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RAP03240.pdf (PLOUEZOC'H (29). Grand cairn de Barnenez : nouvelles approches, nouveaux résultats, nouvelles perspectives. Rapport de FP 2015)
  • royale belge d’Anthropologie et de Préhistoire: 259276. Laporte L. 2010a: Innate and/or expressed identities: Their conceptualization through monumentality, funerary practices and grave goods? Some examples from the megalithic tradition of western France., Journal of Neolithic
  • occi- d’érosion sont présentes sur la face supérieure pri- dentale ne peut pas être estimée. Seule un dolmen vilégiant une extraction sur estran. Le volume don- a pu être observé, malheureusement son état ne né par le modèle 3D est de 2,65 m3 donnant un permet pas de savoir
RAP00567.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • and the western section of M). Some of the Roman fabrics in eastern ti had not been noted before, and included a late Roman roi 1 er-st amped sherd of Argonne ware from M447, near 'Château Gaillard', 2.5km east of Pipriac bourg ■ This ware has an essentially coastal distribution, although
  • there are finds from the Rance/ Vi 1 ai ne river Systems and one sherd from Pipriac is already known (Galliou 1977: 91-2). The médiéval fabrics from this eastern région seem to have less mica, fewer spi cul es and more grog. Some of the fields with Roman material are of particular interest
  • . Fieldwalking of the sample transects, as also total collection in the core, were 7 financed by the Leverhulme Trust, with some additional assistance from the University of London Central Research Fund and the University of Reading; archive work was financed by a grant from the British
  • years, took place from 20 March - 4 April in the communes surrounding Ruffiac, Treal , St-Ni col as-du-Tertre and Carentoir, in the departments of Morbihan and 1 1 1 e-et-Vi 1 ai ne in eastern Brittany. The aim of the study is to détermine when, how and why the exploitation
  • landscape
  • , Reading, Cardiff and York) numbered twenty-two, ' including the directors, and worked for twel ve deiys, from 22 March, with one day off. Six people went in advance, and worked for one day beforehand. Overall, 330 mandays were spent on this year ' s season, including travelling time
  • ) Sampling was organized in three 2km transects radiating from the core (P, M and R) and thèse were wal ked in the same way as Transects A to L within the core and Transect N outside it, in 1982-6. Transect P ran due west to the River Oust for 4.1km from the western boundary of Ruffiac
  • (from the area of La Sourigaie to La Houssaie), passing through the communes of Missiriac and Malestroit and the northern outskirts of the town of Malestroit; Transect R ran north east for 7.75km from Trelo to Le Mur at the north-east corner of Carentoir, passing through the communes
  • within thèse transects were walked at 50m intervais, using collection units of 100m; some were too sodden for effective and damage-free surface collection. Field conditions, features, présence of varieties of schi ste and local pronunci at i ons were noted on standardi sed recording
  • forms. Ail available fields in Transects P and M and those in Transect R for a distance of some 7.75km were covered. Hence, 858 fields were walked (72 in P, 640 in M and 146 in R) , encompassing 1044 hectares: 8.57. of the surface area of Transect P (95 ha.), 18.77. of Transect M
  • of pottery, 161.72kg of man-made building material, 23 from thèse flints and 611.72g of haematite were recovered transects , together with two worked pièces of quartz (from M). This breaks down, by transect, as follows: Brick/tile kg 18. 49 P M 121 . 77 21 . 46 R Pre-Rom. Pottery 1 . 47
  • .) 219 (25.57.) 858 Table 2: concentrations of surface material (percentage of fields walked per transect and in toto) Of thèse concentrations none had predomi nanti y Roman or prehistoric pottery but a small proportion had some Roman or pre-Roman sherds. Some concentrations had
  • : P M R Some Some pre—Rom. Roman 7 . 47. 11 . 17. 10. 67. 1 . 37. 6. 57. Table 3: Médiéval Post-medi eval 11. 17. 8. 17. 6 . 57. 48. 27. 32.57. 35. 5% Med. + Brick Post-med . 11.17. 18. 57. 3.87. 45.67. 51 . 57. Brick + pottery 11. 17. 107. 6 . 5 "
  • of surface scatters Di scussi on Clearly the character of the surface material differs from transect to transect. Transects P and M had areas which produced a little pre-Roman pottery - as had Transect N - a phenomenon that is extremely rare in the core communes (Asti 11 and Davies 1986
  • of material (15.67. 'possible', 177. 'probable' and 4.57. 'site'). Transect M itself produced unusually high quanti ti es of brick and tile, and a high proportion of its concentrations were characterized by brick and tile - some of which had Roman pottery associated. Transect R was notable
