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RAP03967 (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil à Quiberon. Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de fouille programmée 2020 )
  • ont été faits depuis 2019 sur les mammifères et les plantes dans le but de tester et d’adapter les différentes méthodes existantes. Ce type d’analyse reste exploratoire en contexte d’amas coquillier et à ce titre le site de Beg-er-Vil est pilote. L’acquisition des données reste
  • internationaux (Meso'2020 Dixième congrès international sur le Mésolithique en Europe. 7-11 septembre 2020, Toulouse / Investigate the shore, sounding the past: methods and practices of maritime prehistory. Séance de la Société préhistorique française, décembre 2020. Brest). Ils permettent de
RAP00568.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • was probably used for agricultural purposes in the Roman period and hence that the distribution of Roman pottery on the surface derived from manuring. However, the concentrations of brick and tile found in 'total' collection cannot be expiai ned in this way, since the material occurs
  • . The square T36 was excavated in the same way as H 145 and A92 in 1986: a 5% sample was taken for sieving to check recovery rates and l'iand tools were used (Asti 11 and Davies, 1987). The excavation took 85 working days, with a team of five. Trench 36 The plough soi 1 (1) was excavated
  • ) of introduced stone pink siltstone (K-01M) , Brioverian shale (B2-3) , sandstone (02) and many lumps of fine black siltstone (03-4), of a quality often used for roofing, material which occurs natural ]y about lkm, away (58kg, 317. of stone excavated ) . A layer of yel 1 owi sh-brown sandy
  • of ceramic roof tile were recovered (43.88kg, 167 fragments), and the pottery consisted of 3 sherds of grey coarse ware and one sherd of central Gaul ish Samian. The absence of Ir on-Age f abri es and terra-ni qra-type pottery «and the présence of so much roofing material would suggest
  • that this phase of agricultural land-use lasted for some time without fresh sherds being added; indeed, at least. two ditches were reçut. There is, however, one ditch R (64) and its reçut (3) that do not fit this pattern for they were larger and were dug at right angles to the other
  • quantities of tile in most of the ditches therefore suggests that tile was dumped on A31/79 after the f i el ds/encl osures (and associated buildings from which the material may have been derived) had gone ont of use. The amounts of brick and tile were not, however, very great
  • (with both strap and rod handles) were made in Fabric 1, and there is clear indication of internai glazing. This discovery goes a long way towards explaining the apparent dearth of table wares in the material recovered from f i el dwal k i ng . Fine wares were however represented: Fabric
  • ditch, whose function was not precisely established, followed by an other ditch and post holes relating to a timber phase of construction (one? of which was packed with black roofing slate (03-4)), followed by a phase of agricultural use. After this came three walls, two (7, 41
  • ) belonging to a substantiel building with massive foundation material, a building which included a hearth at an early phase of use and which later had a substantiel extension (51) attached and a séries of floor levellings; the rël ati onshi p of the other, and much 1 ess substantiel, wall
  • 9/17 to this building is not clear. After this the structures were démoli shed and roofing material was dumped on the site. Then or later f reshl y broken pottery was thrown on to the area, which was presumably in use as a midden. Final ly, the dump was spread over the area
  • of the relationship between land-use and settlement during the 1 ast two thousand years, took place from 25 August - 1 October in the communes of Ruffiac, Tréal , St-Ni col as-du-Tertre and Carentoir, in the department of Morbihan in eastern Brittany. The ai m of the study is to détermine when
  • five-day planning trips by two in September 1987 and April 1988. The team, consisting of volunteers from a wide range of places, numbered twenty-six, including the directors, one finds assistant and three supervisors; it worked for f i ve weeks from 28 August, with four days off
  • is a good indicator of settlement in the near vicinity. In the case of the test pit T37 prehistoric pottery was recovered from the surface, but there were no sub-surface features of that date. It is impossible to suggest reasons for the soning of the prehistoric material on the surface
