1 ow level
  • in order to secure a wide range of possi b i 1 i t i es for testing; in fact, in many cases numbers were far higher than the necessary minimum. It should be stressed , yet again, that the ternis are conventions for di st i ngui shi ng between greater and lesser concentrations
  • and also zones that tend to produce more or less of a surface scatter» Surface material is usually markedly absent from areas near the commune boundaries and is also difficult to find in the fields to the north of Qui 1 vain and around Le? Bois Faux; si gni f i cant 1 y , the more
  • y managed landscapes associated with pet i ts further investigation because such château;-: , also warrant areas tend more traces of earlier landscapes. to préserve Add i t i on al 1 in some parts cadastral land— use, naming and road suggest. former settlement sites (Asti 11 p
  • .Land whiie 14/. were on south-f aci ng and 19.37. on east-facing slopes. Upland concentrât i on s were not especially notable, with only a quarter lying between the 50m and 75m contours (28. IX) 5 almost a half 1 ay between 25m and 50m (49.17.). Somewhat less than a half
  • management the proportion of sites located and quanti ti es of material collected is entirely comparable with those in the four core communes. However , there is less médiéval material than has usual 1 y been found there and it was a considérable contrast to collect pre-Roman sherds from
  • the surface. However, the distribution pattern of material does not si gni f i cant 1 y deviate from that found in the core. There are again areas with little or no material 'blank ' zones - and areas with more or less of a surface scatter. So, material tends to concentrate in the La
  • of local naturals and there are consequently far more fields with a mixture of black and pink/purple roofing schi stes , often with a prédominance of the pink. However, there were still zones that could be di st i ngui shed s black roofing schi stes overwhel mi ngl y predomi nated
  • , are still in use?» Concentrations of material in N tend to be on higher land (ail over 50m and 58,27» over 75m), reflecting the generally higher topography, and tend to be cl oser to streams (517. within 250m of a mapped stream) . Fewer sites are on flat land (14.37.) than is gênerai
  • in the core, and more are on south- (32.7), north(18.47.) and west--facing (12.27.) slopes - again reflecting the h i g h er t op og r ap h y „ Excavations. Al 16 Excavation was designed to sample the medieva\l settlement. of Al 16, located by fieldwalking and classified as a "site
RAP00567.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered pottery, and the usual conventions are hereby used to distinguish between them: fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five or more fragments
  • predomi nanti y médiéval or predomi nanti y post-medi eval sherds, others more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medi eval sherds, and others had a prédominance of man-made building material. The proportions of such concentrations are as follows, by transect
  • of Pipriac was interesting. Some small plots beside houses in the town contained more médiéval material than post-med i eval . Near Pipriac, although some médiéval fabrics were recovered, post-medi eval sherds were far more notable. The distribution of material in gênerai reflects
  • of building material) have been termed 'sites'; fields in which one unit produced five or more sherds or fragments of building material, and two or more neighbouring units produced one to four, or. two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds or fragments, have been termed
  • 'probable sites'; fields in which there were irregular concentrations of material not covered by the above catégories - for example, one unit with five or more sherds of the same period - have been termed 'possible sites'. (It should be stressed, yet again, that the terme are conventions
  • of concentrations characterized by médiéval pottery is much lower than in the core (where it was 54.77.), and that by post-medi eval much higher (20.47. in the core). The overall distribution of material nevertheless shares some characteristics with that in the core. Again there are 'blank
  • two groups of 'blank' fields south east and south west of Comblessac. Together thèse zones suggest that the settlement of Comblessac and its immediately dépendent arable may have been rather small, much smaller than the centres in the core communes: it is notable that a tile
  • scatter with Roman material lies near the bourg of Comblessac and not on some distant periphery, as is more usual . In Transect M there were 'blank' areas on the banks of the River Aff and its tributaries but most notable was a very marked and very large 'blank' zone in the commune
  • there are finds from the Rance/ Vi 1 ai ne river Systems and one sherd from Pipriac is already known (Galliou 1977: 91-2). The médiéval fabrics from this eastern région seem to have less mica, fewer spi cul es and more grog. Some of the fields with Roman material are of particular interest
  • where a 'temple' is sited (R8) , was observed to have a ploughed-out stone building, apparently unrecorded and suggesting a larger complex of buildings than has previously been supposée) Gai 1 i a 1977). Slag was collected from both R8 and R9; that from RS is tap slag, produced