  • for its very 1 ow proportions of médiéval pottery and very high of post-medi eval . Thèse results are striking by comparison with patterns of material recovered from the four core communes. Whereas the amounts of Roman material collected from the surface are mue h the same, the amounts
  • and proportions of médiéval material are 1 ower (especially in R) - as in N - while those of post-medi eval material are considerably higher, though not as high as in N; in the core 507. of pottery collected from the surface was médiéval and 46.77. post-medi eval . The proportion
  • of concentrations characterized by médiéval pottery is much lower than in the core (where it was 54.77.), and that by post-medi eval much higher (20.47. in the core). The overall distribution of material nevertheless shares some characteristics with that in the core. Again there are 'blank
  • scatter with Roman material lies near the bourg of Comblessac and not on some distant periphery, as is more usual . In Transect M there were 'blank' areas on the banks of the River Aff and its tributaries but most notable was a very marked and very large 'blank' zone in the commune
  • of Bruc — for a distance of some 2.5km; thèse 'blank' fields begin already in the eastern part of Sixt commune though do not reach as far as the présent boundary of Pipriac on the east. Everything, including the shape of the fields, suggests that this is an area of late exploitation
RAP00568.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • some pièces were 5mm across. This layer varied in thickness -from 0.75m on the eastern, up-slope, side o-f the trench to 0.38m on the west. At the east end the top sur-face o-f 2 curved as i -f the layer had been mounded up. This layer could not be total ly excavated over the whole
  • Df the material in it, do not however suggest a midden but rather collapsed walls or some sort of bank. The absence of Roman material from the dump suggests that it was formed before the Roman period: the few Roman sherds found in the topsoil could have been derived from a very
  • the stone in the plough soil of T36 included plenty of introduced building stone, which must have been carried more than 1 km to this spot; this stone, then, may in tact dérive from the collapse of some nearby structure of médiéval date (cf. H132 below). It is just possible
  • ). There was a sub-rect anqul ar pit në;
  • . The pottery was abraded, which implies that some time and/or distance separated its use as pottery from its place of déposition in A31/79. Now, the pits were largely confined to the ridge while a séries of approx i mat el y parai lel ditches, most with the same profile, extended from
  • did not dérive from the local bedrock (Brioverian shale). A small number of squares (7) had some Roman pottery (maximum 3 sherds per square) while the post-medi eval pottery (maximum 7 sherds per square) was evenly distributed over the field, as were the small quantities (maximum
  • %). Some of the Brioverian shale was tooled; and the quartzite was di st i net i vel y like that recovered in 1986 from excavations on H80 1km away (Astill and Davies 1987, 116). In maki ng the extension a gap of about lm was left between the corner and the new wall to make a doorway
  • dug out; one hole was dug down from plough soil (15, 16). 23- T32 and T3B produced a remarkable amount o-f pottery, some 2402 sherds, weighing 16.3kg and representing a minimum o-f 126 vessels. This is a staggering amount -from such a small area. Most of this pottery
  • of the relationship between land-use and settlement during the 1 ast two thousand years, took place from 25 August - 1 October in the communes of Ruffiac, Tréal , St-Ni col as-du-Tertre and Carentoir, in the department of Morbihan in eastern Brittany. The ai m of the study is to détermine when
  • /79, H 132, 874, L26, D153) from which 'total' collection had previously been made (fig. 1). Of thèse, A92 had been started in 1986 and remained to finish. The ai rn of thèse smal 1 excavations was the investigation of surf ace/'sub-surf ace rel at i onshi ps; fields were selected
  • five-day planning trips by two in September 1987 and April 1988. The team, consisting of volunteers from a wide range of places, numbered twenty-six, including the directors, one finds assistant and three supervisors; it worked for f i ve weeks from 28 August, with four days off
  • , and only two days were lost because of rain; however , the gênerai dryness meant that the ground was hard and made for very heavy working. EBS 88 B409 (Carentoir Zft 161) B409 lies on a west-facing si ope near the settlement of Le Eiois Guillaume, documentée! from the eighteenth
  • century as a metai rie (fig. 2). The field was permanent meadow in the early nineteenth century. In 1982 it was walked at 50m intervais and was classified as a 'médiéval site'; some Roman pottery was also recovered. In 1987 the field was gridded in 5m squares and walked for 'total