  • an agr i cul tural phase at a time when the topography of the field was not so pronounced. The pits eut into this layer represent a change in land-use and presumably indicate the présence of a nearby Iron-Age settlement. The clean and pottery-free fills would argue against use
  • for rubbish; they may have been dug to obtain clay or stone. The small quantities of 5" locally obtained mudstone in some pits could represent some residual trace of stone-wor ki ng , given that the spindle whorl was o-f the same material. At some later phase in the Iron Age the area
  • was used as a dump , such that a ridge or mound was -formed (context 2); the trench opened (T36) was too small to establish the character o-f this dump, but it indicates the continued existence of a nearby settlement. The sise of the dump, and the character and relatively small amount
  • Df the material in it, do not however suggest a midden but rather collapsed walls or some sort of bank. The absence of Roman material from the dump suggests that it was formed before the Roman period: the few Roman sherds found in the topsoil could have been derived from a very
  • Roman site in the vicinity, and a few sherds in the topsoil, there is no trace of Roman settlement on this field and little to suggest Roman agricultural use. Présent évidence might suggest that the médiéval pottery in the plough soil derived from very heavy manuring, although
  • was not présent in such quanti ti es. Although the area excavated was so small, it is sufficient to reveal that this zone is of exceptional importance as a long-used settlement area - Iron Age, Roman nearby to the south east, two seigneurial sites hardby (Le Bois Guillaume and La Touche au
  • material was obtained from T29 (as was reflected by the results D -f the total collection) but more Roman pottery was found. Time ran ont and the sites had to be backfilled at the point, when ditches were recognised (Asti 13. and Davies 1987, 118-21). In 1988 the excavation was resumed
RAP00566.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • pottery, and the saine conventions are hereby used to distinguish between thems fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five or more fragments of building material) have been termed 'sites'; fields in which one
  • , 67. table wares of fabrics 5 and 6, and 47. storage vessels of fabric S. Most of T4 was dug by hand in a similar way to T3 , but in the later stages a machine was used to remove some of the colluvium. Two im-wide trenches were also eut by machine. One (T5) , 22m long, extended
  • , means that this kind of feature can only be detected by excavation, because even the deepest ploughing is unlikely to bring material to the surface, even assuming the laxnd is cultivable» This may be one reason for the dearth of prehistoric material recovered in the core communes
  • as used on Ai 16. A 6m square was sited over one of the slight pottery concentrations located by intensive surface collection. The plough soi 1 was removed by pick and shovel but 57. of the square was reserved for sieving, to act as a control over recovery rates of material
  • for the main season by two people. The team (consisting largely of past and présent students from the Universities of London, Reading, Durham and Sheffield) numbered twenty, including the directors, and worked for twelve days, from 23 March, with one day off. A smal 1 team, of the directors
  • unit produced five or more sherds or fragments of building material, and two or more neighbouring units produced one to four, gr. two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds or fragments, have been termed 'probable sites'; fields in which there were irregular
  • concentrations of material not covered by the above catégories for example, one unit with five or more sherds of the same period •- have been termed 'possible sites'. (The minimum number of finds necessary to quai if y a concentration for comment has been del i beratel y fixed at a 1 ow level
  • near the northern boundary of Transect D (a Roman road) and in the nei ghbourhood of Marsac , La Ruaudaie and La Roche Pèlerin» Analysis of the spatial distribution of imported local schi stes » parti cul arl y those used for roofing material s in the area, produces some equally
  • material; field E230, where there was also a large tile scatter, provided a parti cul arl y good example of this. Comparison of the distribution of surface material was made with the early n i neteenth-cent ur y p atterri of 1 and -use and settlement, as e v i d e n c e cl b y
  • of the? sites 1 ay within 250m of mapped streams (427.) , while more than a quarter (31.57.) were more than 500m away from them. £< . Samplinq ou.tside the core transects Sampling outside the core was organisée) in 2km radiating from it and thèse were walked in the s ame way as in one
