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RAP00565.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • . As in previous years there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered material, and the same conventions are hereby used to distinguish between them: fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five
  • or more fragments of building material) have been termed 'sites 1 ; fields in which one unit produced five or more sherds or fragments of building material, and two or more neighbouring units produced one to four, or two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds or fragments
  • , have been termed 'probable sites'; fields in which there were irregular concentrations of material not covered by the above catégories - for example, one unit with five or more sherds of the same period - have been termed 'possible sites'. (The minimum number of finds necessary
  • and in toto.) Of thèse concentrations, none produced predominantly Roman material although 4.8% produced s orne Roman material; 27.3% had predominantly médiéval, 38.5% predominantly post-medieval, and 8.6% more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medieval sherds
  • acing slopes. Upland concentrations were less notable than in 1984 (transects H, J, K) with only a quarter lying between the 50m and 75m contours; more than half 1 ay between 25m and 50m (59.9%), as in the other Carentoir transects. Only 35.3% of sites 1 ay within 250m of streams
  • that are mapped, far less than in 1984, while a further 39% were up to 500m, and 25.6% more than 500m, away; it was largely sites in F that caused this anomaly. Comparison was systematical ly made with the early nineteenth-century pattern of land-use and settlement, as evidenced by the ancien
  • cadastre, as usual. More than three-quarters of the concentrations (80.2%) lay more than 100m away from early nineteenth-century settlements and only 7.5% lay within 50m of them. (This is not signif icantly différent from distances from modem settlements). Surface material tends
  • . In some parts cadastral land-use, naming and road patterns themselves indicate former settlement sites, especially where very small fields of very mi scell aneous^ land-use are arranged in relation to tracks, like the curti 1 agesand clos that surround settlements both now
  • and in the early 'nineteenth century (Astill and Davies 1982b: 21f, 31). Thèse cadastral suggestions coincided with fields that produced concentrations of surface material at the post-medieval 'site' C470 and, more arguably, the post-medieval 'probable site 1 C473, although no buildings were
  • were the subject of more intensive study: four fields (A107, D221, B216, B347) were gridded in 5m squares so that everything on the surface of the fields, including schiste, might be collected. A107 had been classified as a 'possible site', with comparable amounts of médiéval
  • unusually large, and their distribution, together with the nature of the assemblage, suggests that the field once contained a Roman-period structure. Médiéval and post-medieval pottery, by contrast, probably arrived as a resuit of manuring. B216 lies on a slight north-west si ope at 65m
  • . As with field 0221, this cl ustering was sufficiently pronounced (and sufficiently distinct from the distribution of médiéval and post-medieval pottery) to suggest that a Roman-period structure once stood on the field. Magnetic susceptibil ity readings produced unusually high values
  • , and rather more variation than did the other fields, with some tendency for lower readings in the area of the brick/tile/Roman cl ustering. A pl atf orm at the north-western edge of the field produced little material of any type; it is likely that this area has been ploughed down
  • , a concentration of médiéval pottery ('site') discovered in the course of transect walking in 1982. In 1983 a 'total' collection was organised over the same area, with geophysical and geochemical prospection. The results suggested that there was domestic occupation on some part of the field
  • conditions prevailed on another three. Excavation therefore had to be more limited than was intended. The excavation strategy was similar to that used by Martin Bell to sample lynchets and valley bottoms in the south of England (Bell 1977; 1983). A 2m-wide trench, 14m long, was eut across
  • practice. Since the two trenches showed différent amounts of soil buildup and material in the two areas, changes in manuring practice rather than lapse in cultivation may be more relevant in explaining the data from Trench 1. The land-use around Trench 2 clearly changed when
  • in the area. Samples were taken from Trench 1 and Trench 2; more will be taken during the summer; and micromorphological analysis will begin in September. The samples taken from 'total' collection sites in 1984 for phosphate analysis have ail been processed and a study was made
  • no, or next to no, material. As in 1984, even fields with inhabited structures in the early nineteenth century produced no more material than that sufficient to qualify as a 'possible site' (F212); and, as noted above, most of the high concentrations occurred more than 100m from présent
  • as coniferous) can hardly be more than two hundred years old. In such ways surface scatters, in association with other évidence, are beginning to suggest precisely localisable changes in land-use, especially during the 1 ast millenium. This year also saw a major attack on the problem