  • pottery (maximum 5 sherds per square) was more evenly spread. Smal 1 quanti ti es of brick and tile (maximum 0 .5kg per square) were uhevenl y distributed, but tended to concentrate in the south of the field, away from the cl Lister i ng of pre—médiéval and médiéval pottery
  • . It was original ly hoped to eut lm—wide trenches, 30m apart, acr oss the field, but the crop of maize prevented suc h ex t en si ve sampling. The f armer, however , kindly àgjeèd to the prématuré h ar vest i ng of some of the-? maize so théi we could ex cavale a 6m square. The square (T36
  • , and the majority (577.) of the post-medi eval wares was ni neteenth-century . Smal 1 quanti ti es of brick and tile were recovered but only from the first three spits (total 23 fragments, 0. 787kg) . Context 1, however, had in addition to local quartz and quartzite large quantities (120kg
  • o-f the trench because o-f lack of space for the spoil, so the trench was reduced in size to 6 X 3m. The pottery from this layer (2), like the stone fragments, provides a complète contrast with that of the plough soil. 61 sherds were found, ail of which were Irôn Age, the most
  • . The range o-f pottery recovered -from the top two spits was very différent -from the lowest spit. In the first twenty centimètres 45 sherds were -found; médiéval pottery predominated (837.), -followed by post-medi eval (157.) and a single sherd o-f Roman pottery (27.) ; 52 -fragments o-f
  • -orange clay (24) from the surface of which came 20 sherds of Iron-Age pottery, the majority of which were of Fabrics 86 (607) and 89 (257). There was no sign of feat ures eut into this layer, which 1 ay directly on the degraded, manganèse— stai ned , quartzitic bedrock (05a) (33
  • ) . Comment The occurrence of médiéval and post-medi eval pottery in the plough soil, but not beneath , and the lack of conte;-; ts of thèse période would suggest that this matériel was not deriyed from SLib— surface features. Manuring might wel 1 account for the evenly distributed
RAP00566.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • contrast black and pink/purple roofing fragments occurred together in zones immediately north of the Ruffiac basin and west of the Trelo zone. It was also possible, in some cases, to distinguish a range of other schi stes that were imported from nearby local sources, probably as walling
  • ) to check the négative results from Ti 1 and T9. The sections of the trenches were cleaned by hand and recorded. In ail some 50 working days were spent on site? the average size of the team was seven. Trench 9 The plough soil was excavated in 10cm spits. The amount of pottery decreased
  • presurnabl y some kind of hardstanding or floor (9) « The northern extent of the standing was established by augering and was found to peter out some three mètres north of the wall. The eastern extent. of the wall was similarly established and found to end 1 » 2m from T12, with no sign
  • Its in the holloway wi 1 i provide an interesting comparison with those samples taken -from the lower plough soi 1 s in T24 and T25 , which may be expected to be colluvial in charaicter. ^1 H80 (Treal ZN4b) 1-180 is located right on the western edge of Treal commune, some 150m
  • fragments of tile (0.632kg) and 38 sherds of Iron Age pottery (0.396kg), some of which are rims (fig. 6, 1-180-3, 5 and 10). This layer also contained several large, f 1 at slabs of Cambrian si Itstone like that obtai natale from a narrow band 1.5km to the north of the field. The final
  • was then allowed to silt up , a layer of clay with some charcoal accumulated (60), followed by perhaps a more deliberate backfilling with more clay (58) and a mass of burnt stone which had been thrown in from the south (59). Thèse were nearly ail hard blocks of conglomerate (387.), quartzite
  • ) and may have been associated with the pit 19. Trench 20 Five ditches were excavated in this trench (33, 34, 35/50, 37/51, 40), and the détails are tabulated below. Ditch 40 included some blocks of hard stone similar to those from T19 (59). In two cases the ditches appear to have been
  • to the south. The stone seems to have been piled into a large irregular pit which had been cut into the natural subsoil (48). It muet represent. collapse from some structure in the vicinity, but the cadastral map shows no trace of any structure or track in the area in the early nineteenth
  • , they are of a size and shape more typical of Roman sites; this impression requires confirmation after a wider study of comparative material» While T15 and T16 have produced settlement data, it is more difficult to interpret the features in the other trenches» Some (e.g. 56, 48, 64) resuit from
  • (Ruffiac ZK67a) A92 is very close to Les Landes de la Ruée on the crest o-f a ridge some 700m from La Hattaie (fig. 5). At the time of the anei en cadastre the field was u n d e