  • % médiéval and 68% post-medi eval 5 six worked flints were? collected. One possible platform, a mound and ten lynchets were also noted. In accordance with the usual conventions, concentrations of surface material (total 51) may b e c 1 a s s i f i e d as f o 1 1 o w s r, Si tes ' ' Pr
  • , are still in use?» Concentrations of material in N tend to be on higher land (ail over 50m and 58,27» over 75m), reflecting the generally higher topography, and tend to be cl oser to streams (517. within 250m of a mapped stream) . Fewer sites are on flat land (14.37.) than is gênerai
  • the first trench was placed over one of the 'concentrations' of Iron Age pottery. Initial ly ai 6m square (T15) was excavated as at Al 16, A92 and H145, and then five trenches (1 mètre wide) were eut north-south across the field at 30m intervais using a machine (from west to east. T16/17
  • intervais, using collection units of 100m; field EAST BRITTANY SURVEY 1986 | TRANSECT J TRANSECT B "t— TRANSECT D TRANSECT A TRANSECT E -h— .y. : 75 m ■ ci3 " S Y •m .o-v. Tréal Lo 50ml—' O O .... □ ; C? (Rutfiac g SO TRANSECT G l'ï «2. cm. fl\ □ 1-5km apart
  • ... • • . J. I sites sites f N./< commune médiéval \ boundories sites post médiéval i undated sites 500m 0 sites TRANSECT M I A3 conditions, f eatures, présence of varieti£?s of schiste and local pronunci at i ons were noted on standardised recording forms. 285 fields were
  • worked flints were also collected, three from transect E, three from B, two from B and one from D. One possible platform and thirty lynchets were noted, of which fifteen were in Transect D. As in previous years there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered
  • s 10 (3.5) 24 (8.4) 23 (8.1) 57 (207.) 285 per transect and in tôt o. ) Of thèse concentrations, none produced predomi nantly Roman material although 17.57» produced some Roman material;; 12.37. had predomi nanti y médiéval, 22.87. predomi nant 1 y post-medi eval , and 8.8
  • ?/. more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medi eval sherds» 43.9% of concentrations had a prédominance of building material, at présent treated as undatable; the remainder had more than the necessary minimum of pottery and. building material» Thèse figures
  • again stress the large quanti ti es of brick and tile, relatively large of Roman and smal 1 of médiéval pottery» The spatial distribution of this material i s as interesting as in previous years, and broadly consistent with it» There are 'blank' zones within the four communes
  • and also zones that tend to produce more or less of a surface scatter» Surface material is usually markedly absent from areas near the commune boundaries and is also difficult to find in the fields to the north of Qui 1 vain and around Le? Bois Faux; si gni f i cant 1 y , the more
RAP03345.pdf (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil : Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de FP)
  • . Vous pouvez également être confrontés à des remplissages et déblais de fosses, toujours complexes à détecter à leur niveau d’ouverture, mais aussi à foyers ou à des vidanges de foyer. L’objectif est de fouiller indépendamment chacune de ces unités stratigraphiques (US), puis de les
  • site. Cette configuration apparait comme idéale, car elle permet une grande souplesse dans l’organisation de la fouille, tout en assurant la correction des données rapidement. 3. La fouille est réalisée par passes successives au sein des différentes US, avec un tamisage à sec puis à
RAP00567.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • further. This is not the place -For comprehensi ve considération o -F contrasts between the core communes and the transects sampling the surrounding area o-F the Oust/Vilaine watershed. However , it may be useful to make one or two observations about the material, prior to sustained
  • within thèse transects were walked at 50m intervais, using collection units of 100m; some were too sodden for effective and damage-free surface collection. Field conditions, features, présence of varieties of schi ste and local pronunci at i ons were noted on standardi sed recording
  • of building material) have been termed 'sites'; fields in which one unit produced five or more sherds or fragments of building material, and two or more neighbouring units produced one to four, or. two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds or fragments, have been termed
  • 'probable sites'; fields in which there were irregular concentrations of material not covered by the above catégories - for example, one unit with five or more sherds of the same period - have been termed 'possible sites'. (It should be stressed, yet again, that the terme are conventions