  • of the local schi stes. The problem is a simple one: because of outcrops and deep ploughing, fields more often than not have a surface scatter of freshly broken and/or abraded schi ste; schiste is also the most common building material in use in the study area between the seventeenth
RAP01768.pdf (le mésolithique en Bretagne. rapport de projet collectif de recherches)
RAP00568.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • the four communes named above, and sampling of fields in the surrounding communes, together with sélective geophysical and geochemical survey, and smal 1 excavations to test results; compl ementa.ry envi r onmental analysis is al so being undertaken . The fieldwalking programme
  • pottery (maximum 5 sherds per square) was more evenly spread. Smal 1 quanti ti es of brick and tile (maximum 0 .5kg per square) were uhevenl y distributed, but tended to concentrate in the south of the field, away from the cl Lister i ng of pre—médiéval and médiéval pottery
  • at the base of context 2, eut into what looked like a buried soil (32). AI 1 had si mi 1 ar fills of yel 1 owi sh-brown sandy loam with charcoal flecks. On the north side of the trench part of a large pit was excavated (3: lm wide, 0.42m deep > . It had a lower fi II with sliqhtly more
  • charcoal (16) and smail 1 fragments of mudstone; this produced two smal 1 and abraded sherds of Iron-Age pottery (Fabric 86); the upper fill (15) had no finds. Another pit was also found in the north section (22: lm wide, 0.42m deep) whose fill (23) had no finds but more mudstone
  • and smal 1 quantiti.es of post-medi eval pottery, but it is more difficLilt to explain the rather ni gh quanti ty and the concentration of médiéval pottery - thèse would be better expiai ned by référence to occupation context s or middens in that field. The difficulties of digging
  • without more extensive investigation. The séquence from T36 is important. The trench was sited on the highest part of the field, near the top of the slope, yet it has a much deeper stratification than T37 lower down the slope. The buried soil 32, with its charcoal, might represent
  • the stone in the plough soil of T36 included plenty of introduced building stone, which must have been carried more than 1 km to this spot; this stone, then, may in tact dérive from the collapse of some nearby structure of médiéval date (cf. H132 below). It is just possible
  • Roux) documented from eighteenth and fifteenth centuries respect! vel y , with a possible médiéval structure near T36 (see fig. 2). It is potentially of the highest significance for long—terni settlement history and would merit a much more extensive investigation. A92 (Ruffiac
  • material was obtained from T29 (as was reflected by the results D -f the total collection) but more Roman pottery was found. Time ran ont and the sites had to be backfilled at the point, when ditches were recognised (Asti 13. and Davies 1987, 118-21). In 1988 the excavation was resumed
  • , loosely compacted quart:-: pebble conglomerate and riverine gravel . The lower fill (17) had more stone (47.7kg) than the upper (16: 19.6kg): the différence may reflect two separate dumps of soil; the cleanness of the fillings, the comparât i vel y small number of finds and the lack
  • to that of 10. The finds, though more plentiful, were similar in range: 14 sherds of grey coarse ware jars, 4 sherds of ter ra-ni qra -type pottery, 6 sherds of Iron-Age fabric and two pièces of ceramic tile were found. There was another ditch (11) in the south of the trench, eut
  • into natural. The edges were not as clearly defined as ditch 5, and the profile was more irregular; a 2m length was excavated, which was 0.6m deep and 1.2m wide. Although it was parallel with 5, its filling (12) was much sandier and the range of finds was différent. Large quanti ties
  • dug parallel, 6.4m apart. Ditch 19, 1.75m wide and 0.6 m deep, had within its fill (20) two sherd s of late Iron- Age/ear 1 y Roman pottery (Fabric 13) and 6 small pièces of iron— working slag. The more northerly ditch, 2:4, had a primary silt (60) with no finds and then a loam
  • to have been a Spanish amphora; the upper fill (58) produced no finds. The eastern edge of the ditch had been eut into by a group of four pits. Pit 77 was dug first, and then three more -71, 73 and 75: none of the fills produced finds (76, 70, 72, 74). A mètre down slope
  • ) and then the stones laid on top (51) (fig. 6). This wall, like 7 and 41, had very large blocks of quartz, altered schi ste and conglomerate in its base, and had similar stone to 7 in its other 365kg, although it had more quartzite (7%), more Cambrian siltstone (27.) and 1 ess altered schi ste (22
RAP00566.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • y managed landscapes associated with pet i ts further investigation because such château;-: , also warrant areas tend more traces of earlier landscapes. to préserve Add i t i on al 1 in some parts cadastral land— use, naming and road suggest. former settlement sites (Asti 11 p
  • of man-made building mater i al were recovered frorn the transects; 6.47. of the pottery was Roman, 34.87. médiéval and 58.8?/;, post-medi evail » This is consi derabl y more brick and tile than recovered in each previous season, rather more Roman pottery and rather less médiéval. Ten
  • pottery, and the saine conventions are hereby used to distinguish between thems fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five or more fragments of building material) have been termed 'sites'; fields in which one