  • of fieldwork, itself part of a larger, mul t i -di sci pl i nary study of the relationship between land-u.se and settlement during the last two thousand years, took place from 21 March - 5 April and 6 -- 27 September in the communes of Ruffiac, Treal, St~Ni col as-du-Tertre , Carentoir, La
  • involved fieldwalking over large areas at wide intervais, as in 1982 85, in the four core communes; sampling in the communes surrounding the core? and excavation of parts of a field from which 'total' collection had previously been made. Two days (21-22 March) were spent in préparation
  • for the main season by two people. The team (consisting largely of past and présent students from the Universities of London, Reading, Durham and Sheffield) numbered twenty, including the directors, and worked for twelve days, from 23 March, with one day off. A smal 1 team, of the directors
  • worked flints were also collected, three from transect E, three from B, two from B and one from D. One possible platform and thirty lynchets were noted, of which fifteen were in Transect D. As in previous years there were considérable variations in the concentration of recovered
  • s 10 (3.5) 24 (8.4) 23 (8.1) 57 (207.) 285 per transect and in tôt o. ) Of thèse concentrations, none produced predomi nantly Roman material although 17.57» produced some Roman material;; 12.37. had predomi nanti y médiéval, 22.87. predomi nant 1 y post-medi eval , and 8.8
  • and also zones that tend to produce more or less of a surface scatter» Surface material is usually markedly absent from areas near the commune boundaries and is also difficult to find in the fields to the north of Qui 1 vain and around Le? Bois Faux; si gni f i cant 1 y , the more
  • of Transect G, from Métairie au Joly to Le Nouai-)» The figures quoted above demonstrate the remarkably high proportion of fields in G with large concentrations of surface material. The présence of tile scatters, sometimes with smal 1 quanti ties of Roman material associated, were notable
  • near the northern boundary of Transect D (a Roman road) and in the nei ghbourhood of Marsac , La Ruaudaie and La Roche Pèlerin» Analysis of the spatial distribution of imported local schi stes » parti cul arl y those used for roofing material s in the area, produces some equally
  • marked patterns» Such schi stes were présent on most fields (largely as a resuit of manuring), with the exception of some areas of 1 an de in the northern part of Transect B and of some isolated, scattered fields (D6 and 7, E267) with no other surface material. However , it was again
  • possible to see zoning in the présence of thèse schi stes» hence, only black schi stes occurred throughout the ^Ruffiac basin (from Lodineu to Ville Robert and south to La Rivière) and also in a large zone in the north of Transects D and E (from Trelo to La Touche du Mur); in strong
RAP01768.pdf (le mésolithique en Bretagne. rapport de projet collectif de recherches)
RAP00565.pdf ((56). quatre communes du Morbihan : carentoir)
  • or schi ste; the imported material is notably absent from fields cleared of woodl and since the 1 ate nineteenth century. Fieldwalking in 5m squares ('Total' Coll ecti on ) In order to investigate the nature of sites identified in transect walking, as in 1983 and 1984 some fields
  • to the bedrock. Quantities of natural schi ste from this field were enormous, some squares producing 45kg; the sampling strategy proved to be of very limited value since it was impossible to gain a sensé of overall distribution and difficult to correl ate the collected squares with the cl
  • with that generated by survey undertaken around St Malo by the Centre Régional Archéologique d'Alet. Similarities in some of the médiéval fabrics were noted, and there was a striking visual similarity between fabric 10 and pottery from a kiln found at Guipel ( 1 1 1 e et Vilaine). The kiln
  • there, with some useful focussing on early modem, pre-cadastral use: the relevant problems are those of distinguishing manuring from settlement scatters and of determining the extent of scatter generated from inhabited buildings (Astill and Davies 1984c: 55-8). It is even clearer that crude
  • as significant as surface brick and tile. We have made some progress in characterising the local schi stes - which are of very mixed character and considérable local variation - by identifying small quarries within the study area and comparing samples with material from buildings and from
  • quarry samples and some further limited testing of 'total' collection sites would therefore be useful, particularly from a site with a known, though collapsed, cadastral settlement; the nature of the red/yellow schi stes unevenly distributed on A107 and the grey/green schi ste
  • introduced into the field bounded by the lynchets and eut by Trench 1, need some further investigation. The next season Next year will see two main seasons of fieldwork: fieldwalking and small excavation from 22 March - 5 April 1986 and three weeks of excavation during September