  • used locally for building, especially roofing, materials was also recorded for each field (though not collected). Thèse materials were not carried for long distances (10—20km maximum) but can usually be clearly di st i ngui shed from local natural , and o-f ten have nail holes
  • north east to Comblessac, as also north from Comblessac to the Lande de Craon. The pattern of occurrences of the schi stes in thèse transects suggests that the pink schi stes . i.e. material from the Guer quarries, may wel 1 have been the earliest to be used in the roofing industry
  • there are finds from the Rance/ Vi 1 ai ne river Systems and one sherd from Pipriac is already known (Galliou 1977: 91-2). The médiéval fabrics from this eastern région seem to have less mica, fewer spi cul es and more grog. Some of the fields with Roman material are of particular interest
  • EAST BRITTANY SURVEY 1987 PU EAST BRITTANY SURVEY - OUST/VILAINE WATERSHED EASTER 1987 The seventh season in a programme of fieldwork, itself part of a larger, mul ti -di sci pl i nary study of the relationship between 1 and-use and settlement during the last two thousand
  • landscape
  • , Reading, Cardiff and York) numbered twenty-two, ' including the directors, and worked for twel ve deiys, from 22 March, with one day off. Six people went in advance, and worked for one day beforehand. Overall, 330 mandays were spent on this year ' s season, including travelling time
  • ) Sampling was organized in three 2km transects radiating from the core (P, M and R) and thèse were wal ked in the same way as Transects A to L within the core and Transect N outside it, in 1982-6. Transect P ran due west to the River Oust for 4.1km from the western boundary of Ruffiac
  • (see fig. 1). M was in 1986, and six fields walked then: the alignment transect was slightly changed in 1987 to ensure coverage of a cross-section of land-use types Carentoir and the Vilaine. to the started of this adéquate between Sui table fields under plough and with young crop
  • (752 ha.), and 14.67. of the portion of Transect R walked (197 ha.): see fig. 2. Two sets of cropmarks, one platform and two areas of ridge and furrow were noted in M, together with forty-one lynchets; four and three lynchets, respect i vel y , were noted in P and R. 32.82kg
  • of pottery, 161.72kg of man-made building material, 23 from thèse flints and 611.72g of haematite were recovered transects , together with two worked pièces of quartz (from M). This breaks down, by transect, as follows: Brick/tile kg 18. 49 P M 121 . 77 21 . 46 R Pre-Rom. Pottery 1 . 47
  • . 0. 767. 1 . 37. Table 1: Roman Medi eval Post -med . Wei ght Fl int Haemati te by no. kg Pot Pot Pot g 2. 72 1 3. 67 34 . 67. 61 . 17. 2. 97. 545 18 26. 01 347. 61. 57. 3 . 87. 64 4 86. 87. 3. 13 3.77. 8.27. proportions and quantities of material recorded As in the core
  • there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered pottery, and the usual conventions are hereby used to distinguish between them: fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five or more fragments
  • for di sti ngui shi ng between greater and lesser concentrations and for providing a means of référence to them; they do not necessarily dénote the location of former settl ements. ) In accordance with the conventions, the concentrations of surface material (total 219) may
  • .) 219 (25.57.) 858 Table 2: concentrations of surface material (percentage of fields walked per transect and in toto) Of thèse concentrations none had predomi nanti y Roman or prehistoric pottery but a small proportion had some Roman or pre-Roman sherds. Some concentrations had
  • predomi nanti y médiéval or predomi nanti y post-medi eval sherds, others more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medi eval sherds, and others had a prédominance of man-made building material. The proportions of such concentrations are as follows, by transect
  • of surface scatters Di scussi on Clearly the character of the surface material differs from transect to transect. Transects P and M had areas which produced a little pre-Roman pottery - as had Transect N - a phenomenon that is extremely rare in the core communes (Asti 11 and Davies 1986
RAP00565.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • of the local schi stes. The problem is a simple one: because of outcrops and deep ploughing, fields more often than not have a surface scatter of freshly broken and/or abraded schi ste; schiste is also the most common building material in use in the study area between the seventeenth