  • unit produced five or more sherds or fragments of building material, and two or more neighbouring units produced one to four, gr. two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds or fragments, have been termed 'probable sites'; fields in which there were irregular
  • concentrations of material not covered by the above catégories for example, one unit with five or more sherds of the same period •- have been termed 'possible sites'. (The minimum number of finds necessary to quai if y a concentration for comment has been del i beratel y fixed at a 1 ow level
  • ?/. more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medi eval sherds» 43.9% of concentrations had a prédominance of building material, at présent treated as undatable; the remainder had more than the necessary minimum of pottery and. building material» Thèse figures
  • and also zones that tend to produce more or less of a surface scatter» Surface material is usually markedly absent from areas near the commune boundaries and is also difficult to find in the fields to the north of Qui 1 vain and around Le? Bois Faux; si gni f i cant 1 y , the more
  • the ancien cadastre , as usua 1 . More than three-quarters of concentrations of pottery (76.7V.) 1 ay more than 100m away from early n i net eenth-century settlements and only 12» 5% 1 ay within 50m of them» (The former is only slightly higher than distances from modem settlements
  • of the? sites 1 ay within 250m of mapped streams (427.) , while more than a quarter (31.57.) were more than 500m away from them. £< . Samplinq ou.tside the core transects Sampling outside the core was organisée) in 2km radiating from it and thèse were walked in the s ame way as in one
  • and their property less dispersed, with more cattle and altogether a more wealthy air; and, despite récent in the core. remembrement , fewer remembrement mounds than Transect M, running slightly south 01 east from the south~-e?ast corner of Carentoir, was bequn, but most of it remains 209 fields
  • -medi eval , and 11.87. more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medi eval sherds. 13.77 had a. prédominance of building material and the rest had more than the necessary minimum of building material and pottery. Despite the changes in topography and land
  • the surface. However, the distribution pattern of material does not si gni f i cant 1 y deviate from that found in the core. There are again areas with little or no material 'blank ' zones - and areas with more or less of a surface scatter. So, material tends to concentrate in the La
  • of local naturals and there are consequently far more fields with a mixture of black and pink/purple roofing schi stes , often with a prédominance of the pink. However, there were still zones that could be di st i ngui shed s black roofing schi stes overwhel mi ngl y predomi nated
  • in the core, and more are on south- (32.7), north(18.47.) and west--facing (12.27.) slopes - again reflecting the h i g h er t op og r ap h y „ Excavations. Al 16 Excavation was designed to sample the medieva\l settlement. of Al 16, located by fieldwalking and classified as a "site
  • in the ancien cadastre, but the lack of a return to the wall, and the petering ont of the hardstanding, argues against them being part of the actual structures a boundary wall and yard are more likely. It is unfortunate that neither produced dating évidence. The pit in T10 is important
  • médiéval pottery to the rier t h classify the two fields as a 'site'. In March 1986 intensive surface collection was rnade from most of the two fields. The distribution of médiéval and post-medi eval pottery on K446 was of a 1 ow and even density, although there appeared to be more
  • material lower down the si ope. The collection also produced smal 1 and sporadic amounts of Iron Age pottery (no more than three sherds in any five-metre square). Although road changes make corrélation difficult, it seems that a t. t h e ti me o f the ancien cadastre K 446 was part
  • of an arable lave been field, close to two small curtilages, which may abandoned earlier house plots. (The cadastral plan of Becul eu as a whole shows a great nurnber of thèse empty curtilages and suggests that the settlement of Becul eu had once been considerably larger.) The possible
  • by a métal led road, is particularly interesting. It demonstrates that the routes into Becul eu have changed. More importantly, the pottery from the holloway and associated ditch gives an indication that the earlier route was in use in the médiéval period» Thin section analysis of the si
  • ; field names (landes and f ri ches) over the whole area indicate that it had not been characteri st i cal 1 y cultivated before the 1820s. The field was first wal ked in 1984 and was classified as a 'possible site' (médiéval). In April 1986 it was intensively wal ked and this produced
RAP03967 (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil à Quiberon. Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de fouille programmée 2020 )
RAP01557.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport final de synthèse de fouille programmée 1996-1998)
  • F495 ,0 Tranchée 27 5 Metres ZD Site Name..L«...): Pnni Reauciion..; fto. copies. ...1.... Fig. 18. Le Yaudet. Tranchées 27. Coupes. t/3 a. 3 O •U (N
RAP03654 (PLOUGASTEL-DAOULAS (29). Le Rocher de l'Impératrice. Rapport intermédiaire 2018 de FP 2017-2019)