  • : transects will be taken radially from the area of intensive study, and fields within them walked at 50m intervais. Excavation of Allô will begin, in order to ascertain the relationship of this year's excavated features with the settlement and at the same time make some assessment
  • collection; phosphate analysis and soil magnetic susceptibil ity survey of the four selected areas; and excavation of part of a bank and lynchet near a field from which 'total' collection had previously been made. Three days (21-23 March) were spent in préparation by three people
  • ; the main team (consisting largely of past and présent students from the Universities of London and Reading) numbered twenty-two, including the directors; it worked for twel ve days, from 24 March, and had one day off; nine people (including one director) remained for an additional week
  • covered, encompassing 772 hectares (4.01% of the surface area of the four communes). 30.99kg of pottery and 93.92kg of man-made building material were recovered from the transects; 45% of the pottery was médiéval, 53.6% post-medieval and 1.4% Roman. No pre-Roman pottery was found
  • , but sixteen worked flints were recovered, three from transect L, three from C and ten from F, and also a stone axe, the stone of which has yet to be identified (F117). Two possible areas of ridge and furrow were noted, along with fourteen lynchets and eight (mostly substantial) old banks
  • cadastre, as usual. More than three-quarters of the concentrations (80.2%) lay more than 100m away from early nineteenth-century settlements and only 7.5% lay within 50m of them. (This is not signif icantly différent from distances from modem settlements). Surface material tends
  • in nineteenth-century meadow and/or pasture (3.8%), marginal 1 ande (unculti vated land, not fallow - a high 8.6%), woodl and (0.5%), curtilage and areas of mixed land-use; ail but the latter suggest some measurable change in land-use by indicating pre-nineteenth-century arable or settlement
  • . In some parts cadastral land-use, naming and road patterns themselves indicate former settlement sites, especially where very small fields of very mi scell aneous^ land-use are arranged in relation to tracks, like the curti 1 agesand clos that surround settlements both now
  • in the Coet Morel /Hôtel Orl and area (Carentoir). Surface material is markedly absent from fields on the northern and southern boundaries of L, on the east/west ridges (particularly on a band north west of Carentoir) and - as might be expected - on most steep slopes. There are again
  • samples for future phosphate analysis were taken from the topsoil in ail squares, at 5m intervais, and soil magnetic suscepti bi 1 i ty readings were also taken at 5m intervais, at the spot from which samples had been lifted. Fluxgate gradiometer readings were not taken since 1984
  • tests suggested that thèse were only useful if taken at much narrower intervais. Schiste was collected, totally from A107, D221 and B216, and in a limited sample from B347 (from one square in every nine). This was subsequently classified in three colour catégories (black/grey, green
  • was recorded, the field being the same size and shape as at présent but divided into bandes; an area of 1 ande lay to the north and the nearest settlement (La Boulardaie) lay 130m away. Pottery, building material and schi ste were collected from an area of 1 hectare, distributed ail over
  • and topographie position are similar to those of B319, walked in 1983 and also interpreted as a manuring scatter (Astill and Davies 1984a: 20). Six fields in the near vicinity were also walked at 50m intervais; thèse produced some material but no notable concentrations. D221 lies on the 45m
RAP03364.pdf (PLOUGASTEL-DAOULAS (29). Le Rocher de l'Impératrice. Rapport de FP 2014-2016)
  • the nature and rhythm of the techno-economic transformation marking this poorly understand transitional period between Magdalenian and Azilian. Lithic production shows high qualitative standards and exhibits some characteristic clearly inherited from the Magdalenian (production of long
  • knowledge of these groups is however unequaled: if the Late Azilian and the Pleistocene/Holocene transition communities are now well known after some recent works, this is not the case of the Magdalenian and first Azilian societies. The launching of a research program in 2013 in a small
RAP02521.pdf (MOLÈNE (29). beg ar loued : un habitat en pierres sèches campaniformes, âge du bronze ancien. rapport final de fouille programmée 2007-2009)
RAP03345.pdf (QUIBERON (56). Beg-er-Vil : Un habitat du Mésolithique sur le littoral du Morbihan. Rapport de FP)
RAP00129.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport de sondage et de prospection-inventaire.)