  • ; the main team (consisting largely of past and présent students from the Universities of London and Reading) numbered twenty-two, including the directors; it worked for twel ve days, from 24 March, and had one day off; nine people (including one director) remained for an additional week
  • . As in previous years there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered material, and the same conventions are hereby used to distinguish between them: fields in which more than two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds of the same broad period (or five
  • or more fragments of building material) have been termed 'sites 1 ; fields in which one unit produced five or more sherds or fragments of building material, and two or more neighbouring units produced one to four, or two neighbouring units each produced five or more sherds or fragments
  • , have been termed 'probable sites'; fields in which there were irregular concentrations of material not covered by the above catégories - for example, one unit with five or more sherds of the same period - have been termed 'possible sites'. (The minimum number of finds necessary
  • tests suggested that thèse were only useful if taken at much narrower intervais. Schiste was collected, totally from A107, D221 and B216, and in a limited sample from B347 (from one square in every nine). This was subsequently classified in three colour catégories (black/grey, green
  • usters of other classes of material. 5 Excavations (EBS85 Tl and T2) Small -scale excavation of earthworks was undertaken in order to begin investigation of the soils and archaeology within field boundaries near sites identified in fieldwalking. As indicated previously, one
  • useful information. After three days préparation, excavation took place over eight days with a team of nine people, making a total of 52 working days. The weather during this period was appalling, with torrential rain and high winds: one complète day was lost and extremely difficult
  • practice. Since the two trenches showed différent amounts of soil buildup and material in the two areas, changes in manuring practice rather than lapse in cultivation may be more relevant in explaining the data from Trench 1. The land-use around Trench 2 clearly changed when
  • at the side of the field and not beyond; at the petit château of Gre'e Orlain there were fields that were 'blank' a short distance between inhabited buildings and 'probable sites'. Of course, it is not merely past settlement that is of interest but past land-use too. As demonstrated
  • by the 'total' collection sites of D221 and B347, even one field can produce distribution patterns that differ by period; the cl ustering of one class of material can suggest structures, the lack of cl ustering of another can suggest the effects of manuring. Comparison with cadastral land
  • as coniferous) can hardly be more than two hundred years old. In such ways surface scatters, in association with other évidence, are beginning to suggest precisely localisable changes in land-use, especially during the 1 ast millenium. This year also saw a major attack on the problem
  • surface collections (principally during May 1985). This is sufficient to make it clear that a proportion of the commonly occurring surface material on our fields is imported - from good quai ity modem si ate to harder schi stes, both used largely for roofing but also within the mud si
  • into cultivation. Potentially; then, this is an excepti onal ly important source of information about land-use in the pre-cadastral period. As for the local schi stes that form the bulk of walling materials, although it i_s_ possible to distinguish thèse by eye in the field and even localise
  • EAST BRITTANY SURVEY: QUST-VILAINE UATERSHED REPORT ON FIELDWORK IN MARCH-APRIL 1985 The fourth season in a programme of fieldwork, itself part of a larger, multi-discipl inary study of the rel ati onshi p between land-use and seulement during the last two thousand years, took
  • , and one spent three days taking soil samples for analysis at the Institut National Agronomique Pari s-Grignon . The weather varied between bad and appalling for much of the three weeks, with plenty of rainfall , but the crop was not high and fields were often in idéal condition
  • covered, ail fields under plough and with young crop within the three transects were walked at 50m 1 intervais, using collection units of 100m; field conditions, features, présence of schi ste and local pronunci ations were noted on standardised recording forms. 463 fields were thus
  • covered, encompassing 772 hectares (4.01% of the surface area of the four communes). 30.99kg of pottery and 93.92kg of man-made building material were recovered from the transects; 45% of the pottery was médiéval, 53.6% post-medieval and 1.4% Roman. No pre-Roman pottery was found