  • plus ou moins rapides et de différentes ampleurs aux conséquences parfois marquées sur les environnements animal et végétal. Parallèlement, les sociétés humaines connaissent d’importantes mutations techno-économiques et sociales. Ce sont ces dynamiques, faites de ruptures, de
RAP03345.pdf (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil : Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de FP)
RAP03364.pdf (PLOUGASTEL-DAOULAS (29). Le Rocher de l'Impératrice. Rapport de FP 2014-2016)
  • of a succession of short occupations by small groups of hunter-gatherers. These occupations seem to have been essentially dedicated to hunting activities. These hunters probably came with tool kits constituted of domestic tools made of long blades, and cores at different stages of reduction
  • , development of a weaponry essentially constituted of axial points). More than 50 engraved schist tablets were also discovered at the Rocher de l’Impératrice. This discovery is particularly interesting since it constitutes the first evidence of Paleolithic art in Brittany. These engraving
  • and rhythm of the transformation of the last Paleolithic communities. There is no doubt that the next plurennial program (2017-2019) will participate to bring much more data with the extension of the excavation to the totality of the surface preserved on the site. 11 Rocher de
  • entrecoupée de plusieurs périodes de refroidissement plus ou moins rapides et de différentes ampleurs aux conséquences parfois marquées sur les environnements animal et végétal. Parallèlement, les sociétés humaines connaissent d’importantes mutations techno-économiques et sociales. Ce sont
RAP00567.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered pottery, and the usual conventions are hereby used to distinguish between them: fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five or more fragments
  • of building material) have been termed 'sites'; fields in which one unit produced five or more sherds or fragments of building material, and two or more neighbouring units produced one to four, or. two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds or fragments, have been termed
  • 'probable sites'; fields in which there were irregular concentrations of material not covered by the above catégories - for example, one unit with five or more sherds of the same period - have been termed 'possible sites'. (It should be stressed, yet again, that the terme are conventions
  • predomi nanti y médiéval or predomi nanti y post-medi eval sherds, others more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medi eval sherds, and others had a prédominance of man-made building material. The proportions of such concentrations are as follows, by transect
  • scatter with Roman material lies near the bourg of Comblessac and not on some distant periphery, as is more usual . In Transect M there were 'blank' areas on the banks of the River Aff and its tributaries but most notable was a very marked and very large 'blank' zone in the commune
  • of Pipriac was interesting. Some small plots beside houses in the town contained more médiéval material than post-med i eval . Near Pipriac, although some médiéval fabrics were recovered, post-medi eval sherds were far more notable. The distribution of material in gênerai reflects
  • there are finds from the Rance/ Vi 1 ai ne river Systems and one sherd from Pipriac is already known (Galliou 1977: 91-2). The médiéval fabrics from this eastern région seem to have less mica, fewer spi cul es and more grog. Some of the fields with Roman material are of particular interest
RAP00129.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport de sondage et de prospection-inventaire.)
RAP02703.pdf (CRÉHEN (22). château du Guildo. fouille programmée triennale 2011-2013. rapport intermédiaire de fp)
  • la communication, notamment en raison de la mise en œuvre de l’exposition « soyons fouilles » dont la période du bas moyen-âge est armée autour de la fouille du Guildo. Des animations et une conférence ont également été proposées, dans le cadre des journées européennes du
  • ) en août-septembre 2010. Ces deux publications sont également attendues pour 2012. Figure 4 : animation sur le thème de la construction au moyen-âge organisée dans le cadre des journées européennes du patrimoine (Cliché L. Beuchet/Inrap) 4 Le château du Guildo, rapport
  • , type 23 (1re effigie) - 1642 N° v18_1421 Mint name : Charleville Diameter in mm : 19 mm Die axis : 12 h. Metal : Cuivre Actual weight : 2,29 g. Current for : 2 d.t. Click on the picture to enlarge. Legend : (rose) CHA[R]LES. II. DVC. D. MANT. S. DAR, (légende commençant à 7
  • to enlarge. Mint name : Paris, Moulin des Étuves Mint mark : A Location of the mint mark : A dans la légende du droit à 6 heures Mintage : 1347001 exemplaires Diameter in mm : 20,5 mm Die axis : 6 h. Metal : Cuivre Actual weight : 2,81 g. Legal weight : 3,136 g. Pieces to the mark : 1/78
RAP02357.pdf (SAINT-MARCEL (56). "la Sente Verte". le bourg. rapport final d'opération de fouille préventive)
RAP03801 (Corpus des signes gravés néolithiques, Art rupestre néolithique en Armorique. Rapport PCR.)
  • animation 3D, en accès libre). 21 Corpus des signes gravés – 2019 1.4. Objets Le projet d’une base de données sous le logiciel libre Arches était envisagé en 2016, mais nous hésitons à franchir le pas dans l’attente d’une discussion ouverte avec nos collègues de l’Ecole Centrale
RAP02227.pdf (LA ROCHE-MAURICE (29). château de roc'h morvan. rapport de fp1)