  • approximative du mur romain; obscured by thick vegetation=masqué par une végétation épaisse; sea= mer; road= route; path= chemin; steep slope down to sea=pente raide descendant vers la mer. Le Yaudet. Portes maritimes de l'Age du Fer et de l'époque romaine (edge of cliff=abrupt de la
  • h e Baie de l a V i e r g e , a wide e s t u a r y a t t h e mouth o f t h e r i v e r Leguer. The promontory, r o u g h l y r e c t a n g u l a r i n shape, i s separated from t h e mainland by a deep v a l l e y a l o n g which t h e minor road from Le Yaudet v i l l a g e t
  • h e headland from t h e mainland was u t i l i z e d as p a r t o f t h e d e f e n s i v e system i n t h e pre-Roman p e r i o d by t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a rampart along i t s n o r t h - w e s t e r n edge running from a prominent granite Beaumanoir, a t t h e
  • f t h e a n c i e n t v i l l a g e o f Le Yaudet and t h e r e l i c o f i t s f a r m l a n d , now abandoned. The s i t e was a c q u i r e d by t h e Departement o f Cote du Nord i n 1980, a t t h e r e q u e s t o f t h e Commune, t o p r o t e c t i t from development
  • i s c o v e r i e s made over t h e years have been c o n v e n i e n t l y summarized by L. Pape (1978, ASSASS) t o which may now be added a discussion o f C e l t i c and C a r t h a g i n i a n c o i n s from a n i n e t e e n t h c e n t u r y c o l l e c t i o n thought
  • t o have come from t h e s i t e (Sanquer 1983). Several excavations extensive nature. have taken place b u t none o f an I n 1935 a number o f s k e l e t o n s were d i s c o v e r e d c l o s e t o t h e church (parcelle 29). They were w i t h o u t d a t i n g
  • evidence b u t an e a r l y medieval date seems l i k e l y (Savidan 1935; Mazeres 1936). From 1952 u n t i l 1954 P r o f e s s o r F l e u r i o t examined t h e Roman w a l l a t t h e n o r t h - e a s t corner o f t h e s i t e b o t h west and s o u t h o f t h e Poste de Douane
  • a l (Garlan 1969). Finally, i n 1978, a s m a l l sondage was dug t o examine a c i r c l e , which appeared on an a i r photograph, i n advance o f t h e c r e a t i o n o f a car park. P o t t e r y o f Bronze Age type was r e p o r t e d . It i s c l e a r from
  • the archaeological i n v e s t i g a t i o n s and casual d i s c o v e r i e s and from t h e h i s t o r i c a l r e c o r d (De La B o r d e r i e 1853, 1896; Fleuriot considerable h i s t o r i c a l 1954b) t h a t Le Yaudet i s a site of potential: the promontory has produced
  • r o n Age t h e s i t e c o n t i n u e d t o be occupied i n t h e Roman p e r i o d and a t some s t a g e , p o s s i b l y i n t h e l a t e t h i r d o r f o u r t h c e n t u r y was in defended by a w a l l t h e m i g r a t i o n p e r i o d t h e s e t t l e m e n t
  • d e p o s i t s was l i k e l y t o be good, w h i l e Trench 2 was l o c a t e d t o examine t h e s t r a t i g r a p h y i m m e d i a t e l y behind t h e Roman d e f e n s i v e w a l l . results, as w i l l be apparent from t h e d e s c r i p t i o n The t o follow
  • granite. with and t o remove some b l o c k s o f these yellow a natural features sandy soil sand ( l a y e r 21). which was a l a y e r soil 100-120 of mm had accumulated The s o i l mottled thick above t h e l a y e r produced p i e c e s o f c h a r c o a l
  • of g r i t t y soil some f l e c k s o f c h a r c o a l and o c c a s i o n a l sherds o f Late I r o n Age p o t t e r y . Through t h i s l a y e r a s h a l l o w p i t (F25) had been c u t , i n t h e bottom o f which was a l a y e r o f i n situ burning producing
RAP02357.pdf (SAINT-MARCEL (56). "la Sente Verte". le bourg. rapport final d'opération de fouille préventive)
  • decorated in the Quoit Brooch Style from the burials at Saint-Marcel (Morbihan) (Barry AGER) 2 p. 138 p.142 p.142 p.142 p.143 p. 144 p. 146 p.147 p. 149 Rapport Final d'Opération SAINT MARCEL « LE BOURG » (56) 2008 Phase 4 : chemins et fossés parcellaires Episode 4A Episode 4B p
RAP01714.pdf (PLOUHINEC (29). "ménez-drégan I". rapport intermédiaire 2000 de fp 3 (2000-2002))
  • , particular fossilisation processes could protect DNA molecules in some fossils from microbial, oxidative and hydrolytic attack and preserve them for a much longer time. I have shown^ that this is indeed the case and that DNA can be found preserved in 465.000 years-old tbssil bones