  • and in toto.) Of thèse concentrations, none produced predominantly Roman material although 4.8% produced s orne Roman material; 27.3% had predominantly médiéval, 38.5% predominantly post-medieval, and 8.6% more than the necessary minimum proportions of médiéval and post-medieval sherds
  • . The remaining concentrations (25.7%) had a prédominance of building material, at présent treated as undatable. 2 As usual , the topographical position of the sites was analysed. About a third of them (29.4%) were on flat 1 and while 17.1% were on south-facing and 16.6% on south-east-f
RAP03240.pdf (PLOUEZOC'H (29). Grand cairn de Barnenez : nouvelles approches, nouveaux résultats, nouvelles perspectives. Rapport de FP 2015)
  • : Long monument de Barnenez en Plouézoc’h, in Ses- Mounds and Megalithic Origins in Western sion B27 Uispp: Megalithic Biographies: Cycles France: Recent Excavations at Prissé-la- Of Use And Closure, Charrière., Proceedings of the Prehistoric Socie- Laporte L., Joussaume R
RAP01768.pdf (le mésolithique en Bretagne. rapport de projet collectif de recherches)
RAP03801 (Corpus des signes gravés néolithiques, Art rupestre néolithique en Armorique. Rapport PCR.)
RAP03942 (TREMUSON (22). La Colignère (tranche 2). L'occupation du plateau de Trémuson, de l'âge du Bronze au manoir de la Morandais. Rapport de fouille)
  • photos 228 Inventaire des US 250 Inventaire du mobilier céramique protohistorique 251 Inventaire du macro-outillage 252 Inventaire du mobilier céramique médiéval et moderne 261 Inventaire du métal 263 Inventaire du verre 264 Inventaire des prélèvements Annexes 268
RAP03176 (LA MÉZIÈRE (35). ZAC des Lignes de la Gonzée : fenêtre ouverte sur un terroir, du Néolithique à nos jours. Rapport de fouille)
  • 4235 (Cal BP 6185) Cal BC 4260 to 4230 (Cal BP 6210 to 6180) Cal BC 4195 to 4175 (Cal BP 6145 to 6125) 5360 ± 30 BP CHARRED MATERIAL 5450 5425 Radiocarbon age (BP) 8 5400 5375 5350 5325 5300 5275 5250 4350 4300 4250 4200 4150 4100 4050 Cal BC Database used INTCAL13
  • /29/2014 Sample Data Measured Radiocarbon Age 13C/12C Ratio Beta - 371577 3530 +/- 30 BP -25.5 o/oo SAMPLE : 049CER054 ANALYSIS : AMS-Standard delivery MATERIAL/PRETREATMENT : (food residue): acid/alkali/acid 2 SIGMA CALIBRATION : Cal BC 1930 to 1750 (Cal BP 3880 to 3700
  • : Datations radiocarbone – Laboratoire Beta Analytic Mr. Stephane Blanchet Report Date: 5/11/2015 INRAP Material Received: 5/1/2015 Sample Data Measured Radiocarbon Age Beta - 409904 5380 +/- 30 BP SAMPLE : ZLG S3229/2 LA MEZIERE ANALYSIS : AMS-Standard delivery MATERIAL/PRETREATMENT
  • : (charred material): acid/alkali/acid d13C -26.0 o/oo Conventional Radiocarbon Age(*) 5360 +/- 30 BP 2 SIGMA CALIBRATION : Cal BC 4325 to 4285 (Cal BP 6275 to 6235) and Cal BC 4265 to 4220 (Cal BP 6215 to 6170) and Cal BC 4210 to 4155 (Cal BP 6160 to 6105) and Cal BC 4130 to 4065
  • (Cal BP 6080 to 6015) ____________________________________________________________________________________ Beta - 409905 5200 +/- 30 BP SAMPLE : ZLG S404/2 LA MEZIERE ANALYSIS : AMS-Standard delivery MATERIAL/PRETREATMENT : (charred material): acid/alkali/acid -23.3 o/oo 5230
  • References Mathematics used for calibration scenario A Simplified Approach to Calibrating C14 Dates, Talma, A. S., Vogel, J. C., 1993, Radiocarbon 35(2):317-322 References to INTCAL13 database Reimer PJ et al. IntCal13 and Marine13 radiocarbon age calibration curves 0– 50,000 years
  •   to 4135 (Cal BP 6095 to 6085) Cal BC 4055  to 3970 (Cal BP 6005 to 5920) Cal BC 4040 (Cal BP 5990) Cal BC 4015 (Cal BP 5965) Cal BC 4000 (Cal BP 5950) Cal BC 4045 to 3985 (Cal BP 5995 to 5935) 5230 ± 30 BP CHARRED MATERIAL 5325 Radiocarbon age (BP) 5300 5275 5250 5225 5200 5175
  • 5150 5125 4250 4200 4150 4100 4050 4000 Cal BC Database used INTCAL13 References Mathematics used for calibration scenario A Simplified Approach to Calibrating C14 Dates, Talma, A. S., Vogel, J. C., 1993, Radiocarbon 35(2):317-322 References to INTCAL13 database Reimer
  • @radiocarbon.com Page 6 of 6 3950 10 Inrap · RFO de fouille La Mézière (Ille-et-Vilaine), ZAC Les Lignes de La Gonzée − Fenêtre ouverte sur un terroir, du Néolithique à nos jours Vol. 2 Mr. Stephane Blanchet Report Date: 6/12/2014 INRAP Material Received: 6/5/2014 Sample Data
  • Measured Radiocarbon Age 13C/12C Ratio Beta - 382323 1790 +/- 30 BP -21.8 o/oo SAMPLE : ZLG S5260 ANALYSIS : AMS-Standard delivery MATERIAL/PRETREATMENT : (charred material): acid/alkali/acid 2 SIGMA CALIBRATION : Cal AD 85 to 240 (Cal BP 1865 to 1710
  • % probability Intercept of radiocarbon age with calibration curve 1 Sigma calibrated results 68% probability 1950 Cal AD 85  to 240 (Cal BP 1865 to 1710) Cal AD 135 (Cal BP 1815) Cal AD 130 to 230 (Cal BP 1820 to 1720) 1840 ± 30 BP CHARRED MATERIAL 1925 Radiocarbon age (BP) 1900