RAP00568.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • without more extensive investigation. The séquence from T36 is important. The trench was sited on the highest part of the field, near the top of the slope, yet it has a much deeper stratification than T37 lower down the slope. The buried soil 32, with its charcoal, might represent
  • the stone in the plough soil of T36 included plenty of introduced building stone, which must have been carried more than 1 km to this spot; this stone, then, may in tact dérive from the collapse of some nearby structure of médiéval date (cf. H132 below). It is just possible
  • , loosely compacted quart:-: pebble conglomerate and riverine gravel . The lower fill (17) had more stone (47.7kg) than the upper (16: 19.6kg): the différence may reflect two separate dumps of soil; the cleanness of the fillings, the comparât i vel y small number of finds and the lack
  • pottery (maximum 5 sherds per square) was more evenly spread. Smal 1 quanti ti es of brick and tile (maximum 0 .5kg per square) were uhevenl y distributed, but tended to concentrate in the south of the field, away from the cl Lister i ng of pre—médiéval and médiéval pottery
  • at the base of context 2, eut into what looked like a buried soil (32). AI 1 had si mi 1 ar fills of yel 1 owi sh-brown sandy loam with charcoal flecks. On the north side of the trench part of a large pit was excavated (3: lm wide, 0.42m deep > . It had a lower fi II with sliqhtly more
  • charcoal (16) and smail 1 fragments of mudstone; this produced two smal 1 and abraded sherds of Iron-Age pottery (Fabric 86); the upper fill (15) had no finds. Another pit was also found in the north section (22: lm wide, 0.42m deep) whose fill (23) had no finds but more mudstone
  • and smal 1 quantiti.es of post-medi eval pottery, but it is more difficLilt to explain the rather ni gh quanti ty and the concentration of médiéval pottery - thèse would be better expiai ned by référence to occupation context s or middens in that field. The difficulties of digging
  • Roux) documented from eighteenth and fifteenth centuries respect! vel y , with a possible médiéval structure near T36 (see fig. 2). It is potentially of the highest significance for long—terni settlement history and would merit a much more extensive investigation. A92 (Ruffiac
  • material was obtained from T29 (as was reflected by the results D -f the total collection) but more Roman pottery was found. Time ran ont and the sites had to be backfilled at the point, when ditches were recognised (Asti 13. and Davies 1987, 118-21). In 1988 the excavation was resumed
  • and irnplied that p>lough damage was greater than anticipated. 4m of the 6m length of the exposed ditch was excavated: it was steep sided with a fiai, bottom (0.8m deep and 1.3m wide). The ditch sloped down towards the east. It was filied with a silty soil with rounded quartz pebbles
  • to that of 10. The finds, though more plentiful, were similar in range: 14 sherds of grey coarse ware jars, 4 sherds of ter ra-ni qra -type pottery, 6 sherds of Iron-Age fabric and two pièces of ceramic tile were found. There was another ditch (11) in the south of the trench, eut
  • into natural. The edges were not as clearly defined as ditch 5, and the profile was more irregular; a 2m length was excavated, which was 0.6m deep and 1.2m wide. Although it was parallel with 5, its filling (12) was much sandier and the range of finds was différent. Large quanti ties
  • that this ditch was filled (and perhaps eut) at a later date than ditches 5 and 10. Indeed it may have been filled during the 9 destruction o-f the buildings. Comment The fabric and forms of the pottery, similar to the material from HSO (excavated in 1986: Asti 11 and Davies 1987, 120-1
  • suggests that the building did not stand long after the second century, and hence that this ditch fill from the building took place at or shortly after that time. It is difficult to suggest a function for the earlier ditch (5 and 10) other than for drainage. The présence of Iron-Age
  • ) by machine in order to understand a feature. The archaeological préservation was of varying quality; features were only located if they penetrated the natural subsoil. On the ridge and top of the slope the features had clearly been truncated by ploughing so that few were deeper than 0.1
  • dug parallel, 6.4m apart. Ditch 19, 1.75m wide and 0.6 m deep, had within its fill (20) two sherd s of late Iron- Age/ear 1 y Roman pottery (Fabric 13) and 6 small pièces of iron— working slag. The more northerly ditch, 2:4, had a primary silt (60) with no finds and then a loam
  • to have been a Spanish amphora; the upper fill (58) produced no finds. The eastern edge of the ditch had been eut into by a group of four pits. Pit 77 was dug first, and then three more -71, 73 and 75: none of the fills produced finds (76, 70, 72, 74). A mètre down slope
  • the ridge to at least mid-slope. The worn condition of the pottery, some of which lies beneath the modem plough soi 1 , suggests that it lies in plough soi 1 rather than midden or destruction layer. Indeed, it may wel 1 have arr i ved on the field as a by-product of manuring; hence
  • ., that of A92 being cl oser to the excavation than that of A31/79. The date range of the pottery from both sites is the same. Excavations on A31/79 suggest that the résidence was near the field, but not necessarily on it, and that the field itself was used for agricultural purposes while