  • (originating from a layer dated by ESR of the Lower Palaeolithic site of Menez-Dregan, Brittany, France"^). However, this DNA is present in an insoluble form associated to the mineral matrix and resists up to now standard extraction procedures and thus PCR analyses. I could demonstrate
  • that it prevents up to now conventional extraction and PCR amplification. To validate this approach, more recent, morphologically well preserved and palaeontologically determined bones from various periods (from Neolithic to modem times) are now being investigated. Current results show
  • the presence of this DNA using a molecular hybridisation technique with modern genomic DNA as probes. This technique which is insensitive to enzyme inhibitors present in all fossil extracts and less sensitive to contaminations with modem DNA allowed me to identify the taxa of the bones
  • that molecular hybridisation is still the most adequate approach to analyse DNA in fossil bones regardless of its solubility. So far, soluble DNA can be found and analysed by PCR only in the more recent bones. However, some of them also contain preserved DNA in an insoluble form
  • . In conclusion, DNA can be preserved over much longer periods of time than previously expected in a form stably associated to other fossil components. This presumably shields DNA from chemical and microbial degradation allowing this amazing preservation. However, this association presently
  • hampers sequence analysis of the genetic material as current extraction procedures, developed for present day, biological samples are inefficient. 1 Lindahl, T., and Nyberg, B. Rate of chain breakage at apurinic sites in double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid. Biochemistry 1972, 11:3618
  • the limits of this extrapolation. Indeed, particular fossilisation processes could "shield" the DNA molecules and preserve them for a much longer time. One could predict that such shielding transforms the properties of the preserved DNA and requires particular extraction procedures
  • to render it soluble. I show herein that this is indeed the case and that DNA can be found preserved m 465.000 years-old fossil bones (originating from a layer dated by ESR of the Lower Palaeolithic site of Menez-Dregan, Brittany, France). This DNA is present in an insoluble form
  • associated to the mineral matrix and resists standard extraction procedures up to now. Although PCR analyses cannot be performed on such insoluble material, I could demonstrate the presence of this DNA using a molecular hybridisation technique. This technique allowed me to identify
  • these results, more recent bones from various periods (from Neolithic to modern times) are now being investigated. Ciurent results show that molecular hybridisation is still the most adequate approach to analyse DNA in fossil bones regardless of its solubility. So far, soluble DNA can
  • be found and analysed by PCR only in the more recent bones. However, some of them also contain preserved DNA in an insoluble form. In conclusion, DNA can be preserved over much longer periods of time than previously expected. It is found closely associated to components that presumably
  • allow this amazing conservation. However, this association presently hampers analysis as current extraction procedures are inefficient. Characterisation of these compoimds, of the nature of the association and of the bone diagenesis processes that allowed this preservation should
RAP02918.pdf (HOËDIC (56). groah denn. rapport de fp 2013)
  • front de taille extraction inachevée percuteur sur galet Front de taille au pied de l'affleurement : bloc à l'extraction inachevée et galet percuté Fig. 6 : Hoedic-Groah Denn : le rocher R2, front de taille sur le bord méridional. 21 Projet archéologique Houat-Hoedic - Groah
  • Denn (Hoedic) Opération archéologique annuelle - rapport d’activité 2013 Des extractions mégalithiques avortées à chaque extrémité de la fouille Le affleurements R1 et R2 montrent tous deux des tentatives d’extraction mégalithique avortée. Sur le rocher R1, c’est l’ensemble de
RAP01557.pdf (PLOULEC'H (22). le Yaudet. rapport final de synthèse de fouille programmée 1996-1998)
RAP03817 (QUIBERON (56). Beg er Vil : un habitat de chasseurs-cueilleurs maritimes de l'Holocène. Rapport de FP 2019)
  • ..................................................................................... 129 4 Etudes post-fouille - 2019 7.2. Archéographie de l’habitat littoral de Beg-er-Vil à Quiberon .............................132 7.3. Extraction des différentes temporalités ..................................................................133 7.4. Temps court, temps long