  • 1875 1850 1825 1800 1775 1750 1725 50 75 100 125 150 175 200 225 250 Cal AD Database used INTCAL13 References Mathematics used for calibration scenario A Simplified Approach to Calibrating C14 Dates, Talma, A. S., Vogel, J. C., 1993, Radiocarbon 35(2):317-322
  • -0964 • Email: beta@radiocarbon.com Page 3 of 3 275 12 Inrap · RFO de fouille La Mézière (Ille-et-Vilaine), ZAC Les Lignes de La Gonzée − Fenêtre ouverte sur un terroir, du Néolithique à nos jours Vol. 2 Mr. Stephane Blanchet Report Date: 2/5/2014 INRAP Material Received: 1
  • ) ____________________________________________________________________________________ Conventional Radiocarbon Age(*) 3520 +/- 30 BP Beta - 371578 5360 +/- 30 BP -24.3 o/oo 5370 +/- 30 BP SAMPLE : ZLG S404 US2 ANALYSIS : AMS-Standard delivery MATERIAL/PRETREATMENT : (charred material): acid/alkali/acid 2 SIGMA CALIBRATION : Cal BC 4330 to 4280 (Cal BP 6280 to 6230) AND Cal
  • +/- 40 BP -23.5 o/oo 5260 +/- 40 BP SAMPLE : ZLG S428 US3 ANALYSIS : AMS-Standard delivery MATERIAL/PRETREATMENT : (charred material): acid/alkali/acid 2 SIGMA CALIBRATION : Cal BC 4230 to 4190 (Cal BP 6180 to 6140) AND Cal BC 4180 to 3970 (Cal BP 6130 to 5920
  • ) ____________________________________________________________________________________ Beta - 371580 5270 +/- 30 BP -25.1 o/oo 5270 +/- 30 BP SAMPLE : ZLG S442 US2 ANALYSIS : AMS-Standard delivery MATERIAL/PRETREATMENT : (charred material): acid/alkali/acid 2 SIGMA CALIBRATION : Cal BC 4230 to 4190 (Cal BP 6180 to 6140) AND Cal BC 4170 to 4030 (Cal BP 6120 to 5980
  • Age(*) Beta - 371581 5300 +/- 30 BP -26.7 o/oo 5270 +/- 30 BP SAMPLE : ZLG S445 US5 ANALYSIS : AMS-Standard delivery MATERIAL/PRETREATMENT : (charred material): acid/alkali/acid 2 SIGMA CALIBRATION : Cal BC 4230 to 4190 (Cal BP 6180 to 6140) AND Cal BC 4170 to 4030 (Cal BP 6120
  • to 5980) Cal BC 4030 to 3990 (Cal BP 5980 to 5940) ____________________________________________________________________________________ Beta - 371582 5260 +/- 30 BP -25.4 o/oo 5250 +/- 30 BP SAMPLE : ZLG S713 US1 ANALYSIS : AMS-Standard delivery MATERIAL/PRETREATMENT : (charred
  • material): acid/alkali/acid 2 SIGMA CALIBRATION : Cal BC 4220 to 4200 (Cal BP 6180 to 6150) AND Cal BC 4160 to 4130 (Cal BP 6110 to 6080) Cal BC 4110 to 4100 (Cal BP 6060 to 6050) AND Cal BC 4070 to 3980 (Cal BP 6020 to 5930
  • ) ____________________________________________________________________________________ Beta - 371583 5410 +/- 30 BP -26.3 o/oo 5390 +/- 30 BP SAMPLE : ZLG S1651 US2 ANALYSIS : AMS-Standard delivery MATERIAL/PRETREATMENT : (charred material): acid/alkali/acid 2 SIGMA CALIBRATION : Cal BC 4330 to 4230 (Cal BP 6280 to 6180) AND Cal BC 4190 to 4170 (Cal BP 6140 to 6120
RAP02603.pdf (PCR Brécilien. étude interdisciplinaire d'une forêt mythique. bilan d'activités 2010. projet collectif de recherches)
RAP03068.pdf (PLÉCHÂTEL (35). le bois : architecture et vie quotidienne au néolithique moyen. rapport de fouille)
  • Introduction 211 2.1.7.2 Les résultats carpologiques 211 2.1.7.2a Les prélèvements positifs et les densités en macrorestes végétaux 212 2.1.7.2b Les plantes cultivées 216 2.1.7.2c Les plantes sauvages 217 2.1.7.3 222 2.2 222 2.2.1 Le
  • . Résultats 35 ine ila aV ag ar on ée ll va l de val lé ed uS em no n ang Le Bois ruis s. d e l’Ét ru iss .d el aL an d ed eB colline Saint-Saturnin 0 Fig.3 Entités hydrographiques et topographiques environnant le site de Pléchâtel, Le Bois (d’après modèle
RAP03440 (SAINT-CARADEC (22). Bel-Air. Rapport de fouille)
RAP01557.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport final de synthèse de fouille programmée 1996-1998)
  • révélant bientôt. Devant le parement du rempart se voyait aussi la partie supérieure du rempart de type Fécamp de ptiase 3 (Us 344), accumulé devant la muraille de ptiase 2. La porte était, quant à elle, entièrement comblée d'un amas serré de dalles de granit, présentant généralement
  • des angles vifs (Us 345). Nous avons pu observer que, par endroits, ces pierres recouvraient le parement de la porte, ce qui prouve sans conteste que celui-ci n'était pas plus élevé au moment de ce comblement. Afin d'examiner l'état de conservation et la stabilité de ce passage
  • vers l'avant de ceux des blocs de parement qui avaient été conservés in situ. Cet effondrement eut pour conséquence de combler partiellement les niveaux inférieurs du passage de la porte d'un niveau de pierres (Us 347) qui, montrant en surface des traces de tassement et d'usure
  • , avait manifestement été exposée à l'air libre pendant un certain laps de temps. Par la suite, on reconstruisit le côté de ce passage en y entassant des dépôts de terre sableuse de couleur grise, grossièrement parementés de gros blocs de granit (Us 346). Ce niveau avait 1,1m