  • ) and then the stones laid on top (51) (fig. 6). This wall, like 7 and 41, had very large blocks of quartz, altered schi ste and conglomerate in its base, and had similar stone to 7 in its other 365kg, although it had more quartzite (7%), more Cambrian siltstone (27.) and 1 ess altered schi ste (22
RAP01557.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport final de synthèse de fouille programmée 1996-1998)
RAP01768.pdf (le mésolithique en Bretagne. rapport de projet collectif de recherches)
RAP01714.pdf (PLOUHINEC (29). "ménez-drégan I". rapport intermédiaire 2000 de fp 3 (2000-2002))
  • be found and analysed by PCR only in the more recent bones. However, some of them also contain preserved DNA in an insoluble form. In conclusion, DNA can be preserved over much longer periods of time than previously expected. It is found closely associated to components that presumably
  • 00 / 00 "8 t. • S? S O O SE r S q i' S Í I I.S- IH J »• o A, • / 5.1 - DNA infossil bones can survive longer than 100.000 years in an insoluble form "IV. International Conference on Bone Diagenesis", 4-7 Mai 2000, Albarracin, Espagne résumé intitulé "Bone diagenesis IV
  • " Depurination of DNA in solution occurs at a rate which has led to the prediction that DNA older than 5000 years could not be preserved'. However, mitochondrial DNA in fossils estimated to be around 40.000 years old has been amplified^ showing the limits of this extrapolation. Indeed
  • that it prevents up to now conventional extraction and PCR amplification. To validate this approach, more recent, morphologically well preserved and palaeontologically determined bones from various periods (from Neolithic to modem times) are now being investigated. Current results show
  • that molecular hybridisation is still the most adequate approach to analyse DNA in fossil bones regardless of its solubility. So far, soluble DNA can be found and analysed by PCR only in the more recent bones. However, some of them also contain preserved DNA in an insoluble form
  • . In conclusion, DNA can be preserved over much longer periods of time than previously expected in a form stably associated to other fossil components. This presumably shields DNA from chemical and microbial degradation allowing this amazing preservation. However, this association presently
  • résumé intitulé "Ancient DNA V" Extrapolation of the rate of DNA degradation m solution has led to the prediction that DNA older than 5000 years could not be preserved. However, the existence of DNA in fossils estimated to be around 30.000 years old has been reported showing
  • these results, more recent bones from various periods (from Neolithic to modern times) are now being investigated. Ciurent results show that molecular hybridisation is still the most adequate approach to analyse DNA in fossil bones regardless of its solubility. So far, soluble DNA can
RAP02135.pdf (les demeures aristocratiques de la cité des vénètes. rapport de prospection thématique.)
  • Lieu-dit (de ri.G.N.) : Nom du site : Année première mention Kl MORE»IRA. .M Département : Cadastre Données cximplé(Tientaires= [ \l |p } 0(3j Année = rue du Cr^ptoe . 3SCH4 fU«*rt Crdejc Contours | . M lOl Ol 12 ISIOU1 . 13 15 IO Rayon du site (métrés) : [ j —/ 10
RAP01776.pdf (PABU (22). Les ateliers de potiers. Rapport de prospection thématique)
  • was motivated by the lack of accurate has been to explore to what degree the knowledge of this craft could be on deepend. Two directions have been chosen above ail, the research of text and the location of places of productions. In both cases, the results are more than satisfactory
RAP02332.pdf (PAIMPONT (35). le Bois Jacob. rapport de fouille programmée annuelle)
  • the carbon which may best represent the time event of interest. When interpreting the results, it is important to consider the pretreatments. Some samples cannot be fully pretreated, making their 14C ages more subjective than samples which can be fully pretreated. Some materials receive
RAP03345.pdf (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil : Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de FP)
Noyal-Châtillon-sur-Seiche. Église Saint-Léonard (NOYAL-CHATILLON-SUR-SEICHE (35). Eglise Saint-Léonard. Rapport de diagnostic)
RAP02918.pdf (HOËDIC (56). groah denn. rapport de fp 2013)
RAP02046.pdf (PAIMPONT (35). paléosidérurgie diachronique du massif de Paimpont. le vert pignon III : découverte de fours métallurgiques en activité autour du XVe siècle. rapport de prospection thématique avec sondages)
  • pretreatments and, where applicable, the two sigma calendar calibration range. ' As always, this report has been both mailed and sent electronically. Ail results (excluding some inappropriate material types) which are less than about 20,000 years BP and more than about -250 BP include
  • to isolate 14 C which may best represent the time event of interest. When interpreting the results, it is important to considerthe pretreatments. Some samples cannot be fully pretreated, making their 14 C âges more subjective than samples which can be fully pretreated. Some materials
  • . This is a spécial case where soil conditions imply that the soluble fraction will provide a more accurate date. It is also used on some occasions to verify the présent/absence or degree of contamination présent from secondary organic acids. The sample was first pretreated with acid to remove any
RAP03274.pdf (TREMBLAY (35). Boug, église Saint-Martin : à la recherche des origines de l'église, 2e intervention. Rapport de diagnostic)