  • examinerons ciaprès les raisons de cette modification. Au-dessus de cette reconstruction, et comblant en partie le passage, se voyait une masse compacte de dalles de granit redéposées (Us 345), niveau qui nous livra une petite quantité de céramiques du Bas Empire romain. Fig. 5. Le
  • en évidence les horizons formant le rempart de phase 3, ici constitué d'un niveau de pierres à angles vifs (Us 291), sur lequel reposait une couche tassée d'arène granitique jaune (Us 290). Nous avons pu montrer que ce dépôt de sable passait par-dessus le parement externe du
  • reconnaître plus avant la nature de ce mur tardif au pied de la pente du rempart. Son parement est édifié sur un niveau de grosses pierres à angles vifs (Us 283), descendant en une pente abrupte vers le sud. Il est possible, sans que nous puissions le prouver que ces pierres proviennent du
  • la partie méridionale de la tranchée. La séquence stratigraphique la plus ancienne était constituée d'un sol mince (Us 355), contenant deux petits tessons de céramique protohistorique (Age du Bronze ?), que scellait une mince couche de sable redéposé et tassé (Us 354). Cet horizon
  • constitue le premier niveau associé à la construction du rempart F 446. Ce dernier est formé de grosses dalles de granit solidement liées par une matrice de sol sableux de couleur jaune (Us 351). Les rares tessons de poterie découverts dans cet ensemble sont tous de type pré-laténien
  • , mais de présentent pas de formes reconnaissables et datables. Une fine lentille de terre (Us 352), ainsi que la couche de terre sableuse de couleur jaune qui la recouvre (Us 377) appartiennent peut-être à la structure du rempart ou, ce qui est moins probable, résultent de l'érosion
  • de la zone située en avant de celui-ci. La coupe n'ayant pu être poussée jusqu'au sol naturel dans la totalité de la tranchée, nous ignorons l'épaisseur exacte de cette structure en pierres sèches. A l'extrémité nord de la tranchée, une couche de terre (Us 295) passant pardessus
  • cette structure, a livré quelques tessons de La Tène Finale. Ce niveau était recouvert par une couche de dalles de granit à angles vifs (Us 294), correspondant sans doute à la couche de pierres associée au rempart de phase 2 Etant donné cette séquence stratigraphique, il nous paraît
  • probable que la structure de pierres sèches que nous venons de décrire (Us 351/F 446) soit un ouvrage défensif antérieur aux fortifications de La Tène Finale. Si l'on examine les courbes de niveau de cette zone, on voit que cet ouvrage s'achève à un mètre ou deux du bord occidental de
  • . La première structure rencontrée fut une plate-forme, à la surface quasihorizontale, bâtie au nord d'un gros rocher de granit. Cette plate-forme est formée de grandes dalles de granit d'origine marine, déposées à plat et mêlées d'un sol gris (Us 363). Selon toute probabilité
  • impossible que la plate-fonne décrite ci-dessus (Us 363) ait servi à consolider le sol avant l'érection d'une telle structure, mais nous ne pouvons pour l'instant le prouver avec certitude. Le rempart 2 est formé d'une masse considérable de pierres (Us 361) adossée à un parement externe
  • vertical (F 490) bâti sur des dépôts de pierres et de sable. Le premier ensemble de pien-es déversées à cet effet (Us 361) est formé de grandes dalles de granit à angles vifs, les vides conséquents qui les séparent montrant que cette masse avait été déversée rapidement au cours d'une
  • d'éboulement. Elle nous a montré que les blocs non liés qui forment ce noyau à proximité du parement externe (Us 453) appartenaient à la même opération de construction que celui-ci, les pierres les plus proches du parement ayant été déposées obliquement afin d'assurer une plus grande
  • stabilité à l'ensemble. Plus en arrière, ce noyau était constitué de gros blocs, parfois longs de plus d'un mètre, qui avaient été empilés sans soin particulier. Ils étaient recouverts d'une couche de gros sable gris (Us 452), contenant des fragments de charbon de bois et des tessons de
  • poterie laténienne. Ces matériaux avaient été délibérément déversés sur cet amas de blocs et soigneusement tassés. Dans une zone limitée, à l'arrière du parement, se voyaient des dépôts de gros sable gris ou jaune (Us 461). Un niveau continu de gros blocs de granit, à angles vifs pour
  • la plupart, liés par de l'arène granitique contenant des pierres plus petites (Us 433) recouvrait cet ensemble. A proximité du parement, cet horizon était scellé par un niveau de sable fin de couleur jaune, d'origine loessique (Us 434), à la surface duquel reposait une autre